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Full text of "Boone County Recorder"

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THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDEF 




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ESTABLISHED 1875 



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VOLUME 68 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January 6, 1944 



. 



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NUMBER 29 



FOUR-DAY SALE 
WEEK IS VOTED 



FOR BURLEY MARKETS IN 
STATE— NEW SCHEDULE DE- 

- CIDED BY WFA THURSDAY AT 
LEXINGTON MEETING. 



Tobacco markets throughout the 
burley belt will operate on a four- 
day schedule beginning this week, 
according to reports. It was agreed 
that Fridays sale will be discon- 
tinued, at least temporarily. 

The new schedule was decided 
upon Thursday at a meeting in 
Lexington of the War Food Ad- 
ministration's Industry Advisory 
Committee on Burley Tobacco. 

The shorter week was made 
necessary by the difficulty which 
is being experienced at redrying 
plants in keeping up with deliv- 
eries, according to Hugh W. Taylor, 
in charge of the WFA's Admin- 
tration and Training Division. 
Many plants which ordinarily op- 
erate on a 24-hour basis have been 
operating on a basis of 10 to 14 a 
day. 

The agreement on the four-day 
schedule includes Kentucky, Ten- 
nessee, Virginia, North Carolina, 
Missouri, Indiana, Ohio and West 
Virginia. '-> 

The committee, which authoriz- 
ed WFA officials to restore the 
five-day week later in the season 
if conditions permit, also decided 
that no sales should start before 
9:30 a. m. to afford inspectors 
more time for their work, and that 
sales would be limited to five 
hours a day from Monday through 
Thursday 

The size of baskets also was re- 
stricted to 700 pounds, under a res- 
olution adopted at the meeting. 



Watch Service Held 
At Florence Baptist 
Church December 31 



MEMBERS OF BOONE COUNTY SOIL CONSERVATION DISTRICT 



The people of the Florence Bap- 
tist Church held their annual 
Watch Night Service at the church 
the night of December 31. The 
service began at 9 o'clock with a 
patriotic service of one hour. Re- 
freshments and a fellowship hour 
was held in the basement of the 
church. The final period was one 
of prayer and devotion with speci- 
al emphasis on prayer for our na- 
tion and its leaders, the oppressed 
nations of the earth, our enemies 
in the present conflict and the 
boys in service and the general 
progress of the war in the coming 
year. 



LLOYD MEMORIAL 

SOCIETY TO MEET 



The Lloyd Memorial Society will 
hold its regular monthly meeting 
at the home of Mrs. Mary Fulton, 
Florence, on Saturday, January 8. 
All members are requested to be 
present. 




FINANCE OF FIRE 
DEPT. IS SOLVED 






Producers Must File 
Dairy Feed Subsidy 
Payments, Is Word 






ANONYMOUS C O N T R I B UTOR 
WILL MATCH NEW SUBSCRIP- 
TIONS UP TO $500— BUILDING 
FOR FIRE HOUSE OBTAINED. 



Pictured above are C. L. Hempfling, chairman; O. C. Ransom, secretary; 
H. E. White, equipment supervisor; J. C. Beddinger and W. H. Presser, 
supervisors 



Entertain On 54th 

Wedding Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sehree en- 
tertained with a" turkey dinner at 
their lovely country home on 
Christmas Day. That day was also 
Mr. and Mrs. Sebree's 54th wed- 
ding anniversary. 

Those present to celebrate this 
occasion with them were their 
children and grandchidlren, Mr. 
and Mrs. Leland Snyder, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edgar Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dolpha Sebree and Frances, Kath- 
ryn, Bernice, Bud and Ronald Se 
bree. \ 



• 



FARM AND HOME 
WEEK JAN. 25-28 



1' 



NUMBER OF FARM LEADERS EX- 
PECTED TO ATTEND FROM 
THIS COUNTY— INTERESTING 
PROGRAM WILL BE HEARD. 

. ; ~* 
• • y 
The annual Farm and Home 

Convention will be held at the Ex- 
periment Station, Lexington on 
January 25, 26, 27, and 28th', ac- 
cording to H. R. Forkner, Cdunty 
Agent. The convention annually 
attracts a number of leading farm- 
ers and farm women from;, the 
county. 

Speakers on the convention pro- 
gram include: Roy Hendrickson, 
director of food distribution, on 
"Food as a Weapon"; Miss Florence 
Hall, o f Washington "Women's 
Part in Food Production" ; Marvin 
Briggs, of Indiana, "Farm Cooper- 
atives"; Dr. W. Faith Williams, U. 
S. Dept. of Labor, '.When the Na- 
tions Get Together"; I. Forest 
Huddleston, Michigan State Col- 
lege, "Keeping Farm Animals 
Healthy"; Miss Elsie Margarete 
Roed, Norway, "Life Under Germ- 
an Occupation"; A. H. Tandy, 
British Consul, "Food and Farming 
in Britain Today"; Mrs. Chu Shih- 
Ming, "China's Part in the War"; 
Miss Flora Dodson, returned mis- 
sionary, "Life in a Japanese Prison 
Camp"; Miss Gertrude Dieken, 
Wilmington, .Del., "Postwar Pros- 
pects for Homemakers"; J. B. Hut- 
son, of Washington, "The Farmers' 
Part in the War in 1944." 

The County Agents' or Home 
Demonstration Agents' office will 
have a limited number of the 
meeting programs. The conven- 
tion has for its purpose the bring- 
ing together of outstanding farm 
and home authorities to discuss 
with farm people timely and im- 
portant problems. 



FOflD PRODUCTION 
IMPORTANT IN 1944 



EXTENSION ASSOCIATION TO 
HOLD SERIES OF MEETINGS IN 
NEAR FUTURE TO PLAN FOR 
COMING YEAR. 



Home food production will play 
a more important part with farm 
people in 1944, according to H. R. 
Forkner, Countju Agent and Mary 
Hood Gillaspie, Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent. Boone County Exten- 
sion Association and Homemakers' 
Club leaders will hold a series of 
meetings in the near future to plan 
ways and means of meeting both 
the economic and wartime needs 
for increased home food produc- 
tion and more efficient uses of 
home produced fqpds: 

The 1944 educational program 
will include not only quantity pro- 
duction but greater- varieties over 
longer periods of time, the more 
efficient canning, storing and pre- 
serving of these products and the 
more efficient and palatable uses 
of these products in the family 
diet. 

; Farm families have made re- 
markable progress in home food in 
recent years. Last year was a rec- 
ord home food production year. 
Higher quality foods were preserv- 
ed for winter uses the past fall 
than ever before, according to the 
homemakers' club reports, i 

Christmas Seal Quota 

Falls Short Of Goal 

' 

According to a report just re- 
leased by R. V. Lents, executive 
secretary of the Boone County 
Tuberculosis Association, the Tub- 
erculosis Christmas Seal sale is 36 
percent short of the county quota 
of $725. Mr. Lents stated that the 
quota could be reached by send- 
ing him your dollar now for the 
seals x. .ailed. 

All schools are requested to make 
reports immediately to Mr. Lents. 
Don't forget that it is not too late 
to send in your dollar for Christ- 
mas seals. Put the county over 
the top. 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ryle, of 
Louisville and Rev. Elmore Ryle, of 
Richmond, spent several days dur- 
ing the holidays with their par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Manley Ryle. 



Regular Meeting Date 
Announced For 0PA 
Price Panel Workers 



The War Price and Rationing 
Board Of Boone County has an- 
nounced that the Price Panel 
Board will meet regularly at the 
main office, Walton, Ky., on the 
second Thursday of each month 
for the purpose of correcting and 
adjusting retail ceiling prices thru- 
out Boone County, as well as to 
hear any complaints Hhat may 
come before the board. 

The public is invited to consult 
with this board from 2:00 to 4:00 
p. m. op its regular meeting day. 

Mrs. Allen Gaines, of Walton, has 
recently been appointed Price 
Panel Assistant to aid in checking 
prices in the Walton vicinity "and 
others are expected to be added in 
other parts of the county in the 
near future. \ 



Vincent Named 

President Of 

Organization 



Henry Ellis Burden 

Henry Ellis Burden, Walton busi- 
ness man and farmer, passed 
away Tuesday , : De cember 28, fol- 
lowing alisarf^JRaci:. Mr.* Burden 
was a former resident of Nicholas 
County, having moved • here 10 
years ago. 

He is survived by his foster 
daughter, Miss Daisy Hill, of Wal- 
ton; one brother and sister, both 
of Cincinnati, O. 

Funeral services were conducted* 
from Chambers & Grubbs funeral 
home Friday, December 31st at 11 
a. m., with burial in Cynthiana. 



James W. Gaines 



James W. Gaines, son of the 
late John W. Gaines and Mary 
Rogers Gaines, died December 17, 
1943 at the age of 73 years. 

Mr. Gaines was born and reared 
in this community, but during the 
past thirty-six years had made his 
home in Houlton, Oregon. » 

He is survived by two sisters, 
Mrs. Joe Kinkead of Los Angeles 
Calif., and Miss Anna Gaines, of 
Cincinnati; a brother Vess Gaines, 
of Burlington and a half brother 
Ab Gaines, of Erlanger and a 
host of other relatives. 



. 



: 

John L. Jones 



BURLINGTON P-T. A. TO MEET 



The regular monthly meeting of 
the Burlington P.-T. A. will be 
held at the school house Monday 
evening, January 10, at 7:30 p. m. 
All members are urged to attend. 




Good Hens Pay Best 

Good hens pay nest, according to 
O. D. Perkinson, Assistant County 
Agent. High production per bird is 
a wartime must. 

. Every poultryman during Decem- 
ber should carefully carry out the 
•following practices: 
^1. Rigid culling of. non-layers and 
poor producers. Feed is too high to 
feed poor producers. 

2. Provide adequate housing with 
from 314 to 4 squajefeet per bird 
free from drafts or dampness. 

3. Full feed good laying mash and 
grain. 

4. Provide a "noon lunch" in the 
form of a wet mash. Use skim milk 
if available. 

5. Provide plenty of fresh water — 
prevent freezing of water. '■ 

6. Confine birds close to plenty of 
feed and water until noon. 

7. Feed; legume hay A by klve good 
rang?, 

8. Use a deep litter on floor. 

9. Examine birds regularly for 
lice and the house for mites. 

Laying birds should pay a profit 
now. Cull birds are wasting valu- 
able feed. 



John L. Jones, Bullittsville, pass- 
ed away in his home, Saturday, 
December 25th from an attack of 
influenza. 

He is survived hy -his widow, Mrs. 
Izora Jones^ one son Bert Jones, 
and one granddaughter. 

Funeral services were conducted 
from the home Tuesday at 2 p. m. 
with Ref. J. W. Campbell, offici- 
ating. Burial was in Petersburg 
Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of funeral arrangements. 



Mrs. 



Laura Piner 



Raymond L. Vincent, of Wil- 
liamstown was named president 'of 
the Kentucky Association of Com- 
monwealth Attorneys during the 
final session Thursday of & two- 
day combined meeting in Louis- 
ville of the organization with 
members of the State County At- 
torneys' and County Judges' Asso- 
ciation. * 

Mr. Vincent- was elevated to the 
office of president after having 
served as vice president during 
the past year. He has been a 
member of the organization four 
years, and previously was active in 
the county attorneys' association 
during the eight years he 'served as 
County Attorney of Grant County. 

Mr. Vincent's judicial district in- 
cludes Boone, Grant, Gallatin, 
Carroll and Owen Counties. 



George White 






Requiem High Mass was sung at 
9 a. m. Thursday-* at St* Mary 
Charon, loiTowing prayers 'at thr 
home of a sister at 8:39 a. m., for 
George White, a resident of Ken- 
ton county for many years, who 
died Monday at the home of his 
sister, Mrs. George C. Shays, 3544 
Mooney Ave., Cincinnati, after a 
short illness. Burial was in Cal- 
vary Cemetery, Cincinnati. 

Mr. White, whose grandparents 
were pioneer residents of Boone 
County, formerly worked a farm 
in this county. 

His only survivor is his sister, 
with whom he lived. 



Florence Man Loses 

Arm In Accident 



' Leroy Court, 27, of Florence, is 
reported to be improving nicely 
following the amputation of his 
left arm near the elbow, after it 
had been crushed late Monday of 
last week in an accident at Stew- 
art Iron Works Co., 17th Street 
and Madison Avenue, Covington. 



SUPERVISORS HOLD 

FINAL MEETING 



OF YEAR AT COUNTY SOIL CON- 
SERVATION OFFICE THURS- 
DAY—WORK REPORTS AND 
1944 PLANS OUTLINED. 

:' 

The last supervisors meeting for 
1943 of the Boone County Soil 
Conservation District was held 
Thursday, December 23 at the 
County office. Those present were 
W. H. Presser, H. E. White, G. C. 
Ransom, supervisors; D. W. Orcutt 
district conservationist, and John 
C. Acree, work unit leader. 

Reports were given in regard to 
the work accomplished in the dis- 
trict and the plans of work for 
1 1944. D; W. Orcutt brought before 



The Burlington Volunteer Fire 
Department has. been presented 
with a happy solution of its fin- 
ances for equipment and housing 
same, if the people of this commu- 
nity will do their part. 

Someone unknown to the depart- 
ment has offered to give $500.00 to 
help finance the Burlington ,fire 
organization provided $500.00 will 
be raised in addition to what has 
already been raised and pledged. 
For every dollar of new subscrip- 
tions to the fund from now on will 
be matched with an equal amount 
by this anonymous subscriber ly to 
$500.00. In this way we will have 
$1000.00 in new subscriptions, in 
addition to the amounts already 
subscribed. - 4 

Make your donations to C. D. 
Benson, treasurer, as soon as pos- 
sible and help this worthy cause. 
Remember when we raise $50k1.OO 
now it amounts to $l,000.00^tb the 
fire company. 

Arrangements have been made 
to house the fire truck and I equip- 
ment in the brick building known 
as Library Hall adjoining Luther 
Smith's Grocery. This building will 
be remodeled to suit the require- 
ments of the fire department, by 
removing a portion of the floor and 
arranging an opening in the front 
wall to permit entrance of the fire 
truck. . 

The department is in n^ed of 
funds to finish paying for equip- 
ment and remodeling the bu ld- 
ing. Help to get-this $500.00 &ri- 
onymous contribution at once. 






School Band Plays 

Christmas Carols 

————'■ •'•''■'. 

Christmas- carols played by the 
Boone County School Hand, under 
the direction of Dean Bloss \ ere 
highly enjoyed by residents* of 
Burlington and -persons attending 
the Kiger trial, Tuesday night, 
December 21st. 

The band assembled at the court 
house at *7:30 and played sever- 
al selections. ' Persons from v all 
sections of the county who heard 
the program were loud in their 
praise of the band. 

• IT r" 

: — 

Farm Management 

Meeting Scheduled 



•J 



Mrs. Laura Piner, 74, Crittenden, 
Ky., passed away at St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Friday, December 24, fol- 
lowing a brief illness. 

She is survived by one son, 01an'* he supervisors that payments will 
Piner of Crittenden and three be made on conservation practices 



grandchildren. 

Funeral services were conduct- 
ed from Chambers & Grubbs fu- 
neral home, Walton with ftie Rev. 
Lloyd Robinson, of Erlanger, in 
charge. Burial was in Independ- 
ence Cemetery. 



Week Of Prayer 

To Be Observed 



January 3 to January 9 has been 
designated as a Week of Prayer 
by President Franklin D. Roose- 
velt. Pastors of the various Boone 
County churches urge members to 
join in this observance. 



through the AAA program. These 
practices are contour cultivation, 
harvesting of vetch and rye seed, 
construction of terraces, diversion 
ditches and farm reservoirs. 

It was agreed that quarterly 
meetings of the supervisors would 
be held in view of the gasoline and 
tire shortage. - 

Boone County was the 18th Soil 
Conservation District established 
in Kentucky. Now there are 39 dis- 
tricts with several more in the 
making. Slowly but surely Ken- 
tucky is becoming conservation 
conscious as well as the rest of the 
United States. We are thinking 
more about building and saving 
the soil rather than mining it. 



A farm management and farm 
record keeping meeting will be 
held at Burlington, Tuesday, Jan- 
uary llth, according to H. R. Fr rk- 
ner County Agent. Roy E. Pro«or, 
field agent in farm management 
from the College of Agriculture 
will lead the discussions at the 
meeting. 

The keeping of complete farm 
accounts, records and a farm or- 
ganization to meet most efficient 
farm production problems are of 
most importance this year. 

The meeting will be divided into 
two parts. The morning prog -am 
will be devoted to farm reeord 
keeping and analyzing the farm 
business operations. The after- 
noon program • will be devoted to 
adjustment of farm operation^ in 
relation to the 1944 agricultural 
outlook. All farmers are invited 
to attend the meeting. rf 



Applications for the Dairy Feed" 
Subsidy payment for November 
and December, 1943 should be made 
when all weight receipts for milk^ 
butterf at, cream and butter are 
received. The payment will be at 
the same rate as that paid for 
October. 

Some producers have not ye1> 
filed for their October payment. It 
is permissible to include the Oct-> 
ober weights along with November 
and December, and receive a com-f 
bined pay .for the three months, 
according to John E. Crigler, Sec- 
retary of the Boone County A. C. 
Association. 

All producers are urged to sub- 
mit their weight receipts as soon 
as possible, as it is doubtful if any 
weights will be received by the 
office from the dairy companies. 



Mrs. Lizzie Duncan 
week with flu. 



was ill last 



AIRPORT ROAD 
IS DEDICATED 



THURSDAY— PROGRAM SPON- 
SORED BY NORTHERN KEN- 
TUCKY MOTOR CLUB— ALBEN 
W. BARKLEY HONOR GUEST. 



- 



Formal dedication of the Don- 
aldson Highway from Erlanger to 
the new airport located near Heb- 
ron was observed Thursday. The 
program was sponsored by the 
Northern Kentucky Motor Club. 
Senate Majority Leader, Alben 
W. Barkley and former State High- 
way Commissioner J. Lyter Donald- 
son, for whom the new road was 
named were guests of honor for 
the day. 

A blanket of snow and near-zero 
temperature failed to daunt 400 
business men and officials of 
Northern Kentucky and Cincin- 
nati in their inspection of the new 
airport and dedication services for 
the new highway. 
i Senator Barkley, speaking at a 
J dinner at the Lookout House, after 
the inspection, said a greater com-' 



STANFORD HEARD 

JIT CADM MCCTIIIP! munity spirit would come from ef 
HI Tnlim ILL 1 1 II U forts to make the new airport a 

Greater Cincinnati project. He said 

the state barrier, whether natural! 



HELD IN BURLINGTON MONDAY* or artificial, meant lit&e when 
—OUTLINES IMPORTANT PRO- community interest was consider- 
GRAM — QUARTERLY MEET- ,ed - 

INGS WILL BE HELD. - \ Judge John B. Read and Judge 

IC. L. Cropper spoke on behalf of 
Ij- Kenton and Campbell counties. 

J. E. Stanford, Executive Secre- P ls Sl ^^J 5 "^ " ^S 
tar, 0. the Kentucky Farm Bureau 'g^ ££»«£ gjjW 
Federation addressed members off^^^.^ 
the Boone County organization at 
Burlington, on Monday afternoon 
of this week. He outlined the im- 
portant farm program being spon- 
sored by the State and American' 
Farm Bureau Federations and 
stressed the importance of the 
county meeting its goal of 100 
members in 1944. 

Lloyd Siekman and C. Lisbon 
Hempfling were elected Comvy 
delegates to the State Farm Bu- 
reau convention to be held at Lou 



state. 



the 



Building And Lo 
Association 

Officers For Year 




Monday night, January 3, the 
following officers were elected by 
the Hebron Perpetual Building & 
Loan Association:. _*t«B 
W. Goodridge; vice president, 



isvflle, January 12-14. Harold Crig-' Walter Garnett; secretary and 



ler and J. C. Acree were elected 
alternate delegates. 

Constitution and By-Laws of the 
County organization calls for 
quarterly meetings to be held at 

Burlington on the first Monday of Goodridge, Hubert Conner, 1 
January, April, July and October. 

The secretary reported that 
Boone County had 58 paid mem- 
berships in 1943. All membersJ j er gens 
that Boone County 



treasurer, Hubert Conner; assist- 
j ant secretary, B. F. Hossman. 

Directors named at the meeting 
were, Emmett Kilgour, John Con- 
ner, Wilton Stephens, Chester 

F. 
Hossman, Walter Gamett, W. W. 
Goodridge, Charles Riley, S. M. 
Graves, John Crigler and Elmo 



present felt 
should exceed the goal of 100 mem- 
bers in 1944. All farmers interest-^ 
ed in a strong county Farm Bu- 
reau in 1944 are urged to send 
their $5.00 membership to John E. 
Crigler, Burlington, secretary ■« 
treasurer, or to contact one of the 
officers, directors or members. 

Lloyd Siekman of Petersburg was 
re-elected president; Stanleys. S. 
Ransom, of Walton* vice president; 
and John E. Crigler, secretary-^, 
treasurer. Directors elected for 
two years, 1944 and 1945 are Geo. 
Hei|, Florence; Joseph A. Huey, 
Union; Walter W. King, Veronal 
Hubert E. White, Burlington and S. 
D. S. Ransam, Walton. Directors 
elected for one year, or 1944, are 
J. C. Acree, Hamilton; C. L. Hemp- 
fling, Constance; John J. Klopp, 
Petersburg; Chas. B. Beall, Heb- 
ron; and W. H. Presser, Grant. 



Mrs. Emma Menefee 



Mrs. Emma Menefee, 75, widow 
of the late Dr. B. K. Menefee, of 
Covington, died Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 21 at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. John Allison Gardner, of 
Illinois. 4 

Mrs. Menefee was an active 
member of Madison Avenue Chris- 
tian Church, Covington. She ^ras 
a past grand matron, Order of 
Eastern Star, and past president of 
the Covington Womans' Club and 
Medical Auxilliary of the Southern 
Medical Association. 

Besides Mrs. Allison she is Sur- 
vived by another daughter, Mrs. 
Rod P. Hughes, Crittenden, Xy., 
and three grandchildren, i * 

Funeral services were conduct- 
ed from Walton Christian Church 
Friday with Rev. Kenneth Bowen 
officiating. Burial was in Gard- 
nersville Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs, Wstoton 
funeral home had charge of ar- 
rangements. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. L. McBee and 
son and Miss Lucile Cotton a ent 
Christmas Day with Mr. and Irs. 
W. B. Cotton and daughter, of ua- 
tonia. 



— 4- 



■*« 



FBI ANNOUNCE 
CONFERENCE 



ARRANGEMENTS MADE FOR 
JANUARY 11 FROM 1:30 P. M. 
TO 4:30 P. M. (CWT).IN COV- 
INGTON. 



Truck Owners Must 
Apply In Person For 
Gasoline Ration Book 

All truck owners who hold War 
Necessity certificates must appl^ 
in person for their gasoline for 
this quarter on or before January 
15, 1944, according to War Price 
<& Rationing Board, of Walton. 

If you fail to apply by the above 7 
date you will have to be referred 
to the Office of Defense Transport- 
ation before you can secure ans 
more gasoline for your trucks. 



Mrs. Dora M. Kindred 

Funeral services for Mrs. Dora 
Mitchell Kindred, who died Mon- 
day of last week at her home in 
Florence, were held at 2 p. m. last 
Thursday at the Tharp & Stith 
funeral home, Florence. Burial wa^j 
in Hopeful Cemetery. She was 75. 

Mrs. Kindred had been a resi- 
dent of Florence for several years, 
having moved there from Erlang- 
er. She was a member of the First 
Baptist Church, Florence. 

She is survived by her husband, 
G. Kindred; two sons, Rev. W. F. 
Mitchell, Alexandria; Russell Mit- 
chell, Florence; tour brothers, M< 
M. Lucas, Buliiftsvilfer 'Oeorgf 
Lucas, Verona; James Lucas, Gov* 
ington; John Lucas, Cincinnati; 
three sisters, Mrs. Fannie Glacken, 
Lexington; Grace Points, Cincin- 
nati; Sallie Underbill, Erlanger, 
and five grandchildren. 



H. K. Mpss, special agent in 
charge, Louisville Field Division. 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
today stated that arrangements 
have been made to hold the usual 
FBI Law Enforcement Conference 
at Covington, Ky., oh January 11, 
1944, between the hours of 1:30 
p. m. and 4:30 p. m. Central War 
Time, in the Judge Goodenough 
Court Room, County Court House. 

Law enforcement officers from 
the following counties are being 
invited to this conference: Boone, 
Kenton, Campbell; Gallatin, Grant, 
Pendleton and Owen. 

Mayor elect Thomas Fitzpatrick, 
Covington, will speak on. the sub- 
ject of "The Home Front." Police 
Court Judge] Eugene C. Benzinger, 
Covington, Ky., will also address 
the officers. , A War Department 
film, "The Battle of Britain," will 
be shawm - j FBI representatives 
will discuss national defense in- 
vestigations, and an FBI firearms 
expert will demonstrate the proper 
methods of arresting and disarm- 
ing. 

Law enforcement officers in the 
state of Kentucky have worked 
closely with the FBI since the 
summer of 1940 when conferences 
throughout the entire United 
States were held by the FBI with 
law enforcement agencies to place 
into effect a Presidential Direc- 
tive placing responsibility of con- 
ducting espionage, sabotage, and 
related national defense investiga- 
tions upon the shoulders of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation as 
well as calling upon all law en- 
forcement agencies to aid and co- 
operate with the FBI in this pro- 
gram. 

Only law enforcement officers 
will be permitted to attend the 
lecture and demonstration of the 
FBI, the address of Police Judge 
Benzinger, and the showing of 
the War Department film. 



/ 



± 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



BnflHE E1IIINTY REEflRIlEK 

A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 

RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 

Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY 



BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 
ADVERTISING INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per column inch. ' 

NOTICES AND CARDS or THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. 

CLASSIFIED ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
word one cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
ems; column depth, 21 inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate $150 Per Year 



MEMBER 



AMERICAN PRESS 



For Over Fifty Years 



. 



MEMBER 

KEKTOCKY PRESJ 
'AS SOCIATION 






IN MEMORY OF MY MOTHER 

I have lost a friend, a friend in- 
deed , 

But I'll go to God for the comfort 
I need; 

How much 111 miss your loving 
care, 

You were always ready my bur- 
dens to share. 

You were never too tired to kiss 
my tearsV>way, 

Always cheer} fl as a sunny day; 

You taught 1 >e many lessons I'll 
never forget, 

To always ber honest and I would 
have noting to regret. 

I have lost a. friend so kind and 
true, 

Always making a cloudy sky blue; 



It is always so hard to say goodbye 
But 111 meet you in heaven on 

high. 
I know you are happy in heaven 

today, 
But it was God's will or you would 

not have gone away; 
I thank God for sparing you to 

me so many years, 
But the thought of separation 

brings many tears. 
I'll think of you constantly and 

go often to your grave, 
Dad is so lonely, but tries to be 

so brave; 
I know it is only a short time until 

we will meet again. 
We knew we had to part sometime 

but we are never ready for the 

end. -c 

So now we will take our sorrows 

to one who loves us best, 
Then when our work on earth is 

ended, we can in heaven rest; 
As we look across the western sky 

at the setting of the sun, 
May we remember, life for us has 

just begun. 
You have kept your faith in God 

for so many years 
You have faced many sorrows and 

shed many tears; 
Now as we go down the valley one 

by one, 
May it be a constant reminder 

that our final race is won. 



Mother it is not because I am self- 
ish, although 

I would like to have kept you until 
Dad was called to go; 

I know it will not be long, and how 
happy you will be, 

When you and Dad are reunited, 
will be a pleasant thing to see. 
— Written by a devoted son, 



IP 



JERNARD McNEELY. 

I : 



A LETTER 






"Boone Co. Recorder ■ 
"Mr. Editor: 

"I am wondering as to whether 
or not it would be. a good idea for 
the people of Boone Co. to in- 
struct their Circuit Judge Ward 
Yager for him to instruct future 
grand juries to render no more in- 
dictments in Boone Co. for murd- 
er as Boone Co. juries will not 
convict however cold blooded the 
act may be and save the taxpayers 
the expense, 

A. ROGERS." 



Go To Church 



BELLEYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. n. Goth, Pastor . 

Sundar School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. Logers, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone is cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



BURLINGTON R. 2 



Mrs. Percy Ryle returned from 
Gulfport, Miss.; where she .spent 
the holidays with her husband. 

Mrs. Jake CoOk is ill with flu. 

Mrs. J. Cam White spent the 
week-end with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jake Cook. 

Miss Bettie Dean Ryle and Miss 
Mary Lou Williamson attended the 
party at Miss Carolyn Cropper's 
Thursday night. 

The Kermit Mallicoat family is 
suffering with flu. 

Georgee Cook spent a few days 
with home folks. 

We *are sorry to hear that Bro. 
Sam Hamilton and family have the 

flu and were unable to be at 
church Sunday. , 



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LOCKLAND, -:- OHIO 



EAST BEND METHODIST 

CHUDCH 

Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and third 

Sunday evening at 7 p. m.; also 

every fifth Sunday morning and 

evening. . 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Robt. Carter, Pastor • 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 

Sunday School 11 a. m, E. W. T. 

Church 12:01 E Jtf. T. 

Evening services 8 p. m. E. W. T„ 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. "m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8 p.m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even 
ing 8 p. m. 

You are invited to^ come— wor- 
ship an ■ work with us*. 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLD L. UJNDQUIST. D. D. 

Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

Lesson for January 9 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. ' 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 



c 



w 666 



RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School, B 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 






PETERSB URG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. 
Jarbo, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



Harry 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Sam Branham, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 
I Rouse, .Supt. i 

| MornW WotjfflilP u g, m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:0tt p. m. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.) 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



USE 
064 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




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St7 W«ST rOPBTH BTBmfr . LEipiQTON. KJMTPCKY 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



= LUDLO 




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Phone COlonial 2580 



KENTUCKY 



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PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



Sunday School) at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship, at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U. 8:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:0 0a. m. ( CWT ) 
Morning-Servicles 11 a. m. (CWT) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 



BURLING TON METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT . 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer service each Thursday at 
7:30 p. m. at the church. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kid well. Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Ah*ord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. t 
Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. ^ 
B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. *JP 

Evening Worship 8:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 




S THE T\ ST OF TIME . . . 



==? After mo, I than 37 years of successful operation we believe 
we can siJely say that our organization has stood this stern-: 
== est and nj&st exacting. of all trials. 



Chambers & Grubbs 



BULLT TTSBU RG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 
Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 

G. B. Yates, Supt. 
Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 

First and Third Sundays. 
Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:15 p. m. for Juniors. 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship at 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. nu.EWT. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



BULLTTT SBUR G BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. * 

Preaching first and third Sun. 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend these services. 



= FUNERAI DIRECTORS 



f.illlPIIIIIII 



WALTON 352 

llllllllllllllllllll 



e 



i i 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 
Orion Erbangh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:30. 
You need your church. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 
Sunday School each Sunday at 

10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed SMntJe, Supt 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 

a. m. 
Evening Service at 7:»v. (C.'V.T.) 
Praver meeting each Wednesday 

at 8:00 p. m. 



JESUS BUSY WITH HIS MINISTRY 
OF LOVE 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 1:32-45. 

GOLDEN TEXT— I must work the works 
of him that sent me. while it is day: the 
night cometh, when no man can work. — 
John 9:4. 

Jesus said that He "must work 
the works of him that sent him" 
(John 9:4). And so we find Him go- 
ing straightway about His Father's 
business. It is a good example He 
has set for us. 

What He did and how He did it 
will give us many lessons which we 
may apply to our service. We can- 
not do exactly what He did, but in 
His power we may do mighty works. 

We find our Lord doing four im- 
portant things — 

I. Healing (w. 32-34). 

We will do well to include verses 
29-31 in our thinking, for there we 
find our Lord tenderly sharing the 
sorrow of the home of a friend. One 
can picture the anxious hush that 
hovered over the home as distressed 
relatives and friends sought to al- 
leviate the suffering of the one with 
a fever. They knew the possibility 
of a; serious outcome of the illness. 
Many of us have gone through that 
dark valley. All at once there was 
new hope, and soon there was joy. 
Jesus had come and had brought 
healing. Many of us have also 
had that blessed experience. 

Christianity is not a selfish faith, 
if it follows its Lord. We see in 
verses 32 to 34 that all the city 
came to His door with the diseased 
and demon-pOssessed, and He healed 
them all. 

The account of the kindly and in- 
telligent care of the sick is written 
large on the pages of the history of 
the Christian church. We do not 
have His divine touch of immediate 
healing, but we may have His com- 
passion which served the multitude 
with tenderness and kindness. 

H. Praying (w. 35-37). 

The Son of God sought out a place 
and a time for prayer communion 
with His Father. How often we who 
profess to follow Him fail to pray 
at all. Certainly we need the grace 
and power that prayer can bring far 
more than Jesus did. But, we say, 
we are so busy. So was He. We 
are tired. So was He. People will 
not let us alone. They also fol- 
lowed Him. We make excuses, but 
we have no real r easo ns for our un- 
fortunate delinques^^ 

All men were seeking Him (v. 
37), but still He took the needed 
time to pray. It has been said that 
"if you are too busy to pray, you 
are busier than God ever intended 
you to be." 

When His disciples wanted Him, 
thajL had to look for Him in the 
place of prayer. Christian workers 
and pastors, do people find us there? 

HI. Preaching (w. 38, 39). 

Jesus said, "Let us go . . .'that I 
may preach ... for therefore came 
I forth " It bears repetition that 
while Jesus did many miracles (and 
not for a moment would we detract 
from their worth and glory), yet He 
repeatedly, by word and act, empha- 
sized the importance of preaching. 

Foolish though it may seem to the 
natural man (I Cor. 1 : 18-25) , preach- 
ing the gospel in the power of the 
Holy Spirit is now, as it has been 
through the centuries, God's chosen 
means of accomplishing His pur- 
pose. What a pity "that churches 
and pastors are forsaking it for 
book reviews, dramas, social hours, 
forums, and what not! 

God give us a revival of great, 
humble, and fearless preaching of 
the IBrd! 

IV. Cleansing (w. 40-45).. 

There is a sense in which the 
cleansing of the leper was another 
act of healing, but leprosy is such 
a striking type of sin that the inci- 
dent calls for special consideration. 

Leprosy is like sin in that it is a 
destructive malady that pursues its 
insidious way without . revealing its 
true nature until it is far advanced. 
It renders a man unclean, loath- 
some to himself and dangerous to 
others. At least such it was in the 
days of our Lord. 

Was there then no hope for the 
leper?. Yes; Jesus had come. The 
smitten man cried out, "If thou 
wilt, thou canst make me clean." 
And Jesus said, "I will . . . and 
he was cleansed." 

So may the sinner be cleansed, 
for "whosoever shall call upon the 
name of the Lord shall be saved" 
(Rom. 10:13). He will not turn the 
vilest of men away, for He came 
"to seek and to save that which 
was lost" (Luke 19:10). 

There is another important lesson 
here. The man who was cleansed 
disobeyed the instructions of Jesus 
(v. 44), with the result that the 
Lord's ministry in that place was 
greatly limited. 

We should obey the commands of 
God without question, and without 
any deviation from them. Disobedi- 
ence, even though it be by reason 
of great joy and enthusiasm, results 
in confusion. Our Lord knows ex- 
actly what should be done in a par- 
ticular place at a certain time. When 
He guides, we should conform — for 
our own good and His- glory. 



BL LLITTSVRXE CHRISTIAN 
CHURPE 

Noble Lucas, Minister 
Breaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 

at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 
Church School every Sunday at 

10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 



r 
t 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF JANUARY 6, 1904 

i 



Buffalo 

©Mrs. S. H. Marshall had a fam- 
ily reunion last Sunday. It was 
el joyed by all present. 
»Mrs. Wm. Shinkle and Miss Mary 
Reed spent the day with Mrs J. K. 
Jlstun, last Sunday. 

• Commissary 

Elbert Kelly and wife and Miss 
I ou Louden were guests of Ben- 
jamin Kelly and wife, last Sunday. 

Messrs. Lawrence Phipps and 
f arl Cason and their best girls 
were guests of Miss Julia Smith 
last Wednesday and Thursday. 

Crescent 
v Will Norman and Garnett Rich- 
ards are spending several days 
yth friends in Liberty, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Effie Hogriffe en- 
tertained several friends with a 
Christmas dinner. 

Plattsburg 

Cad Sullivan and wife were the 
guests of Cal Williams last Satur- 
day night, and Sunday. * 
^Tom Hensley and Leslie Sebree 
spent a few days last week with 
Wm. Worford and wife at Cleves. 
Ohio. 

Hebron 

,The ball given Tuesday night at 

ie hall under the excellent man- 
cement of Will Crisler and L. D. 
McGlasson was well attended. 

Dr. and Mrs. L. C. Hafer, of Boyd 
Station spent the holidays with 
tteir parents at this place. ^ . 

* Belleview 

Nat Carpenter, wife and Miss 
Virginia Snyder, of and near Bur- 
luigton, were visiting at the home 
of their grandmother, Mrs. Mary 
Corbin a couple of days last week. 
*Atty. O. M. Rogers, of Erjanger, 
was here a couple of days last 
week visiting his parents :and 
brothers. 
■ Hathaway 

W. G. McElroy and sister, Mrs. 
Fannie Franks, went to Risiag Sun 
1 ist Tuesday on a shopping toiir. 

Mrs. H. O. Adams, who has been 
tgsiite ill with pneumonia is con- 
valescing, i 
Walton J 

The Misses Bessie Powers, Hope 
and Rose Whitson t pretty girls, of 
i erona, are visiting friends hera. 
*Mrs. John Stamler" entertained 



the young people with a delightful 
Christmas party on Wednesday in 
compliment to their son, Roy Dun- 
can, who is at home this winter. 
Richwood 

J. T. Powers gave a delightful 
hop at his home Christmas night. 

Wm. Lancaster and wife, of Wil- 
liamstown, Mrs. Fannie Snow and 
Miss Bentie, of Covington, were 
guests of relatives here. 
Pt. Pleasant 

Miss Lucile Rucker, who has 
been at home for the holidays, has 
returned to Hamilton college. 

Miss Virginia Riggs entertained 
a number of her friends at dinner 
Thursday. 

Limaburg 

Misses Lillie and Nora Ryle vis- 
ited their brother, Dr. Ryle, of 
Big Bone, last Friday. 

Miss Annie Crigler has returned 
from Bellefontaine, Ohio, bringing 
with her Miss Ottie Hoffman. 
Constance 

Frank McGlasson and wife are 
the proud parents of a twelve- 
pound girl. 

Capt.. Henry Kottmyer's youngest 
child has been very sick. 

v Idlewild 

Mrs. Fannie Randall and Miss 
Pearl Botts were guests of Mrs. 
Thomas Whitaker a few days last 
week. 

Mrs. George Walton dined sever- 
al of her friends last Tuesday, as 
did Mrs. Wm. Hedges. 

Verona 

John E. Roberts and friend Fred 
Smith, after spending the holidays 
here, returned to Asbury College, 
Wilmore, Wednesday. 

Walter Fling and wife were pre- 
sented with a big Christmas pres- 
ent, a fine girl. 

Florence 

Mrs. Susan Wilhoit, of Coving- 
ton spent the holidays with her 
son, James Wilhoit. 

Mrs. Ben Osborne and children 
spent last week with her mother 
in Cincinnati. 

Taylorsport 

John Dye and wife are sick with 
severe colds. 

Adam Reeves and wife, of Cin- 
cinnati, are visiting at Wm. Losey's 






( 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

the first man yon meet. 




^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 






.! 



FULL CREDIT 



g= given on , 

g ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES J 

1 TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 1 



§5= Phone ERL. 87 

m 



Ambulance Service 

liiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiilEE 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 






that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP&STITH 



AMBULANCE 
SERVICE \ 



FUNERAL HOME 

PHONE 
FLORENCE 13 







LET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 



r . twu^. nam f • l *j i ,i-i ^TtWi 



*■ 



•v-- 




f 



/ 







THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



Z=±t 




iliiimiiiiiiiinnmiimimiirniimmiiiiiii 

tlTH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

ii'in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii 

T. Sgt. Thprman Wolfe, who is 
statl jned at j Tucson, Arizona as 
AerLl Engineer instructor spent 
a two weeks' furlough with his 
parjOts, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
WolM, of Walton. 



R\ fsell Lee Horton S 2/c, U. S. 
S. B rnes S. Div., Fleet Post Office 
San, "rancisco, Calif., writes: "Just 
a fe, i lines to let you know I am 

ing your paper and sure en- 
. . I would like to say hello 

I my friends in Boone County 
to thank all of you for the 
splendid way you remembered me 
on ny birthday and Christmas. I 
coul n't ask for a better Christmas 
in tkj Navy. ... I am looking for- 
waraftto the day when we can re- 
turnShome to stay. . . . It's time for 
the fights to go out so guess I had 
better close. Thanks again 
for he paper, I read just about 
ever line of it when I come in. 
Sod times I have about six pap- 
ers I siting for me." 

I 

ThA following are changes of ad- 
dresses for our boys in service: 

W-Sgt. Robert F. Horton, ASN 
35460797, APO 12641, care Postmast- 
er, San Francisco, Calif. 

Pf ; , Ferda Gi Gruelle, 35675370, 
Com any B., 152nd Infantry, APO 
9198; teare Postmaster, San Fran- 
cises' Calif. 

P# Harold V. Gruelle, 35454588, 
1082gai Engineer Utility Detach- 



ment, APO 678, care Postmaster, 
New York, N..Y. 

Fort Knox, Ky. — Upon orders of 
Ma]. General Charles L. Scott, 
Acting Commanding General of the 
Armored Command, a new class of 
soldier students had reported at 
the Armored School today to take 
special course in the Wheeled Ve- 
hicle Department. 

Among the new students is Cpl. 
William Lytle Smith, of Erlanger, 
Ky., son of Raymond R. Smith, of 
Burlington, R. 2. ■ 

The Armored School", of which 
Brig. Gen. Joseph A. Jolly is com- 
mandant, trains the thousands of 
officer and enlisted technicians who 
perform the specialist tasks in the 
Army's mobile, powerful armored 
divisions. One of the \ largest 
technical schools in the world, it 
graduates several times more stu- 
dents each year than the largest 
civilian universities. 

The school operates on two sev- 
en-hour shifts six days a week. 
Men on the first shift rises at 4:30 
a. m. and are in their shops and 
classrooms at 6 o'clock. As they 
leave at 1 p. m., the second shift 
marches in behind them and 
works until 8. 

The Wheeled Vehicle Department 
trains the students mechanics in 
the intricacies of keeping peeps 
jeeps, trucks and scout cars rolling 

in combat. 

» » » 

Mr. and »irs. Eck Wallace have 
received word that their son Pvt. 
John Wallace has been moved from 
Australia to an island somewhere 
in the Southwest Pacific. His new 
address is Pvt. John Wallace 



Tobacco Prices 

KENTON HOUSE 

COVINGTON, KY. 

Dec. 7 $47.75 per Hundred Average 

>ec. 8 49.10 per Hundred Average 

|J)ec. 9 , 45.20 per Hundred Average 

TDec. 10 47.94 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 13 48.58 per Hundred Average 

; Dec. 14 46.52 per Hundred Average 

j Pec 15 ., 49.55 per Hundred Average" 

|Vpec. 16 45.55 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 17 .i 46.68 per Hundred Average 

tec. 20 .'. 44.74 per Hundred Average 

fDec. 21 ll 43.21 per Hundred Average 

Dec. 22 ... 43.74 per Hundred Average 



s. 



Prices on the Covington Market are as high 

as any in the Burley Belt. 

1 

NO WAITING SALES EVERY DAY 



NTON LOOSE LEAF 
i TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

2nd & Scott Sts.,Covington. Phone HEm. 3552 

HERBERT WHITLEY, Gen. Mgr. 
^DAVE GAINES and JOE DUNCAN, Auctioneers 



35663224, 873rd Ord. H. A. M. {Co). 
APO 927, care Postmaster, San 
Francisco, Calif. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace" have also 
received word that their older son 
is stationed in Georgia. His ad- 
dress is Pvt. George T. Wallace, 
ASN 35-878,113 Co. D., 1st Trng. 

Bn., 4th Plat., Camp Wheeler, Gai 

* • • 

The following letter was received 
from Pvt. John W. Kittle, Co. K. 14 
Inf., APO 360, Camp Carson, Colo: 

"A few lines tp thank you for 
the Boone County Recorder. I have 
been sometime writing, but I have 
been so busy. I certainly enjoy re- 
ceiving the paper as it helps me 
keep up with my friends at home 
and the boys in service. I write 
to some of the boys. 

"I am the only Boone County 
boy here since* Jack Rector left. I 
have never heard from him and 
don't know his address. 

"I have just finished reading The 
Recorder. I get it often, but they 
didn't give you my complete ad- 
dress." 

Ed. Note-*We are publishing 3 the 
address you was concerned about: 
Pet. Jack D. Rector, Co. B. 237th 
Engrs. (C) Bn., ASN 35680707. APO 
9029, care postmaster, New York, 
N. Y. 

* * * 

Eliston Rector and wife received 
word December 23, 1943, that their 
son Jack, had arrived safely in 
North Africa. His address is Pvt. 
JackD. Rector, 35680707, Co. B., 237 
Eng. (C) Bn., APO 9029, care Post- 
Master, New York, N. Y. 

• • • 

Edward P* Holmes, Florence, Ky., 
recently inducted into the United 
States Army has been sent forward 
from the Reception Center ^at Ft. 
Thomas, Ky., to 65th Infantry Di- 
vision, Camp Shelby, Miss. 

• * • 

Pfc. Chas;. F. Hollis, 207th Q. 
M. Bkry. Co., APO 518, care Post- 
master, New York, N. Y., writes: 
"Ive been wanting to write sooner 
to let you know that The Recorder 
has caught up with me again, and 
I am very glad to be reading it 



once more. I must say this, al- 
though I can't write much about 
the place where I am, that what 
I have seen of England it is a pret- 
ty country. Naturally, however, it 
can't compare to Boone County 
where Mary Ellen, the baby and 
many friends I have known are. 
That is what makes a fellow ap- 
preciate the newspaper from home. 
. . . Reading about how well things 
are back there and what the other 
boys have to say from other parts 
of the world. . . . Tell all the folks 
I'm doing fine and it shall be good 

to see all of them again." 

• * • 

Sgt. William H. Sebastian, ASN 
35675367, APO 449, Co. L. 393 Inf., 
Camp Maxey, Texas, spent a brief 
furlough with friends at Peters- 
burg. This was his first furlough 
in eight months. He has gained 
twenty . pounds since entering the 

service. 

• » * 

Pvt. Emmett "Skeets" Louden, 
170th Med. Bn., 610th Ch| Co., APO 
403 A^ care Postmaster, Shreve- 



Re- 




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OFFICES WITH 

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613-15 Madison Ave., Covington 
SINCE 1857 



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Priced to fit any pocKetbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious cold wave. 

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271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
Open Evenings 



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weight. Because of this natural shape and snug heel fit, 
heels cannot roll in or out, weak feet are straightened to 
natural position, assuring foot comfort. 

PEOPLES SHOE STORE 

"Where Foot Comfort Begins" 

814-816 Madison Ave. Covington, Ky. 

Three Foot Comfort Specialists In Daily Attendance 



port, La., writes: 

"I have been receiving The 
corder weekly since September and 
I certajnly do appreciate it. I have 
been in Louisiana on maneuvers 
since September and that weekly 
contact with the events at home 
is really a looked forward to oc- 
casion. It not only keeps me up 
on the county news, but also on 
the whereabouts of many of my 
friends in the service. 

"As far as I know, there are no 
other follows here from Boone 
County, although I have met sev- 
eral from Kenton and Carroll. 

"As I mentioned above, I am on 
maneuvers — the place the soldier 
gets his first practical training 
We all realize that maneuvers are 
just a game, in one sense of the 
word, but a lot of valuable lessons 
are learned here. Maneuvers helps 
to adjust you to life in the field 
and in a minor way to a few of 
the hardships you will endure 
when you start to play for keeps. 
t have found it a good experience 
and one which I will be glad to 
have had, if and when I am sent 
across. 

"Thanks again for The Record- 
er, and I'll close for now." 

Jr • • • 

Word.'tias been received here 
fronyCpl. Edwin H. Walton, of 
Camp Lee, Va., that he is now at 
Tulsa, Okla., where he will enter 
the Quartermaster Petroleum 
School for a course in inspection. 
After completing the course he 
will return to Camp Lee. His ad- 
dress is Cpl. Edwin H. Walton 
35685002, 939 Petroleum Product 
Laboratory Unit, Q. M. Petroleum 
School, Oklahoma University, Tulsa 

Oklahoma. 

* • * 

Pfc. Roy D. S'fcothorn. Co. A, 
801st M. P. Bn., APO 927, care 
Postmaster, San Francisco, Calif., 
writes: 

"Thought I would write you a few 
lines to thank you for The Boone 
County Recorder. It's just like 
getting a letter from home. 

"I am still in Australia, but it 
is not a bad place to be, but I sure 
would like to be back home. The 
weather here is hot during the 
day and cold at night. 

"I- would like to write you more 
about this part of the world, but 
can't. •• 

"Pete, I want to say thanks a 
million for The Recorder, it really 
means a lot to the boys in service 
and it» certainly is nice of you to 
send it to all of us and I wish to 
thank my friends for the many 
things 4;hey have done for the boys 

away from home." 

* • » 

The following letter was received 
from Pvt, William A. Holladay, with 
the U. S. Army: 

"I received my first issue of the 
Boone County Recorder, December 
3rd. It was just like a long letter 
from home, containing all the up- 
to-date news of my home county. 
I want to express my uttermost ap- 
preciation and thanks to you for 
sending me my home county pap- 
er. I hope to receive it, no mat- 
ter where I am sent. It sure is a 
morale building to all us Boone 
County boys in the armed services. 

"We realize that you home folks 
are backing us one hundred per- 
cent and we aim to fight in the 
same manner for you. 

"Thanks again, I sure appreciate 
your kindness, and some day we 
will come back to Boone County 

and all our friends." 

* * • 

Pfc. Everett E. Rogers, ASN 
35128174, Btry B. 932 F. A. Bn, APO 
464, care Postmaster, New York, N. 
Y., writes: "I have received two 
copies of The Recorder, and it sure 
is a help to a young man that is 
away from home to get the home 
paper. I read it from front to back 
and enjoy it. . . . I am some- 
where it Italy now. . . . Will thank 
you a lot if you will keep sending 

the paper to me." 

* • •' 

Pfc. Hobert Willoughby, Jr., Btry. 
C. 770 F. A. Bn., APO 403-A, care 
Postmaster, Shreveport, La., writes: 
"I have finally been sent on man- 
euvers. Our outfit is in the swamps 
of Louisiana. We are in a position 
on a pretty high and dry spot now, 
but you should have seen the 
swamp that we went through to 
get here. We didn't get stuck once 
thanks to the engineers who went 
ahead of us and built bridges and 
cleared. the way. ... I was home on 
a 10-day- furlough the first of No- 
vember and old Boone County sure 
looked good to me. I will be plenty 
glad when this war is over and we 



can all, who live in Boone dSunty, 
return there. ... I am writing this 
by firelight and it is gettinp low, 
so thanks a million for the laper 
each week. I certainly looL^ for- 
ward to reading it. . . . Tell all 
friends around Hebron, hello." 



my 



Pvt. Albert A. Hunt, stal oned 
at Camp Wheeler, Ga., writS: '-'I 
have been receiving your paper, 
and I do appreciate you send'ng It 
to me, for we are are always glad 
to hear some news from horn . . . 
Camp life is not near as njfep as 
our happy homes, but we are com- 
fortable here, and there is a war 
to be won, and we are each gl: d to 
do our part, that our homes ^may 
remain as they are and victory may 
soon be ours and a lasting eace 
may prevail over the whole world. 
. . . Camp Wheeler is a large c-unp, 
a regular city itself, located lght 
miles from Macon, Georgia. . . 
Thanks again for sending the yap- 
■er, for I do look forward to getting 
Jt.» 



• • • 



% 



Harry Cook, stationed at the 
Sioux Falls, S. D. TechnicaPSchool, 
writes: 

"Received my Recorder here Sun- 
day. As' a rule this is one day 
sooner than I usually got it in Lou- 
isville, but the other mail service 
here is not so good. Letters *,ake 
about five or six days to get 1 ere. 

^The weather is very milde, for 
this time of year. It only gets to 
about 20 above in , the night and 
then to about 40 degrees during the 
day. ' y 

"This coal smoke is the worst 
part about this camp. It is smoky 
here at times until it is difficult 
to breathe. 

"I haven't started to schoo as 
yet. Am hoping to start some me 
this week. Before starting I Xjjave 
to take a physical examination 
from the Flight Surgeon' to see if 
I can^aalify for aerial gunnery. 
L^«P6n*t pass so will only take radio 
to qualify me for a control tower 
operator. Will also have to qualify 
(63%) with the pistol (.45 calibre). 
I am still hoping to get through 
this course so I can join my outfit 
(61st Wing Troop Carrier) which 
will be at Sedalia A. A. B., War- 
rensburg, Mo., about the first of 
March. The sooner I get ou< of 
this hole the better. I have #iet 
several Kentucky and Cincinnati 
boys here at the club. 

"Was so sorry to hear about I xs. 
Souther. Thanks a lot for he 
paper Pete. It is like a long, bng 
letter from all the people at hc&ne. 
Wish I had Everett Cress' address 
so that I could write to him. Hope 
he gets to come home before long — 
he should with the malaria that 
long. 

"Went to church here Sunday 
and really had a fine spiritual 
meeting. We studied the Sunday 
School lesson, 10th Commandment, 
'Covetousness,' then preaching and 
communion. I hope to get to go 
back every Sunday. 

"Well, Pete tell everyone hello 
and will see you some day. Boy, Mie 



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pheasants are thick here. Wish you 
could be here to hunt." 

Ed. Note — We are giving you 
the address of Everett Cress, 6th 
Construction Bat. Co. C, care Fleet 
Post Office, San Francisco, Calif. 

• * • ~ 

Jimmie Masters, stationed in Mis- 
sissippi with the U. S. Army writes: 

"Have been receiving The Re- 
corder for the past ten months, and 
it's a swell paper. I really , enjoy 
reading it. It helps me find out 
just where all my friends are in 
the service and how they are get- 
ting along. 

"We just arrived at Nashville, 
Tenru, today for our maneuvers, 
anc I was sure glad to leave Miss- 
issippi, and- 1 hope my next move is 
still farther north. 

"I like the army fine, and it is 
really good for you, but I would 
rather be back in Boone County. 

"I will close now, and I thank 
you very much for sending me The 
Recorder and I look forward to 
getting it each week." 

• * * 

Robert Henry England A. S., Co. 
1630 U. S. N. T. S., Great Lakes, 
HI., writes: "I guess, you thought I 
didn't care much for The Recorder 
as I had not written to thank you 
for it. I have not had much time 
to write, but at least found time. 
I enjoy The Recorder very much, 
and it keeps me well posted as to 
what Is going in Boone County. I 



like to read the letters other boys 
in the service write. ... I am at 
Camp Green Bay but I am not in a 
Company with any of the boys from 
Boone County, but I see them once 
in a while. . . . Thanks again for 
The Recorder and I hope you keep 
up the good work." 



HEBRON 



Miss Irene Green, of North Bend, 
and Mrs. Marshall, of Covington, 
spent Saturday afternoon with 
Mrs. E. I. Rouse. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Baker, of 
Scotts Road, were Sunday after- 
noon' guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Baker. 

Miss Shirley Faulkner, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Faulkner, of 
this place and Pfc. David Lucas, 
of Bullittsville, were quietly marri- 
ed by Rev. Lucas, Saturday even- 
ing at 6 o'clock. Congratulations 
to this young couple. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Tanner spent 
the week-end at their home, here. 

Mrs. Robert Aylor has the flu. 

•Sterling Dickey received a letter 
from his brother, Pvt. Raymond 
B. Dickey, stating that he was in 
a hospital in North Africa. He pre- 
viously had been with the Fifth 
Army to Italy. 

Pfc. James Gilbert Dickey of 
Camp White, Oregon has been en- 
joying a furlough with relatives 
here. 



,/ 



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39 inches high, 12-inch stay FIELD FENCE and 4-point 

Cattle Barb Wire 

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John Deere Farm Machinery 
Milkers and Cream Separators. 

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and DeLaval 

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COVINGTON, KY. £ 



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THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



i —— ^— ■ 



"^ 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boont County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY f 3, 1924 



Idlewild 

Master Edward F. Helms, of Pet- 
ersburg spent Sunday witbl his 
friend, Mrs. Ben S. Houston. 

Miss Gene Miller, of Florence, 
was the mid-week tniesjt of .-Miss 
Frances Berksliire.; ' V-,. ; / '.^t 
Petersburg '. 

Mrs^ J. M. Grant spent last Fri- 
day in Aurora, at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. James Thompson. 

Mrs. Virgie Sullivan, of Bullitte- 
vflle, spent Sunday with her fath- 
er and family, Wood Sullivan,, Sr. 
Hebron ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rouse .and 
children spent Sunday^ with ,M*. 
and Mrs. Elmer Kelly, of Burling- 
ton. 

Mrs. Dora Garnett and Mrs.. Eliza 

Poston spent one day last week 

with Mrs. "Mary Baker and Mrs. 

Leo Weaver, of Lower River Road. 

Constance 

Born on Christmas Day to Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Moore, a fine 
baby girl. Mrs. Moore was form- 
erly Miss Dorothy Hyden, of Con- 
stance. 

Floyd Bolington and Rosie Peeno 



were married in Covington, Satur- 
day, December 15th. Rev. W. H. 
Carlisle performed the ceremony. 
Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. Charles Aylor and daughter 
spent Christmas Day with Mrs. Mat 
Rous , of Erianger. , 

Miss Eva Renaker had for her 
guest Christmas eve, Miss Mamie 
Robinson, of Richwood. 
Gunpowder 

N. C. Tanner and wife were din- 
ner guests of N. A. Zimmerman 
and wife, last Sunday. 

Mrs. B. D. Clore, of Erianger 
spent a day recently with her 
sister, "^irs. B. A. Floyd. 

Limaburg 
. Harold Beemon returned to col- 
lege at Springfield, Ohio, Tuesday, 
after spending the Christmas, hol- 
days with his parents. 

Mrs. Jim Pettit and daughter, 
Jessie, spent a few days last week 
With Mr. and Mrs. Zach Pettit of 
Covington. 

Mt. Zion 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Glacken, Mr. 
and Mrs. Elmer Glacken and fam- 
ily spent Sunday with Mrs. Sarah 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 

BABY CHICKS 

We Sell DR. SALSBURY'S Poultry Remedies, 
Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

512 Pike St. IWFJB&HB&T HEmlock 9168 

Covington - Open Sundays Till Noon 



USED CAR BARGAINS 

1936 CADILLAC ; . , ••••• $ 3 25 

1939 HUDSON 4-DOOR -$695 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN, new paint $275 

1938 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN , : . v ...$445 

1941 PLYMOUTH 4-DOOR SEDAN I $875 

1937 FORD COUPE .....$295 

1937 CHRYSLER SEDAN „...$295 

1936 NASH SEDAN ....:........ $265 

1939 DODGE 4-DOOR SEDAN ...$695 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 

1937 PACKARD COUPE $345 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN >** .......$245 

1937 PLYMOUTH SEDAN ... $350 

1938 WILLYS SEDAN :...$325 

1937 WILLYS SEDAN :...... ..$275 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. . Covington COlonial 3884 



learance 



\J H Lb ■ ■ 



4 Ft. Flock Feeders, with stand; regular $0.79 

$3 - 29:reducedt0 ' • ; •- 

4 Ft Floor Type Flock Feeders ; $ fl .79 

regular $2.35; reduced to * 

Tobacco Canvas; 9 ft wide, 100 ft. long. : $7.25 

6-gallon Stone Jars , .....$1.39 

4-gallon Stone Churns ,....$1.89 

Electric Fence Controllers $11.95 

350-Chick Electric Brooders $24.50 

Super Hatch Incubators, 400-egg „.$26.50 

Sheep Mineral Blocks, 25 Jbs $ 1.53 

A & D Feeding Oil; galloa h*. « ...$ 1.98 

Mineral Hog Feeders ...$ 9.60 

500-Chick Coal Brooders ,..$17.25 

3 and 5-Gallon Galvanized 

Fountains ■...,.» $1.85 and $ 2.30 

26-Inch Hog Fence; 20 tods $ 6.50 

34-Quart Milk Coolers $ 7.75 



SEARS FARM STORE 

1& WEST SEVENTH ST. 

. HEmlock 2004 



COVINGTON 



Robinson, of Richwood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Surface and son 
spent Sunday with Alan Utz and 
family, j. . • 

■jjr.i. ■' Hopeful 

Albert; Robbihs and family and 
Will Snyder and wife spent Sun- 
day with Robert Snyder and fam- 
ily, of Florence. 

Owen. Aylor and wife visited Mil- 
ton Beemon and wife, Sunday. 
Union 

Mrs. J. B. Dickerson visited with 
her sister, Mrs. J. R. Williams, 
several days last week. 

Mrs. J. T. Bristow entertained 
Sunday, Miss Eugenia Riley, Dor- 
etta and Ralph' Barfow and Wm. 
Townsend. 

Rabbit Hash 

Hubert Clore and family spent 
Saturday at Mr. Clore's father's, 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Stephens. 

Mrs John Ryle is entertaining 
her mother »• Mrs Mamie Stephens, 
of Rising Sun, Ind. 

Waterloo 

Miss Edna and Erma Feely spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Fleek. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Pope, son and 
daughter., and Mrs. Charles L. 
Kelly," . spent one day last week 
with Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Aylor. 
Florence 

Charles Clarkson and wife en- 
tertained his brother John and 
wife, of Covington at his home on 
Burlington pike. 

Miss -Lucille Wilson, of Union 
spent the latter part of the week 
with Mrs. Owen Bradford. 
I Burlington 

Clifton Roberts, Walter Brown, 
and Jerry Fowler, of Covington, 
spent Saturday night and Sunday 
with relatives in Burlington. 

R. Leei Huey, of Big Bone, was 
the guest of his sister, Mrs. J. E. 
Gaines and family, the latter part 
of last week. 

Denzil Carpenter, who is teach- 
ing in the high school at Parsons, 
W. Va., spent the holidays with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. 
Carpenteir. 



't 



HILL TOP 



Mary Gross spent one day last 
week with Mrs. Alice McGlasson, 
of Hebron. 

Mrs. Mlinnie Dolehi and brother 
spent Christmas Day with hjr sis- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Searp, 
of Bromley. 

Mrs. Wrh. Bock called on Mary 
C. Gross and Minnie Dolehi, last 
Monday. 

Mary C. Gross ana friend spent 
Christmas Eve with Mr. and Mrs. 
Virgil Heist, of Constance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bicknover and 
father of Westwood, Ohio, spent 
Sunday with Minnie Dolehi and 
brother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
daughter were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Orin Edwards, and 
family, of Big Bone. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
daughter spent New Year's Day 
with Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff 
and daughter, of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Anderson 
and children took supper Wednes- 
day night with Reuben Asbury and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmo Jergens and 
daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Herbstreit and little daughter 
Wanda, were guests New Year's 
Day at a family dinner given at 
the home of their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Herbstreit at Pannels 
Bottom. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
daughter Carol Ann entertained 
New Year's evening with a lovely 
dinner for the following guests: 
Mr. and Mrs. Huff, of Florence 
and Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, from 
Bullittsville. 

Cpl. William Turner has return- 
ed to Fort Bliss, Texas, after 
spending a* week's furlough with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Barney 
Turner. 

Frankie Dolwick left for North- 
port, Mich., Sunday evening to 
resume his school duties again, 
having spent the holidays s with his 
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Davis 
and other relatives. 
- Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas 
spent Thursday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Rawls, of Coving- 
ton. Mr. Rawls will leave Tuesday 
to enter the armed service. 

Wm. Bock, Casper Hempfling 
and Mrs. Emily Drilling are on the 
sick list. Glad to report others 
much improved. « , 

Robert England, who is station- 
ed at Great Lakes, called on the 
A. T). Hunters, Sunday. 

Sympathy is extended from this 
community to Bert Jones and 
mother In the passing of then- 
loved one. 

The following is the new address 
of John Victor Barbour, nephew of 
Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Newland: S. 
2/c, U. 3. S. Porterfield, D. D. 682 
care Fleet Post Office, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. He would like to hear 
from his friends. 

Virgil Haberle, of Illinois is vis- 
iting his. cousins, the Jergens and 
Herbstreit families. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Anderson 
and children and Mrs. A. D. Hunt- 
er were guests New Year's Eve of 
the W. D. Carders. 

Mrs. Mary Hays and son were 
among the several guests who were 
entertained at the home of her 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Hays, 
Saturday evening at Hebron. 

Mrs. Mary Gross spent the week 
end with her daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edgar Herrington and fam- 
ily, of Florence. 

I hope every one has resolved to 
send in items. It means so much 
for our boys who are away. 



■ii 1 1 iitiii i iitin 1 1 ii iimi in 1 1 tn tin mi initiit 

AT THE 

Gayety Theatre 

iiiiiiiiiiiiimmiimiiiiiiiiMimimiiiiiimi 

TONIGHT AND FRIDAY 

An authentic sound track, re- 
corded during the 1940 blitz of 
London, has been incorporated in 
the early sequences of M-G-M's 
"The Adventures of Tartu" pro- 
duced in England by Irving Asher 
and directed by Harold Bucquet. 

The detonation of Nazi bombs, 
the wail of sirens, the crackle of 
flames and crash of falling walls 
were caught by a daring sound 
technician during the height of 
the Luftwaffe's attack on the Brit- 
ish capital. It is heard in scenes 
where Robert Donat, the star, is 
endeavoring to remove the fuse, 
from a delayed action aerial obmb, 

during the height of a bombing. 

• * • 

SATURDAY 

A cattle stampede, said to be 
one of the* most exciting movie 
events in recent pictures, is a col- 
orful highlight of Universal's 
"Frontier Badmen," which comes 
to the Gayety, Saturday. The 
thrilling incident supplies a sur- 
prise climax to a story dealing 
with a crusade against lawlessness 
during pioneer days. 

Robert Paige, Anne Gwynne, 
Noah Beery, Jr., Diana Barrymore 
and other notables are featured in 

the adventurous new picture. 

• • • 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

Eleanor Powell "goes Western" in 
her latest screen role, and twirls a 
lariat « la Will Rogers. But in 
this case she does it in time to 
music. The lariat dance is a high- 
light in M-G-M's "I Dood It," in 
which she co-stars with Red Skel- 
ton in a musical funfest. Profes- 
sional cowboys taught her to 
handle the ropes — the dance is her 
own idea. 

It is one of a series of gay bits 
of entertainment in the side- 
splitting comedy of a pants' press- 
er who marries an actress. Vin- 
cente Minnelli directed with a cast 
that includes Richard Ainley, Pat- 
ricia Dane, Thurston Hall, Sam 
Lewene, John Hodiak, Morris Ank- 
rum and Butterfly McQueen, Jim- 
my Dorsey and his band are also 

featured. 

• * • 

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY 

Curious guy, this Eddie Albert, 
co-star with honey-blonde Anne 
Shirley in Paramount's "Lady 
Bodyguard," the romantic comedy 
thrill coming to the Gayety. 

Eddie has a habit of getting up 
at three o'clock ir the morning to 
go fishing. Hell have fish for 
breakfast seven days a'week when 
he's in the mood — and still get to 
the studio in titeie for work. 



CONSTANCE 



Mr. and Mrs Frank Fisher and 
daughter entertained with a din- 
ner Christmas Day. Guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. George Kottmyer and 
Mr. and Mrs. George Casper and 
son Jeffry. 

Mr Harry Wischmeyer, of Cin- 
cinnati, O., spent Sunday with 
his sister, Mrs. Lena Fritz. 

Pvt. Ralph Prabel, of Aberdeen, 
Md., spent the Christmas week- 
end with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Prabel 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Porter Huey, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Huey and 
Miss Nancy Huey called on Mrs. 
Duncan Huey and daughter dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays 

Ralph Lents spent the past week 
in Frankfort squirrel hunting. 

Mrs. George Loze and Mrs. 
Bertha Lane and Miss Nell Hemp- 
fling have been on the sick list. 

Miss Olivenell Kottmyer spent 
the week-end with her grandpar- 
ents in Covington. 

Misses Minnie and Josie Wisch- 
meyer of Cincinnati, spent Christ- 
mas week-end with their sister, 
Mrs. Lena Fritz. 

Congratulations to Mr and Mrs. 
George Allan Darby on the arrival 
of a daughter on New Year's Day 
at Booth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Helton en- 
tertained relatives during the hol- 
idays. . 

Mrs. Bertha G'Schwindt and 
daughter of Chicago, HI., spent 
New Year's Day with Mr. and Mrs 
Charles Kottmyer and f anaily. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kottmyer 
spent Christmas Day with Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Fisher and daughter 

Anyone having news items for 
this column please leave at Geo. 
Kottmyer's store by noon Monday. 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Staff Sgt. Harold Kilgour is en- 
joying a furlough with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Kilgour. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Campbell 
and son have moved from the 
Crisler farm to the house owned 
by Mr. Court Hollis. 

Lawrence Emerson Wilson of the 
Navy is spending his furlough 
with his wife, Mrs. Evelyn Wilson. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Helton and 
son Billy spent the holidays with 
relatives of Harlan, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Kilgour 
entertained Thursday evening for 
S. Sgt. Harold Kilgour, Lawrence 
E. Wilson S 2/c and wife, Mrs. 
Evelyn Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Moore and family and Mr. and 
Mrs. John Kilgour and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle en- 
tertained Wednesday night -for 
Seaman Lawrence Wilson and wife 



and Seymour Wilson and wife. 

Mr.- and Mrs. John Kilgovr vis- 
ited her parents of Taylor Mill Rd., 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Craddock 
and family called on Mr. and Mrs. J: 
Franklin Ryle, Friday night, 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Wilson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and daugh- 
ter Jean, Seaman and Mrs. Law- 
rence Wilson and Richard Jackson 
visited Miss Jessie Wilson of. Hyde 
Park, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour and 
daughters entertained Seaman and 
Mrs.- Lawrence Wilson, JTiday 
night. 

. . ] ' f ,' , - . . 



HEBRON 



McVILLE 



Mr. and 1 Mrs. William Clot* and 
family, of Norwood,. 6., spe*it the 
week-end with Mr. and Mbs. Les 
Ryle and famfly.'Miss Bett* Ryle 
returned home With them * for a 
visit. 

Miss Rachel Pottinger spe^t her 
vacation with relatives in Paris, 
Ky., and Cincinnati, Q. I 

Mr. and Mrs. Lillard Scott and 
Vera Dean were among gues" s et\ a 
family dinner Christmas itjj at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. T&alph 
Cason and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wol.e and 
Mrs. Mary Tandy were guests Sat- 
urday to a turkey dinner it the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Clore. Other guests were Mrs. 
Lutie Aylor, Florence and^ Mrs. 
Alice Aylor, of Belleview. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Kruse and 
family entertained for their family 
Christmas Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oakley Lambjrt, of 
Cincinnati, O., spent Saturday and 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. JJlmer 
Jarrell. 

Miss Carolyn Cropper was a, guest 
this week-end In the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Rogers and fam- 
ily- 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wol'e en- 
tertained the following guest v New 
Year's Eve with a buffet lunatieon: 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Clore. of 
Hebron; Mr. and Mrs. Alvin JJlore, 
Burlington; Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Clore, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers 
and daughter, Mrs. Martha "Felt- 
man and daughter, of Belleview; 
and Mrs. Mary Tandy. 

Dinner guests of Mr. and fcars. S. 
B. Scott, Sunday were Mr. and 
Mrs. Lillard Scott and Vera Dean, j 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Scot - and j 
sons and Mr. and Mrs. Will Egown. i 

Paris Kelly, of Lawrenceburg, j 
Ind., spent the holidays wit'i his, 
family here. ^ 

Mrs. Mae Williamson, Mrs. Sadie ! 
Hightower, • Mart Williamson, of 
Dayton and Mrs. Ivan Norris have; 
been visiting relatives here. • • 

Mrs. Mabel Abdon entertained 
the following guests at a trrkeyi 
dinner Sunday: Mr. and Mrs. Harry, j 
Shlnkle, Of Waterloo and Mr ' and j 
Mrs. Jesse Louden, Jr., and son. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Conner and 
daughter Mary spent- Christmas 
Hay with Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn 
Hempfling and childreiryiear Tay- 
iorsport. 

Miss Minnie Baxter and Chas. 
Beall, of Florence spent Sunday 
Dec. 26 with Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bak- 
er. 

Quite a number here have had 
the flu during the past two weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Conner and 
son. spent Christmas Day with her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. W. B Cotton, 
of Latonra. 

Miss Shirley Faulkner, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Faulkner 
and Pfc. David Lucas, son of Rev. 
and Mrs. Noble Lucas were quietly 
united in marriage Saturday even- 
ing Dec. 18, at six o'clock at the 
home of the groom's parents. Miss 
Marilyn Garnett and Harry Lee 
Aylor were the attendants. Con- 
gratultions to this young couple. 

A shower was given at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. S. B.Vaulkner on 
Tuesday night, Dec. 2i for Pfc. and 
Mrs. David Lucas 

Mr and Mrs. Geo. H. Riley, of 
Louisville, spent a few days here 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles W. Riley, during the holi- 
days. 

Elmer Tanner, Robert England 
and Lawrence Wilson came home 
last week from Great Lakes, HI., 
for a week's visit. 

Mr. ana Mrs. c. T. Tanner .en- 
tertained Sunday with a family 
dinner party. Guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. James Tanner and two sons, 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Tanner. Earl 
Tanner of Erianger and Claude 
and Lowell Tanner of Taylorsport. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Dickey 
were Sunday dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell Dickey, of Lud- 
low. 

Word has been received from Cpl. 
Bobby Garnett that he has been 
moved from Florida to a camp in 
New York. 

Miss Mary Marshall student 
nurse from Christ Hospital spent 
a few days last week with Miss 
Marilyn Garnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Hays en- 
tertained New Year's evening for 
Mrs. Mary Hays and sons Bobby 



and Herman, of Hill Top; Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Reeves and children of 
Constance; and Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
ton and son, of Covington. 

Nick Furnish from Great Lakes, 
HI., spent .Christmas Day with his 
wife. 

Miss Alline Stephens, of Cincin- 
nati, spent a few days with Mr. 
and Mrs. M. M. Garnett. 

Anyone having news for this 
column, please, call Hebron 114 it 
will be appreciated. 



HOME ORCHA RDS THRIVE 

IN EASTERN KENTUCKY 



* U ir/i >\* : .■■■■ ! ■ . ;.' 

Small home orchards loaded with 
choice apples were seen at a re- 
cent meeting of fruit, growers at 
the farms of Virgil Slone and Ron- 
ald Harris in Winifred community, 
Johnson county. 

The Slone orchard of about 60 
trees was estimated to be carrying 
1,000 bushels of apples, and the 
crop of some individual trees was 
considered worth $100. 

Farmers in Winifred community 
cooperate in the production of 
fruit and poultry. Trees are fert- 
ilized and sprayed according to the 
latest methods of fruit production. 
None of the orchards contain more 
than 100 trees. 

Contrary to the Ideas of some 
persons, these successful fruit 
growers have their orchards on 
rich bottomland. "I can't afford 
to grow field crops on bottomland 
when I can grow fruit,'" Mr: Slone 
told the visitors. "One tree will 
produce enough apples to pay for a 
whole truckload of corn." 

Fruit growers, farmers and 
county agents from several coun- 
ties attended the meeting, which 
was arranged by County Agent 
Howard Burdine in the interest of 
promoting better "fruit growing. 
Also attending were W. W. Magill, 
W. D. Armstrong and C. E. Harris 
of the Kentucky Experiment Sta- 
tion, and J. M. Feltner of London, 
field agent in 4-H club work in 
Eastern Kentucky. 



\i»vi:itriM\<. 

look Tin* Tom I ;n Out 
Of I in* < r;ii'k«»r Itarrcl 



COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
47 Dixie Highway . -:- Erianger, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

WAYNE FEEDS — RED JACKET COAL 

READY MIXED CONCRETE 

CONCRETE BLOCKS 



"» Jl ■«-- 




^uaaeifohd 



HOW TO GET MORE LIGHT FROM YOUR PRESENT EQUIPMENT 



i 




-. 




• 










■ 

• 

1 










Keep Lam p s Turned Off 
In Unoccupied Rooms 

Leaving lamps burning in unoccupied rooms not only wastes 
light but shortens the Mfe of lamp bulbs, which use tungsten 
-*- a critical war material. 7 irn off all lamps and fixtures 
promptly when not in actual ose. Your lamp bulbs will stay 
brighter longer, you'M get nj re useful light at less expense 
and you'll help conserve electricity and vital materials for the 
war effort. 

SIX OTHER WAYS TO CONSERVE LIGHT 

| Remove and clean lamp bulbs ' J Avoid direct glare from lamp 
and lamp bowls regularly. Dry bulbs by using shades deep 

thoroughly before using again. enough and wide enough. 

C Arrange furniture so one lamp 
•* can serve two people. But- be 
sure lamp is not too far away from 
either person. 

C Eliminate amber or flame-tint 
w " bulbs. Inside-frosted white 
bulbs of same wattage give much 
more light. 



4 Keep shade linings light. Clean 
or brush regularly. /Repaint or 
reline dark-colored paper or parch- 
ment shades. 

J Sit dose enough to the lamp 
•" to get all the help it can give 
your eyes. 



COMMUNITY 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

I Mil I AT- 







'I * 



1 



« 



warn 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURUNGTON, KENTUCKY 






■■•■■■»■■*■» 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



I 



flllllllllllllllll^ 

I Seen And Heard Around 1 



iblirfa bra; gailicjm 



g I ne County beat 

$ liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiii 

H Mrs. Bess Rouse was ill several Thomas Hensley, of Louisville, 

^ risnc HnriniT fha VinHHnvs snent several davs durine the hol- 



i Misa Carolyn Cropper enter- 
tained the Intermediate B. T. U. 
with a party at her home, last 
Thursday evening. 



I 



days during the holidays 



Mrs. William Huey was ill several 
days last week. 
- • J 5 Mrt viu'jy.M /i — J 



Mr- and Mrs: -Lloyd Weaver and 
son w^re Tuesday evening dinner 
guests of Mrs. Bttie Weaver. 
■ : •; -■ ' ' a 

Mr. and Mrs. Newton Sullivan 
and- daughter Nancy, were ill sev- 
eral days during the holidays. 



Mtes Joan Yelton spent *e*«al 
days recently with friends in Pet- 
ersburg. 



Miss Mary Bess Jarrell spent last 
week-end with Miss Emma Mae 
Brady, Of Belleview. 

_ 

Mr. and Mrs. Redmond, of Battle 
Creek, Mich., called oh friends and 
relatives here, one day last week. 



Mr. and Mrs. Keith Vice, of Lex- 
ington, were Sunday guests of Mr. 
: and Mrs. L. R. Vice and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Jones and 
£ family were guests Saturday, of 
I Mrs. Martha Jones. 



3 Mrs. Susie Stephens spent last 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Walt- 
er Hall and family, of Latonla. 



j 



Mrs. Levina Kirkpatrick enter- 
tained with a family dinner, 
U* Christmas Day. * ' 



t* 



Miss Carolyn Cropper spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Eddie 
Rogers, of Belleview. 



| Mr. arid Mrs. J: W. Kelly spent 
• one Sunday recently with Mr. and 
' Mrs. Howard Kelly, of Florence. 

Vt Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith and 
]L*Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rudicill, of 
r^WiUiamstown, were Christmas Day 
juests of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cason 
and Mr. and Mrs. William Rudicill 
and son. 



spent several days during the hol- 
idays with his parents, here. 



Mrs. Ted Graham of Coving- 
spent several days last week with 
Mrs. Charles Benson and other 
relatives herer 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter Graves and 
daughter/ of Erlanger spent Fri- 
day night and Saturday with 
friends, here. 



' Lt. Harry Holtzclaw of Dayton, 
Ohio, spent several days during 
the holidays with his Wife and 
children, here. 



Mr. and 'Mrs. Roscoe Akin and 
daughter were guests Christmas 
Day of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Akin 
and daughter; 



I ;-.■ 



Bobby Brown and Joe Smith 
spent several days last week with 
Mr. and Mrs. Al Stephens, of Pet- 
ersburg. 



Mr. and Mrs. Shelby Cowen, of 
Cincinnati, were Christmas Day 
guests of Miss Nell Martin and 
family. 



Miss Eunie Willis was a dinner 
guest Wednesday evening of Miss 
Mary Bess Cropper and Mrs. Harry 
Holtzclaw. 



Among those who are on the sick 
list are Mrs. Plummer Gulley, Mrs. 
Carrie Botts, Billy Smith, Mary A. 
Clore and Mrs. Dewey Crowder. 



Mrs. Mary Clore and Mrs. Walt- 
er Scothorn left Wednesday for 
Hollywood, Fla., to visit Mr. and 
Mrs. Boone Ryle. 



Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Glass and 
son, of Covington, spent Sunday 
after Christmas with Dr. and Mrs. 
M. A. Yelton.. 



Dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Klrtley Cropper and family, Friday 
evening were W. L. Cropper, Mrs. 
Harry Holtzclaw and two children 
and Miss Mary Bess Cropper. 

. . l, . ■' ■ ■ • tfrigg-g ... 

• Ret- J. A.. Kirtleyv.ofv.Murfjeees- 
boro, Term., spent Tuesday night 
with Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Cropper 
and family. He was called here, 
due to the death of his sister, Miss 
Dora Huey, of Cincinnati. 



Mrs, Annie Easton, of Coving- 
ton^ ^r.,and.M?s*. Robert Jones, of 
Florence and Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Jones, of Latonla, spent New Year's 
Day with Mrs. Maggie Easton and 
daughter of Oakley, O. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Weaver and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Renaker, 
Mrs. ^uTianx Townsend and family 
and Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Atwood, 
of Cincinnati, were dinner guests 
Christmas Day of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
P. Beemon and daughter, Myrtle. 



FLORENCE 



Mr. and Mrs. William Rudicill 
entertained Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe 
Akin and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Maurer, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. 
Stephens and Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Combs at dinner, last Tues- 
day evening. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Maurer en- 
tertained Mrs. Josie Maurer, Mr. 
and Mrs. Grover Jarrell and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Jarrell and daughter of Walton, 
and Edgar Maurer at dinner on 
Christmas Day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Elza Poston and 
family. Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Clore 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Kelly and Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Yel- 
ton and family were Christmas 
Day guests of Mr and Mrs. A. D. 
Yelton and family. 



tfXHXHXHXHXHXItXHXIIXHXIIXHXHXHXHXHXHXHZIIXHXHXIIXHXHXHXIIXK. 



1944 . . 



. We enter the New Year with- hope and determination— j 

HOPE of an early Victory for our ^soldiers on the wat front — j 
DETERMIN/TION to do our part for Victory. 

The E hrth War Loan Drive begins January 18th with a i 

quota of $5^>,000.00 for individuals in Boone County. Be ready ' 

with your subscription. x 



J 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

* BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

y 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 



f .XHXNXBtXHXMXHXHXHXHXHXHXNXHXHXHXHXHXHXMXHZHXHXHXHXHXK 



The Home Store 

iiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle ea. 6c 

PTZ POWDER * 1 lb. $1.60 

PTZ POWDER 5 lb. 7.50 



APPLES ./•-< ,-••■ pound 12c 

ORANGES ' .dozen 35c and 45c 

GRAPEFRUIT .? each 10c 



KALE 

HEAD LETTUCE 

CELERY 

CARROTS j.. 



'..., 



, 2 lbs. 25c 

each 15c 

bunch 15c 

.2 bunches 25c 



GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 quart, 14 oz i each 35c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, No. 2 can ...15c 

PINEAPPLE SLICED, No. 2Y 2 can. 36 points 28c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2, Sliced „ 30 points 25c 

PLUMS, No. ZVi can 15 points 20c 

PEACHES, No. Zy 2 halves 27 points 27c 

TOMATO JUICE, 1 quart, 14 oz 6 points 25c 

MIXED VEGETABLES, No. 2 14 points 13c 

PINK SALMON A •. . . . 14 points 27c 

SWEET POTATOES .20c 

NEW ORLEANS SYRUP .v. .-.gallon $1.35 

NEW ENGLAND SYRUP pint 25c 

KARO SYRUP, White pint 15c 

M - ' 

[ 47-Df. J2-IN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD FENCE rod 55c 

B6-D*. MED. WEIGHT 6-IS. STAY rod 50c 

FT. POULTRY FENCE rod 60c 

POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll !....$4.50 

00 .LBS. 24% DAIRY $3 15 

100 LBS. M% DAIRY .....'.....'. .$2.90 

^00 LBS. SHELLED CORN $2.90 

j 100 LBS'. GROUND WHEAT. ..........$2.90 

\ ffQOD HEATING STOVES l $5.50. to $10.00 

"!OAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3-room size. $45.00 

OAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4 -room size .$60.00 

ULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 




Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Jones, of 
Latonla, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Wil- 
liams and son, of Erlanger and 
Mrs. Maggie Easton and daughter 
of Oakley and Mrs. Margaret Wil- 
liams spent Christmas Day with 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jones, of 
Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Smith, of 
Toledo, O., and Mrs. Addie Smith, 
of Ft : Thomas, Mrs. Cora Buchert 
and daughter of Ft. Thomas, Mr. 
and Mrs. Dot Boggs and son David 
of Cold Springs, Mr. and Mrs. 
Toney Steffen, of Cold Springs, 
Fred Christ, of Erlanger, Mr. and 
Mrs. Herbert Snyder, Burlington, 
spent an enjoyable evening Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Ed- 
dins. While here Mr. Smith had 
his subscription moved up anoth- 
er year for The Recorder. 



Misses Lydia Pauline and Doro- 
thy Jane Aylor spent Christmas 
week-end with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Aylor. Miss Dorothy 
Jane has a nice position in the 
First National Bank in Cincinnati, 
while Lyda Pauline has been em 
ployed for sometime by the Ohio 
River Division Army Corps of En- 
gineers in the Huntington Bank 
building in Columbus, Ohio. 



Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Lucas enter- 
tained, with a turkey dinner Xmas 
Day iii honor of their children, 
Mr. anjd Mrs. J. C. Jones and son, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Lucas and fam- 
ily, Mr: and Mrs W. M. and son of 
Erlanger, Mr. and Mrs. Roy S. 
Thompson and Mr. and Mrs. Leon 
Ryle and daughter of Ft: Mitchell. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Huey, of 
Belleview have had as their guests 
during the past week, their son, 
James R. Huey, their grandson Jim 
Bob, and one of Mr. Huey's pupils, 
Floyd Ellis, of Rockfield, Ky. Mr. 
and Mrs. Huey and guests were 
entertained Friday by Mr. and Mrs. 
George Walton and family. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rey. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, Jan. 9, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 

Mornjing Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

The Hopeful Missionary Society 
will me|et at. the church on Mon- 
day, Jan. 10, at 8:00 p.' m. for 
their monthly devotional and busi- 
ness meeting. Mrs. Albert Rouse 
will present the topic for study. 

The Brotherhood will hold their 
monthly devotional and business 
meeting at the church on Monday, 
Jan. 10j at 8:00 p. m. Mr. David 
Tanner and Rev. Hauter will lead 
the devotions. 

The regular business meeting of 
the Church Council will be held at 
the church on Tuesday, Jan. 11, at 
8:00 p 



I- 

ION 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, Jan. 9, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Woodford Crigler, 
Supt. 

The Annual Congregational 
meeting will be held at the church 
this Saturday, January 8, starting 
with basket dinner at 12:00 noon. 
May we have a good attendance. 

The young people of the con- 
gregation will meet in the Sunday 
School room on Wednesday night, 
January 12, at 8.00 p. m. to or- 
ganize a Luther League. All in 
terested are invited to attend. 



Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wolfe, 
Mrs. Mary Tandy and Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin Clore, of Belleview 
were guests Saturday evening of 
of Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers and 
Evelyn Anne. Other guests were 
Mrs. Martha Feltman and daugh- 
ter. 



Mr. and Mrs.* Linnle Busby en- 
tertained, with a six t/clock din 
Bar on-iAw**?; evexptogij-in com 
pliment qJ Mr. and Mrs. John 
Caldon of Erlanger, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Tanner, Rev. Bruce Easter- 
day and wife of Erlanger. 

Friends of Mrs. Leslie Rose re 
gret to learn of her illness. 

The many friends of Albert Rose 
are glad he has returned home, 
after receiving his discharge from 
the army. 

Rev. Bruce Easterday and wife 
left Thursday for Akron, Ohio, to 
visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Easterday. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Stephens en- 
tertained with a dinner on New 
Year's Day in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. D. I. Tanner and family. 

Friends of J. P. Tanner regret 
to learn of his illness at his resi- 
dence. 

Mrs. Fannie Utz entertained on 
Sunday with a family dinner par- 
ly. Covers were laid for Mr. and 
Mrs. T. B. McHenry and daugh- 
ter Dorothy, IHr. and Mrs. D. I. 
Tanner and daughter Marie, Mr 
Lloyd Tanner and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Donald Tanner and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Frtizhugh 
Tanner and son and Mrs. Lennie 
Easton. A most enjoyable day was 
spent together. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wood Stephens en- 
tertained with a' six o'clock dinner 
on Sunday evening in compliment 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Crad 
dock and family -and Mr. and Mrs. 
Arnold Len Craddock, all of Heb- 
ron. - 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Dameron and 
son entertained with a turkey 
dinner Sunday, Dec. 26 in honor 
of Ed Borders and sons William 
and Woodrow and Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom Pierce and daughter. 

Miss Mildred Eddins, of Cincin- 
nati is spending two weeks with 
her grandmother, Mrs. Lee Eddins. 

Mrs. Ira Owen spent Monday in 
Cincinnati, shopping. 

Mrs. Wilford Aylor and son of 
Aurora. Ind., spent Friday with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Bethel. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Wingate and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Owen Bethel 
were Christmas dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Bethel 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Bethel had 
as dinner guests Saturday, Leroy 
Bethel, S 2/c, Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Bethel and family and Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell Bethel and fam- 
ily. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Bethel and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Franklin Bethel, of Bromley. 

Leroy Bethel, Seaman Second 
Class spent a five-day furlough 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Owen Bethel. He was supper 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Bethel, Thursday." 

Mr. and Hrs. Harold Conner were 
dinner guests Christmas Day of 
Mr. and Mrs. Denny and sons, of 
Lexington. 

- — MrsT Robert Houston and son 
have returned to their home in 
Price Hill, after passing a few days 
with Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hous- 
ton and family. 

Sympathy is extended to the 
families of Mrs. G. K. Kindard of 
this community. 

Sorry to report several on the 
sick list. 

Mrs. Geneva Souther entertain- 
ed with a six o'clock dinner party 
on New Year's in compliment of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and .son Billy Ray and Harold 
Victor. 

The large circle of friends of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Doyle, of 
Burlington Pike, will regret to learn 
that Mrs. Doyle is in Christ Hos- 
pital with a broken hip. 

Mrs. Emma Shields left recent- 
ly to enjoy several weeks' visit with 
her niece at Dayton, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Marshall 
entertained a group of friends at 
their lovely home on Lloyd Aye., 
Sunday evening, Dec. 26. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
entertained with a family dinner 
on Christmas Day. Those present 
were Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Tanner, 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Markesbery, Mrs. 
Geneva Souther and Gordon 
Souther. 

Ben Paddack left recently for 
Hebron to spend the winter with 
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Conner. 

Mrs. William Wessler, who 
has been enjoying a visit with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mose Rouse, 
has joined her husband, who is 
stationed at Pensacola, Fla., to 
spend a few weeks. - 

We are sorry to report that 
Charles Scott has. been quite ill. 
He is somewhat improved at this 
writing. h. , A 

Clem Kendall spent Christmas 
Day with his daughter, in Ludlow. 

Mrs. Lennie Easton has purchas- 
ed the Jim Rice property in Flor*' 
ence and will move there in the 
near future. 

Mrs. Virginia Kindoll spent Fri* 
day with her grandmother, Mrs. 
Amanda Tanner, of Price Pike. 

A family group assembled at the 
home of *.Mri and Mrs. Frank 
J. Piatt of Florence on Christmas 
Day for a holiday dinner. Those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
C. Piatt, Mr. and Mrs. Schulyer 
Turistall. Lockland, Mr. .Charles de- 
Valcourt Piatt, of Kansas City, Mo. 
and Private Eugene de Valcourt, 
Lockland of Fort Dix, N. J. 

Friends are sorry to hear that 
Leroy Cpurt of Florence is a pat- 
ient at St. Elizabeth Hospital, fol- 
lowing the amputation of his left 
arm near the elbow after it had 
been crushed last Monday in an 



accident at Stewart Iron Works Co. 
He is in fair condition at- this 
writing. 

Mrs. Nellie Crigler DeHa^jn, a 
former resident of Florence, passed 
' away at her home in' Lafayette, 
La., according to word received -by 
her sister, Mrs. Bessie Mitch 11, of 
Covington. Burial was in* the 
Florence Cemetery. 

On Christmas Day at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. f . Stephenson 
and son E. G., of Price Pil ?, a 
family group assembled for a tur- 
key dinner. A most enjoyable day 
was spent together: j- 

MrsH 'Minnie CiQre, Of Florence 
and Mr. «*«*•'' Mrs. Kirtley^Mc- 
Wethy and son, of Union spent 
Sunday atf Petersburg, guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hogan Ryle * and 
family. 

Quincy Mahorney and famjy of 
Price Pike had for guest during 
the holidays, his sister from Lex- 
ington. 

S. Robert England, who is' sta- 
tioned at Great Lakes, HI. is spend- 
ing a 15-day furlough with_ his 
wife, Mrs. England and other 5 rel^ 
atives. 

Mrs. Lennie Easton has Sole her 
farm on Price Pike to her "* son 
Kenneth Easton, of Verona and 
he will soon move there. * 

Friends will be sorry to learn 
that Mrs. Lloyd Aylor. is conjined 
to her home with an attack of flu. 

Mrs. Fannie Clarkson is recov- 
ering from a week's illness. ^ 

Henry Smith was dinner guest 
last Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. 
Norman, of Gunpowder. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Tanner and 
Mrs. Evelyn England were d, iner 
guests on Christmas Day of (4rs. 
Ed Bentbam and daughter . 1 an- 
ces, of Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Snyder^en- 
tertained with a turkey dinnei on 
Christmas Day in compliment of 
their children and grandchildren. 

Friends of Mr. Oliver of Price 
Pike will be glad to know he has 
returned to his home and is do- 
ing nicely following an operation 
at St. "Elizabeth Hospital. 

John 'Schram and family have 
purchased the residence of his 
father, Fred Schram. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Marshall left 
Sunday for Cynthiana, where^ he 
is sales manager in the Harrison 
Tobacco Warehouse. They have 
been enjoying the holiday segson 
at their lovely home on Lloyd Ave., 
and greeting his friends and neigh- 
bors here. ■'" 

Tommy Utz who is attending 
college at Richmond, enjoyed the 
holiday season with his moFier, 
Mrs. Jane Utz and sister, ^ary 
Jane. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Herman (nee 
Mary Markesbery) of Defiance, O., 
have returned to their htfme 
after enjoying a few days' visit 
with her mother, Mrs. Eliza Mark- 
esbery and family. ■ 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Lee Eddins is quite ill at her res- 
idence. * 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Piatt spent 
the past week in the East on busi- I j 
ness. y £ 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Baxter and j [ 
daughters and Pvt. John M. Conn- 1 1 
ley and family spent Saturday j 5 
with Emmett Baxter and family, of ; |£ 
Harrison, Ohio. 

Pvt. John M. Connley of Ft. 
Custer, Mich., arrived here Satur- 



day for a few days' furlough be- 
fore leaving for Louisiana. 

Mrs. Floyd Sininger spent the 
week-end at Germantowh; wftrf Her 
mothfif,- q -ri lttl£ S) ^. 

Mr. ah^MM/ DW-Garnett vis- 
ited Mr. and Mrs. Robert Herman 
and mother, Mrs. Eliza Markesbery 
on Saturday evenings . .. 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Anna Conner is on the sick list. ' 

Mrs. Emma Griggs and Mrs. 
Crandle Acree spent Monday in 
Covington, shopping. 



aO 



UNION 



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to 



Mrs. J. Lassing Huey and Miss 
Jo Ann Huey are home from a 
week's visit with relatives in 
Miamisburg, Ohio. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Holtzworth 
and Nancy Lynne Wilson , spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. -John 
Wilson. f.,' ' ., gj 

Miss Marie Coffy, of jNasiH^P, 
Tenn., was house guest last week 
of Mrs. Leslie R. Barlow. 

Miss Mary Hedges spent the hol- 
iday vacation with friends in Bur- 
lington. 

. .Mrs. Elva M. Norman is conval- 
escing from an attack of pneu- 
monia at the home of her grand- 
daughter, Mrs. Benny Setters and 
Mr. Setters. 

Pvt. Russell Doane is here from 
California for a two week's fur- 
lough with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. Doane. 

Mr. and MrS. Harry G. Dunn 
stopped over Saturday, enroute to 
Bergin, Ky., for the day with Mrs. 
Maggie C. Wilson. ; , r ■' 1 

Capt. Walter Ferguson returned 
Wednesday to Quantico^^rjafter 
a two weeks' furlough ^Mqjthj h& 
family. 

Mrs. Sallie K. Hicks had 'as ^uesti 
during the holidays, Pvt. Peter 
Hutchinson, of Florida. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Heizer 
were in Cincinnati Christmas Day 



to enjoy a family dinner party at M| 
.the home of her mother, Mrs. Lu-~" 
cille Slater. 

1 Mrs. Kittie Utz Taylor, of Rich- 
wood Road, spent Friday with the 
Leslie Barlows. 

1 Mrs. Etna McNeely, of Belleview 
is with her sister, Mrs. Pearl 
Blankenbeker, who is quite ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Bloss en- 
tertained with a delightful dinner 
Christmas Day the ^following 
guests: Mr. Warner Senour, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sammy Trouberman, Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Holzworth and Miss 
Nancy Lynne Wilson. 

Mrs. Mary Simmons continues 
quite ill at the home bf her daugh- 
ter,. Mrs. Bess Liggett. 

After a three-day furlough with 
his family, Pvt. Malone Ligon left 
Monday night to the Marine base 
at San Diego, Calif. 
• Mr. and Mrs. James A. Huey had 
as house guests over the week- 
end. 'Mr. and Mrs. John Oliver 
Taylor and the. Misses Jean and 
Katherine Taylor, of Louisville, Ky. 



HO-HUMMM! 

What This Place 

Needs, Folks, Is 

A Few Good 

Ads In This 

NEWSPAPER 




^M3EHSHBHXHXHSHXHSHXHXHZH»IXHXHXNXHZHSHSH3HSHSHZHEHSH^ 

!• X 

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PUBLIC SALE! 

Having sold my farm, I will offer to the highest and best bidder 
bidder at public auction at the farm, located 1.4 miles from High- 
way No. 16, near Verona, Kentucky, on 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 8TH 

At 10 o'clock C. W. T. 

the following described livestock, farm implements and house- 
hold goods: About 35 tons of baled hay, alfalfa, red clover, tim- 
othy; nine Hereford Shorthorn calves, about 6 months old.; five 
springer heifers, good ones; one bull; five good cows; 48 good 
young ewes; four bucks and one lamb; team of 5-year-old grey 
mules; one 10-year-old mule, good leader; 100 shocks of fodder; 
two turning plows; one-horse jumper plow; two-horse jumper 
plow; two Rastus plows; two mowing machines; one hay rake; 
one disk harrow; one "A" harrow; one hillside plow; one wagon, 
box bed, and hay bed; three sows, bred; eleven shoats; some 
corn; lot of small farm tools; lot of household goods; other 
things too numerous to mention. 

• .}• 1 

TERMS— Cash on all items under $10; if desired, credit of 6 
months with bankable note, for items over $10. 

COME AND SPEND THE DAY— LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON 

THE GROUNDS 

D. R. CHAPMAN 



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AUCTIONEER: PORTER WELLS 



VERONA, KENTUCKY 



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!2HSH3HXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXIIXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXMXHXHXHZHXlS 



r 



wm*f PREVIEW 

SPRING 
CATALOG 







1 



Production and delivery difficulties make it im- 
possible to mail Sears new Spring Catalog to our 
customers' homes for several weeks. However, a 
few advanced "press" co» ies have arrived at our 
store. Come in now and Be the first to select from 
the new, fresh stocks — see the new Spring fashions 
in wearing apparel and for the home. Shop atw 
Sears One-Stop Shopping Service Catalog Sales 
Desk and see Sears new, Jfpring Catalog. 






SWCATAIOG 



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iaSeeltfiO^l 



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COVINGTON « 13 W. 7th St. - HE-2004 






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THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 




I 



FLORENCE HOMEMAKERS 

\ The Florence Homemakers held 
■their annual Christmas party at 

the home of Mrs. Gertie Fossett. 

Each one contributed toward the 
■ x dinner which consisted of roast 

chicken, dressing and gravy, cran- 
i berries, peas, sweet potatoes, slaw, 
! hot rolls, gingerbread with fruit 

(j. sauce and coffee. 
The business of the club took up 
lost of the morning and Mrs. 
illian Schram was chosen as del- 
gate to Farm and Home Week at 
Lexington late in January. A vol- 
untary offering was taken to send 
, some Christmas cheer to the in 
'■ mates of the County Infirmary at 
I ( he County Infirmary. 
\ ■'.)• After the lesson some games 
• were played and the gifts distri- 
buted. 

>► Those enjoying the party were 

mfiss Gillaspie, Misses Delia and 

Bessie Girard, Jane Scott, Mrs. Ann 

Conner, Mrs. Lillian Schram, Mrs. 

Adrienne Stith and Donnie, Mrs. 

Geneva Arnold, Mrs. Luella Hous- 

, jon, Mrs. Eileen Barnett, Mrs. 



s 




I . ■ I * l i » i l ■ i 



Your 
Eyes 



Eye-strain causes fatigue — 
lessens your efficiency. Take 
I good care of your eyes. Let 
us carefully examine them. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 



Verda Martin, Mrs. Frances Berk- 
shire and Joe Clinton, Mrs. Arch 
Marie Maddox and Donald, Mrs. 
Lorie Morith, Mrs. Lucille Cook, 
Mrs. Gertie Fossett and Mrs. Mabel 
Sayre. 

For the afternoon party, Mrs. 
Fossett had invited Mrs. Nelson 
and her two little girls, who are 
living in the same house with Mrs. 
Fossett, to join us. They are from 
Minnesota. The entire affair was 
most enjoyable and we closed 
with the song "Sing Your Way 
Home" each one voting Mrs. Fos- 
sett the perfect hostess. 

Mabel G. Sayre, Reporter. 



RABBIT HASH 



Quite a lot of snow and rain fell 
here the past week. 

Farmers here are preparing their 
tobacco for market. 

A number of folks are ill with 
flu. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Black 
Dec. 28th, a baby boy, named Don- 
ald. 

Sorry to hear that Mrs. Florence 
Harris does not improve very rap- 
idly. 

Jennings Craig of Camp Peary, 
Va., enjoyed a short furlough here 
Christmas. 

^ Mrs. Emma Craig and Mrs. Fran- 
ces Craig spentf Sunday with Mrs. 
Bob Williamson and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Jarrell took 
nnner Sunday wittx Mr. and Mrs 
Alton Buckler, of McVille. 



FOOT TEST 




N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



Forty-two bushels of balbo rye 
have been sown in Grant county 
for the production of balbo rye for 
seed. ' 



REPLACE YOUR OLD MEAT SAW 

WITH A NEW BLADE, WHILE YOU WAIT 

75c 

This offer is good for one week only from Jan- 
k uary 6, 'til January 14, 1944 

Wm. Hagedorn 

856 DIXIE HIGHWAY ' ERLANGER, KY. 



s I 



iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiim 

NO PRIORITIES 

I Are Needed For Farm Tools I 
i To Be Welded | 

( R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY I 

722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 
< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iT^ 



Usually the first sign of foot 
trouble is the running over of the 
heels of shoes. 

In a strong healthy human foot 
the 26 bones are held together 
to form a substantial support for 
the weight of the body and they 
are held together in place by 
strong ligaments, tendons, and 
muscles. These bones are so ar- 
ranged that they form four separ- 
ate and natural arches. - 

The heel bone „and ankle bone 
lean out of position more or less 
in almost every kind- of foot 
trouble. The cause, is that liga- 
ments, muscles and tendons which 
hold the heel bone and ankle 
bone in place, become weakened, 
and are not strong enough to 
hold these bones in their normal 
position. 

backaches, headaches and many 



body ills may be traced to feet. 
Even symptoms like those of 
rheumatism and arthritis now are 
being banished with proper shoes. 
Also nervous indigestion, sleepless 
nights, etc. — Adv. 



BEAVER LICK 



COOKED A FINE DINNER; 
THEN THREW IT TO DOG 

f One lady recently stated that she 
used to throw her own dinner to 
the dog most of the time. It made 
her sick just to look at anything to 
eat. She was swollen with gas, full 
of bloat, had headaches, felt worn 
out and was badly constipated. 
Finally she got ERB-HELP and 
says she now eats everything in 
sight and digests it perfectly. 
She is enjoying life once more and 
feels like "some other woman" 
since taking this New Compound. 
ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable 
people soon feel different all over. 
So soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP! Dahlenburg's Drug Store, 
Erlanger. 



s\ 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER FOR SALE TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER AT MY FARM LOCATED JUST OFF 
GOODRIDyGE DRIVE, FLORENCE, KY., (LOOK FOR THE 
SIGNS) ON 



1:00 P.M. (CWT) 



<- 



\ 



,M 



The following: One good team of work horses; % milch cows, 
one with calf by side and one to freshen in June; one gilt, weigh 
abut 250 lbs.; 50 Plymouth Rock pullets, ready jo lay, and 4 
young roosters ; 3 ton good mixed hay in stack; 1 good double 
set of harness; 2 spools of 3-point barb wire; Ideal mowing 
machine in good condition ;. hay rake; 2 turning plows; David 
Bradley 2-horse hillside plow; laying off plow; double shovel 
plow; 5-tooth cultivator, good as new; disc harrow, in good con- 
dition; 2-horse spring wagon; 2 sleds; 20-gallon lard kettle; 
chicken feeders ; crosscut saws, and a lot of items too numerous 
to mention. • 

Terms: CASH 



Clarence 

Owner 

DAVID TANNER, Auctioneer 



Mrs. Fannie Howard and Miss 
Jean Besterman have rented an 
apartment on Woodburn Ave., Cov- 
ington for the winter. 

Mrs. Mattie Griffith left last 
Saturday for Los Angeles, Calif., 
where she will visit her sister, Mrs. 
Mary Rose. 

William Wilson has been laid up 
with an abcessed ear. Bud Moore 
has been driving his truck during 
his illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Green en- 
joyed a telephone conversation 
with their son William Huey Green 
last Sunday. William is stationed 
at Shepherd Field, Texas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Atha and son 
moved last week from the Hill Top 
Service Station to the farm they, 
bought near Verbna. 
Cards from Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Mc- 
Cabe state they are nicely settled 
at Edinburg, Texas, for the winter. 

Mrs. Jim Sleet received word 
Tuesday that Mrs. Alice Densler 
had passed away at her home in 
Gallatin County. Funeral services 
were held at Paint Lick on Thurs- 
day. 

Hughes Johnson, of Memphis, 
Tenn., has been here, the past 
week with his father. W. C. John- 
son while Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd 
Johnson and son spent Christmas 
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Cotham, of ClaTksville, Tenn. 

A very enjoyable meeting of the 
New Haven Homemakers was held 
at the home of Mrs. George Baker, 
Dec. 21. The meeting was called 
to order by the president, Mrs. 
Harry Moore. After the business 
meeting we were invited to the 
dining room where we did ample 
justice to the delicious covered dish 
luncheon. After lunch we drove 
out to New Haven and thorough- 
ly enjoyed the program presented 
by the first six :grades. We then 
returned to Mrs. Baker's for our 
Christmas party and exchange of 
gifts, under the direction of our 
program chairman, Mrs. Walter 
Pennington, after which we work- 
ed on the afghan we are making 
for the wounded soldiers. After 
the meeting we were entertained 
by G. W. Baker. Jr., with two very 
pretty piano numbers. Our next 
meeting will be held on January 18. 



G 



AYET 

THEATRE " 



Y 



ERLANGER, ELSMERE, _KY 
FREE PARKING LOT , 
SHOW TIME % 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:00 and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:,' p. m. 

Sunday 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p. m. 



TONIGHT and FRIDAY 

JANUARY 6TH AND 7TH 




r 



DOWT 
LET 

POOR, 

BUSinESS 

GET YOU DOWIH 






ft 



are WONDERFUL 




SATURDAY 

JANUARY 8TH * 




SUNDAY and MONDAY 

JANUARY 9TH AND 10TH 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

Catherine Hehman. East Bend 
Road, Burlington R. 2. 

T. H. McCaffrey's Springlake 
Stud, Dixie Highway, Route 25. 

Geo. B. Pierce, Ludlow, Ky., R. 
2, Box 110. 

John O. Richards, Jr., U. S. 42. 

Nellie M. Markland Farm, North 
Bend Road, Francesville, Ky. 

Florian Holton Place, Peters- 
burg, Ky. 

J. W. Marsh farm, Woplper 
Creek, Burlington R. 2. 

R. C. Eastman, Florence, Ky. 

Jim Wainscott, Sand Run Creek, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1. 

M. G. Martin farm near Bullitts- 
ville. 

F. Sebastian Farm, Ashby Fork 
Road, Petersburg, Ky., R. D. 

Dr. George Sperti Farm, near 
Burlington. 

Dr. W. J. Tanner farm, Florence 
Ky. v 

Leslie Gardner farm, U. S. 42 at 
Gunpowder. 

J. W. Rogers, Petersburg, R.. D. 

R. S. Hood Estate, Constance, Ky. 

W. F. Hausman, Ridgeview Stock 
Farm, Amsterdam Road, Ludlow, 
Route 2. 

Michaels' Farm, Elijah Creek and 
Mary Ingles Highway. 

C. I. Sahlfeld Farm, Bullittsville 

Jergens & Herbstreit Farms, 
Ludlow, R. 2. 

W. M. Gross, Ludlow, R. 2. 

E. E. Stokes Farm, Burlington, Ky 

Edward Kippler Farm, Garrison 
Creek. 

W. H. Rucker Farm, Constance. 

Stephens Brothers Farm, Bur 
lington, Ky., R. 2. 

Elsbernd's Hill Top Farms, Con 
stance. i • 

R. T. Heizer farm, Joe Wood, 
Manager, U. S. 42 near Beaver Lick. 

Will J. Stephens, Rabbit Hash, Ky 

Ryle Brothers, Rabbit Hash, Ky. 

J. C. Hauer farm, next to Bul- 
littsburg Baptist Church, Idlewild. 

Ray Carnahan, East Bend Road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

Ernest W. Allen farm, Burlington 
and Belelview Pike. 

NOTE— Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1944. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 





liT^rdAINLEY 

Patricio Sam TtwiWoa" 

DANE-LEVENE-HUL 

Una Haiel 

H0RNE • SCOT© 

Jimmy 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Shorts 





ALSO 




NEAR 
-My UttU i^»fs 

■ \ .i*""^ 

News and Shorts^ 



For your convenience this 
Theater sells WAR BKNDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 
box office. 

W 



GASBURG 



TUES, and WEDNES DAY 

JANUARY 11 AND 12TH 



TWO BIG FEATURI , 



John Aylor is suffering with a 
severe cold. 

H. W. Baker is suffering with 
a badly strained tendon in his leg. 

Mrs. Frank Biddle and son Paul 
Edward spent Saturday, with Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Cook. 

Seaman and Mrs. Porter Huey 
spent Thursday night and Friday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey. 

Clyde and Henry Slayback call- 
ed on the Wolfe family, Sunday. 

Buddie Smith, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley Smith has been quite 
ill the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
Miss Gladys were callers on Mr. 
and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and son, of 
Petersburg, Thursday evening. . 

Messrs. Charles White, Lloyd 
Siekman and W. O. Rector were 
business visitors in Burlington, last 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Angelin 
(Emma Frances Cook) of Balti- 
more, Md., surprised their family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Andy Cook, Satur- 
day, when they arrived for a brief 
visit. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charlie White were 
visitors in Covington, Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Jones and 
son Jimmy and Miss Jane Aylor, 
of Covington, spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. John Aylor. 

Mrs. D. C. Pope and daughter, of 
Covington, spent Sunday afternoon 
with Mr. and Mrs. Andy Cook. 

Charlie White and Lewis Slay- 
back are the first in this neighbor- 
hood to sell their tobacco at Cov- 
ington. They received very sat- 
isfactory prices. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham an4 
son called on relatives in Belief 
view, Sunday. 

W. O. Rector called on Andy 
Cook, Sunday. 

Mrs. Cord Cox and son were 
callers in our burg one afternoon 
last week. 

Happy New Year! 

Mr. and Mrs. Costa Polly, of 
Westford, Mass, spent the holi- 
days with Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Bak> 
er. 

Miss Jane Aylor, of Covington, 
spent the week-end with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John Aylor. 

Howard Huey and Mrs. John 
Klopp have been on the sick list 
the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Slayback 
and children were recent guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Noble and 
family, of Covington. 

Wallace Aylor was a business 
visitor in Burlington one day last 
week. 

Miss Mary Frances Bondurant 
was Sunday guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. F. Burns and son. 

Buddy, Billy and Johnny Smith 
sons of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith 
have been quite ill with colds. 

Mr. and Mrs. Costa Polly were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Bernie 
Mullenkamp of Aurora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Pope 
called on Mr. and Mrs. John 
Klopp one day last week. 

Sherman Burcham spent Satur- 
day and Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen Burcham. 

Cleve Aylor and Miss Emmaj 
Aylor have been on the sick list. 1 

Miss Mary Rector called on Mrs.' 



Edward Lyons of Petersburg, on 
Thursday afternoon. 

Lester Ramey spent Thursday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Brady 
and family. 

Glad to report that A. H. Cook 
is able to be out. 

Mrs. W. O. Rector and daugh- 
ter spent Saturday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Baker and Mr. 
and Mrs. Costa Polly. 



STEPHENSON MILL 
ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Amos Pennington 
and daughter spent Christmas 
With Mr. and Mrs. Levi Penning- 
ton and family. 

Mrs. Rella Richardson spent 
Christmas with her niece, Mrs. 
"Buster" Day, Mr. Day and fam- 
ily. 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Penning- 
ton and daughter spent Christ- 
mas Day with Mr. and Mrs. A. C. 
Marsh and family, of Verona. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Penning- 
ton and sons spent Christmas with 
Mr and Mrs. Nick Trapp and Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewis Trapp. of Green 
Rbad. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington 
had as Sunday dinner guests: Mr. 
and \ Mrs. H. G. Helms and son, of 
Cincinnati, Mr. and Mrs. Curtiss 
Pennington and daughters and Mr. 
and \ Mrs. Amos Pennington and 
daughter, of Dayton, O., Mr. and 
Mrs.) Raymond Pennington and 
sons; of Alexandria, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Marsh and sons, of Verona 
Road, Leon, Lucy and Jimmie 
Pennington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Marsh and 
sons are visiting relatives in Day- 
ton and Cincinnati, Ohio, this 
week. 

i 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 

: . 



27 E. 7th St. , 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 

Features Shoppers' 
Lunch 

A special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 25 c 
should be of special interest 
to Boone Coupty shop pers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE 



NEW CROP 

DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 






SOLD ONLY AT HILL'S 









High in germination and purity . . . 
best all-around results assured. We 
advise you to buy them at your 
earliest convenience . . . begin now 
to make 1944 the biggest year you 
ever had . . . it's up to you! 



Same high quality since 1863 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiii 



CEORCE W. 



Since 186.1 

ILL 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 
I SINCE 1863 



mm 



I 



1 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1944 



DEVON \ Mr - and Mrs - John Geisen and sons, 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter and 

jCathryn A. Holzworth spent the sons > M* 8 - Maggie Glacken and 

week with Mrs. Rose Lunken-f Carey Carpenter spent Christmas 

Day with Mr. and Mrs. Eli Carp- 
enter. 



Mrs. Walter Noel and son Paul 
Robert, of Gallatin County and 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood spent 
Christmas Day with Mr. and Mrs. 
West Scott and family. Paul Rob- 
ert remained for a week's visit with 



his sisters. 

Sid Scott spent the past week 
with his uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Hub 
Scott, of Indiana. 

Mrs. Fred Turner underwent an 
operation on Tuesday and is slowly 



improving. This neighborhood 
wishes for her a very speedy re- 
covery. 

This neighborhood was saddened 
to hear of the death of Fobert S. 
Snow, of Latonia on Monaay. Mr. 



and Mrs. Snow were former resi- 
dents of this place. 

Quite a lot of snow fell here on 
Tuesday, causing slick roads, as 
well as several accidents. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Carpenter, 





HUM 



I [The year began with these im- 

I ortant events: 
i 
inuary 

1 — Russians capture Velikye 

Luki, great railway center. 

6— 78th Congress convenes. 

23 — British troops enter Tripoli, 
capital of Libya. 

25— Advancing Russians take 
Voronezh, Nazi anchor. 

26 — "Unconditional Surrender" 
agreement of Casablanca 
conference announced. 




tiuary 
, Russians recapture Velikye Luki. rail- 
i'-iroad center. 

'f-U. S. Department of War information 
announces 61.126 service casualties to 
date. 
12— IT. S. planes based in Africa bomb 

Naples, Italy. 
11 r British only 40 miles from Tripoli. 
23 British enter Tripoli, Libyan capital 

25 Voronezh, big Nazi stronghold, falls to 
Russians. 

26 "Unconditional Surrender" agreement of 
* Casablanca announced. , 



F^iruary 



ast German troops surrender in Stal- 
ngrad; U. S. Naval forces repel major 
Japanese attacks in Solomons area. 
'Lied headquarters establish separate 
S. command for North Africa. 
9— Last Japs withdraw from Guadalcanal. 
14 — Rostov and Voroshilovgrad captured by 
• Russians. 

15- Russians take Kharkov, important base. 

16- -ruiser Chicago is sunk by Japs; U, S. 
Javy reports 15 Jap ships hit 

26- r. S. flyers raid Kiska in Aleutians. 

hev retaken by Russians, 
lied bombers destroy Jap convoy of 
ships. 
Uritish attack Mareth line in Tunisia. 
American forces take Gafsa in Tunisia. 
*nese check Jap drive in Hupeh-Hunan 
_gion. 
24— Advancing Russians retake Abinsk and 

other towns near Smolensk. 
26 — U. S. and British troops advance in ' 

Tunisia. 
31— iritish take Matoula and two other 
■ (ties in Tunisia. 



destroyed, at a cost of 60 Flying Fort- 
resses; Japanese, continuing thrusts 
from Burma, invade Yunnan province, 
China. 

23— Melitopol, key city of German defense 
in south Ukraine, falls to Russians. 

29 — Russian troops recapture Dneprope- 
trovsk, important industrial city. 

29 — U. S. and New Zealand troops land on 
Treasury Islands, in Northern Solomons. 

30 — Russians reach entrance to . Crimean 
peninsula, trapping thousands of Nazis. 

November 

1 — Russian troops isolate Crimean penin- 
sula, cutting off escape for many thou- 
sand of German soldiers. 
2 — U. S. Marines invade Bougainville is- 
land in northern Solomons. 
4 — RAF planes drop more than 2,000 tons 
of bombs on Dusseldorf, Germany. 
6 — Kiev, capital of the Ukraine, retaken by 

Russians. 
T — British Eighth army advances in Italy, 
taking eight towns. 

11 — Nazis scuttle ships, blast installations to 
block harbors of Leghorn and Pescara. 

13 — Russians capture Zhitomir, important 
rati center of southern front; Chinese 
forces report gains along Yangtze river. 

19 — Greatest raid in history blasts Berlin, 
dropping 2,500 tons. 

23 — Another huge air attack smashes Berlin. 
One-fourth of city said to be razed. 
Makin island, member of Gilbert group, 
is taken by U. S. combined forces. 

26— Russians rip 37-mile-wide gap in Nazi 
lines north of Gomel. 

27 — Marines take Tarawa, one of Gilbert is- 
lands, after "toughest righting" in their 
history. 

30— British Eighth army bursts through Nazi 
lines in Italy, approaching Rome. 

December 

1 — RAF and U. S. bombers continue mass- 
ive raids, hitting Dusseldorf region. 
President Roosevelt meets with Churchill 
and Chiang Kai-shek in Cairo, Egypt. 
Agree to "strip Japan of her stolen em- 
pire." 
6— Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin meet at 
Teheran, Iran, reach "complete agree- 
ment on measures to crush Germany"- 
U. S. naval task force raids Marshall 
Islands. 
7— Chinese admit loss of Changteh, impor- 
tant city in "rice bowL" 
9— Turkey promises Allies all "aid short of 
war"; Chinese recapture Changteh. 

13— Russian troops regain initiative in Kiev 
area: British Eighth army cracks Nazi 
line in Italy, capturing 6,000. 

14 — President Roosevelt, returning from 
conferences, visits Malta and Sicily. 

15 — American planes raid Greece; U. S. 
heavy bombers smash Jap base on New 
Britain Island. 

16— Prime Minister Churchill stricken by 
pneumonia; German bombers sink 17 
UAted Nations merchant ships. 

17— Afirican Sixth army lands at Arawe, 
on'New Britain island, southwest Pacific. 




THE YEAR'S TEN 

BIGGEST EVENTS 

SELECTED By: BAUKHAGE 

(WNU Wtshiniton Corrtspondtat.) 

I— MILITARY : 

(a) Russian summer-fall offen- 
sive. 

(b) Pacific offensive (Attn, New 
Guinea, Solomons, Gil- 
berts). 

(e) Italy surrenders. 
(d) Air offensive against Ger- 
man cities. 

H— DIPLOMATIC: 

(a) The four-power conferences 

j (Moscow-Cairo-Teheran). 

(b) Formation of the TJNRRA. 

m—DOMESTIC: 

(a) Passage of the Connally 
Resolution. 

(b) Administration moves to 
right (OPA, Food Adminis- 
tration, War Mobilization, 
Stabilization, Economic 
Warfare). 

(c) Republican political gains. 

(d) Congress revolts against an- 
ti-inflation program (sub- 
sidies, reduced tax bill, res- 
olution favoring railroad 
wage increase). 



Simmons 7; Kazar Stadium — East All- 
Stars 13, West All-Stars 12. 
17— Ted Williams, formerly of Boston Red 
Sox, named "player of the year."' 



February 



January 




•rtresses: raid Cagliari, Sardinia; 
ese drive Japs back into Burma. 

lese retake Chuchiachuan. 

es bomb Naples, Kiel, Antwerp, 
est. 
'jtish capture Sfax, important Tunisian 

Jemen and other north German cities 

imbed in "biggest raid." 
20 — Russians attack on Kuban front, 
21 — Japanese executo U. S. fliers. 
23 — U. S. Naval forces occupy Funafuti 
i 'ands, southwest Pacific. 






Ma, 

7— \ terte falls to Americans; British first 

s V |ny takes Tunis. 
14—1 st resistance ends in North Africa. 
17 — xvczis attack in Kuban, Russian front. 
19— It S. bombers raid Pantelleria, Italian 

island fortress. 
23 — Guerrilla warfare spreads in Balkans: 
30— bi admit loss of Attu. 
31— wench Alexandria fleet joins Allies. 



Jun^ 



in 



9— Curtin says invasion danger past 
Australia. 
11 — Pantelleria, Italian island fortress, sur- 

r aders. 
12— r mpedusa, fortified Italian island, em- 
ulates. 

inese recapture Sungtze, port city. 
inese charge Japs use gas. 
IF bombs Cologne. 

S. forces land on Rendova, in 
domons. 




Sndova tak 
ssians lai 
nt; U. S. 



taken by U. S. forces. 
launch offensive on 160 mile 
Navy battles Japs off Solo- 
mons. 
12 — British capture Syracuse. 
23 — V, S. troops enter Palermo. 
24 — i mericans take Marsala, Trapanl. 
25—1 USSOLTNI RESIGNS, KING EMMAN- 

\ SL ASSUMES GOVERNMENT. 
26 — 1 IF raids Hamburg, Hanover, Essen. 
27—1 Han peace negotiations begin. 

Jscist party dissolved. Riots sweep 

,/iy- 



1 — Vtf S. planes bomb Ploesti refineries. 
sssians take Orel; British capture Cat- 
ta, in Sicily. 

tericans occupy Munda, in Solomons. 
11 — Russians drive into Ukraine. 
17 — Allies enter Messina; Island of Vela 

Livella in Solomons taken. 
18— F ;sistance ends on Sicily. 
21 — \ S. and Canadian troops occupy Kiska. 
24 — C iebec conference on war plans ends. 
25 — I itish Admiral Mountbatten made chief 

o Allied Southeast Asia command. 
30—1 ssians retake Taganrog, Nazi anchor. 



1— President Roosevelt calls for unity 
an*jng Allies, stresses "the supreme ne- 
cessity of planning what is to come 
after the war." 

4— U, S. Supreme court frees Thomas 

Pendergast, Democratic political leader 

./Of Kansas City, under statute of limita- 

y tions ruling. 
"'6— 78th Congress convenes; Samuel Ray- 
burn speaker of house for third term; 
Pleasure driving banned in eastern 
states; Fuel oil ration reduced 25 per 
cent. 

11 — U. S. and Britain relinquish extraterri- 
torial rights in China. 

12 — OPA sets corn ceilings at approximately 
SI a bushel. 

28 — Joint draft system, by which men can be 
inducted into navy, marines and coast 
guard as well as army, announced. 

February 

8— National Income in 1942 was, $113,824,- 
000,000 as compared with $94,500,000,000 
in 1941. 
9 — Roosevelt orders 48-hour work week 
minimum in labor shortage areas. 

12 — President Roosevelt promises stepped- 
up attacks on Europe and Japan. 

18— Mme. Chiang Kai-Shek addresses Con- 
gress asking for more vigorous prose- 
cution of the war on Japan. 

20— Dried foods rationed, effective March 1. 

23 — Secretary of Agriculture Wickard sus- 
pends wheat quotas. 

March 

2— U. S. and Chile representatives sign 

lend-lease agreement. 
7 — Draft classification "4H" for men be- 
tween 38 and 45 ended. 

11 — Lend-lease extension to July, 1944, signed 
by Presidjent. 

24 — Establishment of naval base at Casa- 
blanca announced by navy. 

25 — Chester Davis named Food Adminis- 
trator. 

29— A "critical shortage of doctors is devel- 
oping," an OWI survey reveals. 

April 

8 — President moves to check inflation by 
executive order freezing wages and for- 
bidding war workers to change jobs. 

10— Feed corn ceiling prices raised from 
$1.02 a bushel to $1.07. 

11— A bill permitting the national debt limit 
to rise to 210 billion dollars, and a rider 
repealing the $25,000 net salary limit be- 
comes law without President's signature. 

20 — President Roosevelt confers on war and 
postwar problems with President Ca- 
macho of Mexico. 

30— Soft coal miners of United Mine Workers 
union reject President Roosevelt's order; 
U. S. breaks relations with Martinique. 



Hon: Chester Bowles Is named general 
manager of the Office of Price Admin- 
istration. 

19— World's largest pipeline, the "Big Inch," 
running from Longview, Texas, to 
Phoenixville, Pa., is opened. 

21— John Lewis, as president of United Mine 
Workers, signs two-year contract with 
Illinois Coal Operators Association; War 
Department reveals 65,058 prisoners of 
war in country. 

28— Navy asks for more WAVES, stating 
that enrollment must reach 91,000 by 
end of 1944; Coffee rationing ended by 
OPA; Blue Network of Radio Corpora- 
tion of America sold for $8,000,000. 

August 

2— Race riot sweeps New York, resulting in 
death of five Negroes, and injuries to 
500; Drafting of pre-Pearl Harbor 
fathers set to begin on October 1; TJ. S. 
Army flyer in England dives Thunder- 
bolt and Lightning fighters at 780 miles 
per hour. 
6— June personal incomes totaled $12,162,- 

000,000, a new record. 
7 — Airplane production reaches record 
7,373 units. 

13— Gasoline ration in Midwest and South- 
west reduced from four to three gallons 
per coupon. 

14— The War Manpower Commission estab- 
lishes new list of 149 critical occupations 
for first priority in draft deferments. 

19— The army must be raised to 8,200,000 
men by January 1, 1944, and the navy 
to 2,861,000, the War Manpower Board 
announces. 

23— The Guffey Coal Act, passed in 1937, to 
stabilize coal prices, expires. No move 
made to renew it. 



30— William Cox, New York sportsman, pur- 
chases Philadelphia Phillies for about 
$230,000 from National League. 

21 — The Big Ten athletic council ended the 
rule forbidding freshmen to play on 
varsity teams. 

24 — Bucky Harris signs to manage Phila- 
delphia ball club. 

March 

13— Greg Rice runs fastest 2 miles at K. of C. 

meet, in 8:52.7. 
17— Philadelphia team wins the Golden 

Gloves championship in New York. 
18 — Detroit wins national hockey league 

Utle. 
20— Cornelius Warmerdam sets new pole 

vault record of 15 feet, 8>,i inches. 
25— Pauline Betz wins national indoor tennis 

singles championship. 

April 

6 — Cleveland Rams, professional football 
club, suspends playing for duration. 

•—Detroit Red Wings defeat the Boston 
Bruins, 2-0 to capture the Stanley Cup. 



May 



wins Kentucky 



Derby, 



1— Count Fleet 

in 2:04. 

8 — Count Fleet wins Preakness, in 1:57.2. 
21 — Bob Montgomery outpoints Beau Jack 

to gain lightweight title. 

June 

8— Count Fleet wins Belmont Stakes. 

20— Gunder Hagg outruns Greg Rice to win 
5,000 meter race. 

26*-Francisco Segura wins Nat'l Collegiate 
tennis title, defeating Tom Brown Jr. 

28— Whirlaway, 5 year old race horse, re- 
tired. 

July 

2— Patty Berg defeats Dorothy Kirby for 
Women's Western Open Golf Champion- 
ship. 



16— Two are killed, 11 injured I riot grow- 
ing out of lynching in Beaumont, Tex. 
Martial law declared. 

21 — Race rioting in Detroit is suppressed by 
Federal troops after 24 hours of dis- 
orders. Twenty-six Negroer and three 
white men are killed, anoV more than 
700 are injured. 



July 



» B s ^L SnJf^ssr 8:53 - 9 m , «-*-«*■■» s-ss-* 



can record for 2 miles. 
13 — American League team wins annual 

All-Star game, 5 to 3. 
26— Harold McSpaden defeats Buck Whitney 

by 1 stroke to win All-American golf 

UUe; Patty Berg takes women's title. 
27 — Fred Fitzsimmons quits Brooklyn to 

become manager of Phillies. 



August 






September 

2— The exchange ship Gripsholm sails with 
1.310 Japanese, to be_ exchanged for 
1,250 Americans at Goa, Portuguese 
India; Churchill and Roosevelt confer in 
Washington. __ 

4 — William Jeffers, director of the nation's 

rubber program, resigns. 
7— Republican Postwar Advisory Council 

meets at Mackinac Island, Mich. 
8— Drive for 15 billion dollar third war loan 

opened by presidential address. 
14 — Col. William Coleman is convicted by a 
military court for drunkenness and care- 
• less use of firearms, demoted to cap- 
taincy. 
17 — President Roosevelt reports to Congress 

on Quebec conference. > 
23 — Shoe ration stamp becoming valid Nov- 
ember 1 must last six months. 
25— Edward Stettinius Jr. moves from lend- 
lease administrator to succeed Sumner 
Wells as undersecretary of state. 
29 — Senators report on war tour*. 

Octob 



H 



! I 



May 



September 



air 



from New 



1 — Jjtps withdraw 

OKiinea. • 
2 — Aied forces invade mainland of Italy 

ifgsr Reggio Calabria. 
7 — *SHes capture Palmi, Delianova. 
»— ITlLY SURRENDERS UNCONDITION- 
ALLY; Stalino, steel center, falls to Rus- 
sians. 
•—British troops take Taranto; Greatest 

A tied raids strike northern France. 
10— G rmans seize Rome. 
11 — A ies take Salerno. Italian fleet sur- 
r, ders. 

amaua falls to U. S. and Australian 
pes. 

yorossiisk recaptured by Russians. 
1 troops evacuate Corsica, 
defense at Finschhafen stiffens. 
°sb take Foggia. 



1— Allied forces take Naples, 22 days after 

landing at Salerno. 
3 — A stralian troops capture Jap base at 

F ischhafen, New Guinea. 
5— 1» md of Corsica, in Mediterranean, is 

fc sd of Nazis. 
9—t, ssians complete mopping up of Cau- 

c jus region. 

-I Jy formally declares war on Germany, 

reaction of Premier Marshal Badoglio. 

14— Iifc'great raid on Schweinfurt, Germany, 

^-ortant ball-bearing factories are 




1— Federal government takes over closed 
coal mines. 

11— Churchill arrives in Washington for war 
conference. 

13— Merger between Western Union and 
Postal Telegraph is announced. 

26— NLRB approves eight cent an hour 
raise i <r more than a million non-oper- 
ating ailway workers. 

27 — Machii ists' union, with 565,000 members, 
withdraws from the AFL. 

June 

3— United Nations food conference ends. 
7— Coal miners of the United Mine Workers 

union return to work. 
10 — President signs "pay-as-you-go" income 

tax bill. 
21— Riots in Detroit between white and 

colored mobs are suppressed by Federal 

troops, after more than 24 hours of 

disorder. Twenty-nine killed, 700 injured; 

Coal miners strike for third time since 

May 1. 
23 — President Roosevelt threatens to draft 

strikers in essential industries. 
28— Judge Marvin Jones succeeds Chester 

Davis as War Food Administrator. 
29 — FederaV court ->f appeals in Chicago 

grants new trials to six persons convicted 

of aiding Herbert Haupt, executed spy. 

30 — Five s< hators appointed to visit war 

' zones a id report on U. S. Army and 

Allies; Stocks on New York exchange 

reach a three-year high. 



July 



1— House rejects amendment to Labor-Fed- 
eral Security bill, thereby cutting off 
funds for National Youth Administration; 
President Roosevelt gives last minute 
reprieve to Max Stephen, sentenced to 
death for aiding escape of a Nazi flyer. 

7 — Gen. Henri Giraud, French commander 
of Northwest Africa, arrives in Wash- 
ington. 
15— The BMrd of Economic Warfare is 
abolish* 1, and its functions transferred 
to the ^construction Finance Corpora- 



4— Treasury asks for ten and a half billion 

in new tax revenue. 
7— Merger of Western Union and Postal 

Telegraph companies is completed. 
11— Censorship of weather news is lifted. 
12— National Labor board rules that labor 

unions have a moral responsibility not 

to strike in wartime. 
13— American Federation of Labor votes to 

take United Mine Workers back into fold. 
18 — Third war loan passes goal of 15 billion 

dollars by nearly four billions. 
20 — The 48-hour week for war industries is 

extended to 30 more localities. 
22— Zinc-steel pennies are to be discontinued, 

Treasury announces. 
28— Wildcat coal strikes referred to Presi- 
dent by War Labor Board. 

November 

1— Federal government seizes 3,000 coal 
mines in which strikes are halting pro- 
duction. 

2 — Elections of various state and national 
officials reveal Republican trend. 

3 — United Mine Workers ordered to return 
to work as president John Lewis accepts 
new wage agreement, giving miners 
$56.74 for 48-hour week. 

5 — Senate votes postwar collaboration with 
other nations, 85 to 5. 

6— Fifteen non-operating railroad unions re- 
ject wage increase offered by emer- 
gency committee; Bernard Baruch is 
appointed chief of a new unit of the 
Office of War Mobilization. • 
18 — Army officials reduce budget by 13 Ml- 
lion dollars, which sum will revert to 
treasury. 

A subsidy of 100 million dollars is allo- 
cated to stabilize price of flour. 
23— House votes against extension of con- 
sumer subsidies. 

December 

1— Ration values of meats reduced 30 per 

cent. 
3— U. S. plane output for November an- 
nounced as 7,789. 
4— Army will retire 25,000 officers, reduc- 
ing total to 625,000. , 
7— Biggest U. S. battleship, the 45,000-ton 

Wisconsin, is launched. 
10— Non-operating rail workers get senate 

approval for eight cent per hour raise. 
11 — Senate imilitary committee plans gradu- 
ated discharge pay for servicemen, 
ranging from $200 to $500. 
16 — President Roosevelt returns to capital; 
senate committee votes to retain food 
subsidies for 60 days. 
17 — OPA promises lowering of meat ration 
points. 



S— Ryder Cup golf team, captained by 
Craig Wood, defeats Walter Hagen's 
team. 
•—Howard Schenken wins the contract 
bridge master's championship for fifth 
time. 
25— College All-Stars defeat the Washington 
- Redskins, professional football cham- 
pions, 27-7. 

September* 

1— The St Louis Cardinals and New York 
Yankees retain strong leads in National 
and American leagues. 
6— Lieut. Joseph Hunt takes the national 
amateur tennis championship. 

18— The St Louis Cardinals defeat the 
Chicago Cubs, 2-1, clinching the National 
league pennant; Collegiate football 
season opens. 

19— Detroit Lions beat the Chicago Card- 
inals in professional football opener. 

25— The New York Yankees take the Ameri- 
can League pennant for the 14th time. 

October 

2— Occupy wins Belmont Futurity. 

3— Final baseball standings; St. Louis 
Cardinals, won 105, lost 49, for a per- 
centage of .682. The New York Yankees, 
won 98, lost 56. for a percentage of .636. 

8 — Columbus, O., American Association 
team, defeats Syracusev,N. Y., Inter- 
national league team, to capture "little 
world series" title. 
10— Yankees win World Series, defeating 
Cardinals, four games to one. 

November 

2— Stanley Musial, St. Louis Cardinal out- 
fielder, named most valuable player in 
National League. 
9— Spurgeon Chandler, New York Yankees 
pitcher, chosen most valuable in Ameri- 
can League. 

14— U. of Southern California and the U. of 
Washington chosen for Rose Bowl. 

19 — Beau Jack regains lightweight title, out- 
pointing Bob Montgomery. 

27— Great Lakes defeats Notre Dame (19-14) 
in year's biggest football upset. 

December 

12— Chicago Bears win western pro football 
championship. 

IS— Ned Day regains title as All-Star Na- 
tional Bowling champion. 



22— Maj. Gen. William Upshur, Capt. Charles 
Paddock, both U. S. M. C. officers, and 
four other persons are killed in Navy 
plane crash near Sitka, Alaska. 

27 — Three soldiers who became 1 ;sr ta desert 
maneuvers near Yuma, Ajz-. die of 
thirst. W^ 

28 — Hurricane sweeping over Texas Gulf 
coast kills 13 persons. Damage esti- 
mated at 10 million dollars. 

29— Twenty persons were burn d to death 
when American Airlines pi ne crashes 
and burns near Trammel^ Ky. Two 
escape. 

August 

1— Ten persons, Including Mavor William 
Baker and Maj. William Rcpertson, die 
when Army glider crasher in demon- 
stration flight ta St. Louis. 

2— Five Negroes killed, more than 500 white 
and colored injured ta race rioting ta 
New York city's Harlem district 

5— Fourteen persons are drowned in a 
"flash" flood ta central West Virginia. 
28— Twenty-one miners are killed ta gas ex- 
plosion at Sayreton, Ala. 
30— Twenty-nine persons are kj Led and 150 
injured ta wreck of cracfr Delaware, 
Lackawanna and Western R. R. near 
Wayland. N. Y. 

September 

6— Eighty persons killed and 177 injured, 
when Congressional Limited of the 
Pennsylvania R. R. is derailed near 
Philadelphia. 

7— Twentieth Century Limited train of New 
York Central R. R. is de ailed near 
Canastota. N. Y., killing thr«; Houston, 
Tex., hotel fire takes lives of 50 men. 
17— Explosion of depth charges at the Naval 
Air Station, Norfolk, Va., takes 25 lives. 
About 250 are injured. 

\ 'hen Army 
transport plane crashes mar Maxton, 
N. C. • 

October 

16— Crash of airliner 47 miles west of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., takes 10 lives. 

23— Navy announces that 88 sejamen died 
when two tankers collided off Palm 
Beach. 

November 

23— Six children die in farm home fire near 
Chicago. 

December 

13r-Twenty marines killed, 29 injured In 
Hawaii when collision of navy planes 
releases bomb. 

16— Sixty-nine killed, 50 injured m collision 
of two fast trains near Buie, N. C. For- 
ty-eight of the dead were servicemen.* 



— HH 




of Erlanger called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Carpenter and family, Sat- 
urday. 

Mrs. Gladys Carpenter and sftn 
Irvin called on Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Carpenter and family, Saturday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
called on his nephew, William 
Feldhaus, Sunday afternoon, who 
underwent an operation at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital, Thursday morn- 
ing. We wish for him a speedy re- 
covery. 

Ralph Tanner called on his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Tanner and 
family, Saturday afternoon. 

Quite a lot of tobacco is being 
prepared for market in this neigh- 
borhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Finnell and 
daughters, of Morningview spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Bresser and family. 

Word has been received of the 
change of address of Pfc. Charles 
A. Wood, 35796445, 8th .Gunnery 
School Squadron, AAR, Laredo, 
Texas. 

POINT PLEASANT 





Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
daughter entertained 
evening for Mr. and 



Wernz ; and 

Wernz and 

Wednesday 

Mrs. John 



January 



dentist. Dr. 



George 




January 

6— Fire kills six and injures 100 ta Chicago 

bowling alley. | 

21— Thirty-five Americans die when a trans- 
port plane crashes in the jungle near 
Surinam, Dutch Guiana. 

26— Brig. Gen. Carlyle Wash and nine 
other army men die ta an army trans- 
port plane that came down near Floma- 
ton, Ala. 

31— Twenty-eight persons die in sanitarium 
fire in Seattle. 



5— Famed Negro scientist, 

Washington Carver, 78. 
6— President emeritus of Harvard U., Dr. 

Abbott L. Lowell, 86. 
10— "Message to Garcia" hero, CoL Andrew 

S. Rowan, 85. 
23— Alexander Woollcott, 56, "The Town 
Crier" of radio, author, critic, play- 
wright, actor. 

February 

7— Dr. Attilio H. Giannini, 68,_physician, 
banker, motion picture executive, civic 
leader. 
19— Lynn Overman, 55, comedian. 

March 

10— Poet and author Stephen Vin«*nt Benet, 

44, Pulitzer prize winner with "John 

Brown's Body." 
20— Former governor of Illinois, Frank O. 

Lowden, 82. 
28— James A. Farrell, 80. president of the 

United States Steel corp. 

April 

22— Luren D. Dickinson, 84, former gover- i 
nor of Michigan, foe of "high life." 

28— Maj. Gen. Robert Olds, 46, commander 
of the U. S. Second Army Air Force. 





Dolwick, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Dolwick and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Leroy McGlasson and sons, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Adam WernZ. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dolwick, Sr., 
had as their guests for the holi- 
days, \ their son Sgt. James Dol- 
wick and wife. 

Pvt. and Mrs. Robert Andress 
spent one day last week with Mrs. 
Andress' sister, Mrs. Harry Wernz. 
Pvt. Andress is stationed at Camp 
Claiborne, La. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Wernz en- 
tertained last Saturday evening 
for the following: Mr. and Mrs. 
John Wernz, Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
Thirs, Miss Thelma Wernz, of 
Crescent Springs, Mrs. Fred Gar- 
nett, Mrs. Emma Wernz, of Con- 
stance, Mr. and Mrs. Donel Baker 
and son, Mrs. John Pierce, of Lud- 
low, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wernz and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wernz and 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gross enter- 
tained New Year's Eve for Mr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Kenton and Mr. and Mrs 
Geo. Wernz. 

Mrs. Helen Dolwick and children 
are confined to their home with 
the flu. • 



VERONA 



1 



May 



* ! 



11— Mai. Gen. Stephen O. Fuqua. 68., chief 
of infantry ta U. S. Army, 1928-32. 

20— Adm. Henry A. Wiley, 76. Pacific fleet 
commander, 1927-29. 

26— Edsel B. Ford, 49. president? of Ford 

Motor Co. 
29— Sylvester Q. Cannon, 77. Mormon church 

leader and publisher. 






February 






11 — Eighteen lose lives when a Liberator 

bomber crashes in Newfoundland. 
18— Twenty-eight die when four engine 

bomber crashes aflame into a packing 

plant ta Seattle, Wash. 
22 — Yankee Clipper crashes and sinks in 

Tagus river, Lisbon, Portugal. 

March 

2— Nineteen bodies recovered ta coal mine 

disaster at Bear Creek, Mont. 
21 — Flood waters spread over a wide area 
ta Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama and 
Louisiana. About 2,500 persons removed 
by Red Cross. 



April 



13 — Omaha airport and village of Carter 

Lake, Iowa, flooded when Missouri river 

dikes break. 
19 — Seven Sea Scouts drowned, and three 

missing, when cabin cruiser founders off 

Long Island. 
24— Blazing munitions ship ta New York 

harbor towed out and sunk. , 



June 

4-T-Maj. Kermit Roosevelt, 53, son of the 
former President, on active duty in 
Alaska. I 

16— Dr. Albert Bushnell Hart, noted histor- 
ian and Harvard U. professor, at 88. 

23— Rear Adm. Neil E. Nichols, 63, former 
commandant of Boston Navy Yard. 

July 

14— Actress Beverly Sitgreaves, 76. 
27— Rev. Ernest Lynn Waldorf, 67, bishop 
of the Methodist church. Chicago area 
29— Opera star Marie Gay Zanatello. 64. 

August 

1— President of China, Lin Sen, 79, scholar 

and artist. 
7—^. Bascom Slemp, 72, former Republi- 
can National Committeeman, and sec- 
retary to Calvin Coolidge. 

15— Lieut Gen. William M. Wright 79 
commander of two divisions in World 
War I. 

21— Dr. William Lyon Phelps. 78, of Yale 
university. 




GUADALCANAL 



September 



May 




January 



1— New Year's Day football results: Ro. 
Bowl— Georgia 9, U. C. L. A. 0; Sug: 
Bowl — Tennessee 14. Tulsa 7; Orai> 
Bowl— Alabama 37, Boston College 2 
Cotton Bowl— Texas 14, Georgia Tech 
Sun Bowl— Second Air Force 13. Harr> 



4 — Explosion and fire in munitions plant at 
Elkton, Md., kills 13 and injures 60. 

15 — A tornado injures about 200 men, and 
destroys 41 buildings valued at $175,000 
at Fort Riley, Kan. 

21 — Spreading floods in Mississippi -valley 
take twelve lives, and leave 108,000 
homeless. 

23 — A Pennsylvania R. R. express train 
lumps the track near Delair, N. J., kill- 
ing 14 and injuring 89 persons. 

24 — Death toll ta flooded region of lower 
Mississippi valley reaches 17 and 160.0C9 
are estimated to be without shelter, 
i— Deaths from all causes over Memorial 
day week-end holiday total 154. 

-rte 

Navy reports 84 men killed when a 
m munition ship collides with tanker 

i.T Port Arthur, Tex.; Eighteen soldiers 
re killed when an army truck falls 
•r a 300 foot embankment near Nash- 
ila. Tenn. 



6 — Former ambassador to Poland, John C 

Cudahy, 55. 
9— Rear Adm. Walton Sexton, 66, former 
chairman of the Navy General Board 
21— British Chancellor of the Excheauer 
Sir Ktagsley Wood, 62. 

October -> 

6— Patrick Nash, 80, political leader of 
Democrats ta Cook County, Dl., which 
includes Chicago. 

11— Samuel H. Church, 85, president Car- 
negie Institute. 

20— Ben Bernie, 52, band leader. * 

November 

9— Dr. Jesse G. Bullowa, developer of pneu- 
monia serum, at 64. 
21— Rep. J. W. O. Her (R.— Penn.), 
22— Rep. H. B. Steagall (D.— Ala.). 

December • 

13— Marvin Mclntyre, 65, for 20 years secre- 
tary to President Roosevelt, at Wash- 
ington. \ > 

16— E. C. "Billy'; Hayes, 59, well-known 
track coach of Indiana U; the Rev. Dr. 
William A. Brown, 77, Presbyterian min- 
ister, one of founders of World Council 
of Churches. 
Released by Western Newspaper Union. 




Winter has indeed visited this 
community with snow and slippery 
roads. , 

The school gave a very good en- 
tertainment December 23. The 
teachers deserve much credit fop 
the showing the children made 

Bro. Spahr and Mrs. Spahr en 
tertained the Sunday School witi 
a Christmas party on Friday even- 
ing,, December 24th. The children 
enjoyed Old St. Nick's visit as well 
as the games and plays. 

Mrs. Alfred Kemper and young 
son returned from St; Elizabeth 
Hospital to the home of ' her moth- 
er, Mrs. Jennie Harris on Christ- 
mas Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rouse and 
children have moved in with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harris: 
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Wilson, of 
Lebanon, O., arrived Sunday, Dec. 
26 to care for her aunt, Mrs. J. N. 
Blackwell, of Verona, who is ser- 
iously ill. 

Mrs. Nell Hunt, who visited her 
son Albert at Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
Dec. 24-26 had the misfortune to 
fall through a trap door at the 
home of Mrs. Blanche Kannadyi 
Young' with whom she* was visit- 
ing. She is recuperating nicely at 
her home and reports Albert look- 
ing fine, having gained 13 lbs. 

Mr. and Mrs.^3 STFinnel enter-) 
tained the following to a turkey 
dinner on Sunday, January 2: Mr. 
and Mrs. W. B. McCormick, Mr. 
and Mrs Arch Noel and Mr. and 
Mrs. J. B Lamn 

Mrs W. B. McCormick is teach- 
ing for Mrs. Sam Hudson while her 
husband is home on furlough from 
Great Lakes. , 



FATHERS' DRAFT 




Tixe year drew to a close with 
these important events: 

December 

1 — Roosevelt, Churchill, Chiang 
Kai-shek pledge to strip Japan 
of imperialistic gains. 

Exchange ship Gripsholm ar- 
rives with 1,223 American re- 
patriates from Far East. 

2— Fathers' draft bill delays dur- 
ing absence of President. 

16 — President Roosevelt returns to 
America following five weeks' 
diplomatic trip. 

ll — Army announces successful 
landing on Japanese base in 
New Britain. 



LARGE FARM SOLD 

BY MUTUAL COMPANY 

The Mutual Realty Company, 
Williamstown, Forest S. Thompson, . 
proprietor, reports the sale of 195 
acres of highly improved farm, 
land located in the edge of Galla- 
tin and Grant counties to R. P.! 
(Pat) Coleman, Falmouth, Ky. This 
farm belonged 1p D. R. (Dud) 
Chapman, Zion Station, who lived 
on the farm. This is a fine to- 
bacco and stock farm, and most 
of it can be cultivated with a 
tractor. Mr. Coleman will place a 
tenant on his new farm, as hi$ 
immediate attention is required by 
the large Licking River bottom 
farm on which he lives. The price 
was approximately $14,000.00. 

The company also reports the 
sale of 152-acre farm located near 
Mason, to Mr. Arnold, who now re- 
sides near Crittenden on Dixie 
Highway in Kenton County. This ' 
farm is owned by Bill Fortner, 
who lives on the farm. Mr. Arnold 
will get possession before March 
1st and will move to his new lo- 
cation. The price was $5,200.00. 




WDSJ&N' 



OUR JOB 

PRINTING 

IS RIGHT IN 
THE GROOVE 




mm 



L- 



> ' 



i 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 






--•:, 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






BELLE VIEW 



I 



I 4 



M 



J, 




L 



V 



>< * 






i 



Quite a number throughout this 
community have been ill with-ihe 
flu . 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L McNeely and* 
children of Maderia, Ohio, spent 
the Christmas holidays with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. E. McNeely. Other 
Christmas Day guests were J. D. 
McNeely, Bernard McNeely, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lee McNeely and Rev. 
and Mrs. Rob McNeely. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Hensley and 
daughter Nell Jo, of Ft Thomas 
spent Christmas Day with Mr. and 
Mrs. R. S. Hensley. 

Mrs. Lute Aylor, of Florence was 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Clore during the holidays. . 

Bobby Fryer of Louisville, spent 
the past week with his aunt and 
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Bur- 
cham and daughter. 

Mrs. Alice Aylor has been visit- 
ing her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Aylor, of Cincinnati, O., 
through the holiday season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ashcraft re- 
ceived word the past week that 
their eldest daughter, Margaret 
and husband, Louis Shilton are the 



proud parents of a baby girl, 
which has been named Phyllis 
Ruth. MRjind Hxs. Shilton reside 
at QampbfcilsbufS, fey v ; 

Prof. Jas. R. Huey and son r ipf 
Bowling Green, spent a portion of 
last week with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. S. Huey. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B Rogers, Jr, 
and daughter spent Christmas Day 
with Mr and Mrs. W. B. Rogers, 
Sr., and family. 

Mrs. Margaret Feldhaus is visit- 
ing with Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Kite 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown 
and daughter. 

Master Michael Dean Voshelf, of 
Goshen, O, spent last week with 
his grandfather, Kenneth Berk- 
shire. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Deck and 
children spent last Wednesday 
evening with Mr. and Msr. Hubert 
West and daughter. 

Miss Carolyn Cropper, of Bur- 
lington spent the week-end with 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rogers and 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far 
away front — send your smil- 
ing Valentine Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. 

Service Photo Studio 

804 MADISON, COVINGTON 






Studio Hours: 11 a. m. to 
m. daily. Sundays 1 to 
5 p. m. 



*p. 



son. «* * 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Clore, Mr 
.and Mrs. Allen Rogers and daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Martha B. Feltman and 
daughter were entertained at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Wolfe and Mrs.. Mary Tandy at 
McVille. Others present were Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Clore and Mr. and 
Mrs. Jas. Alvin Clore, of Burling- 
ton. 

Mrs. Clara Sebree spent Sunday 
with Mrs. Bertha Rice. 

Corinne, Bobby, and Junior Wal- 
ton, spent the week-end with their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. 
Huey. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. McNeely were 
visiting with Mrs. Pearl Blanken- 
beker, of Union. 

Harold Flick entered the U. S. 
Marines this week. Best wishes 
Harold, as you enter the service. 

Mrs. Louisa Edrington, of Flor- 
ence, spent the Christmas holidays 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Lafe Miller 
and son. 

Miss Audrey Lou Dolph, of Mad- 
isonville, O., spent the past week 
/with her grandparents. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Dolph. 



■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

WITH OUR BOYS IN 
THE SERVICE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimmiiiiiiiiiijiiimimi 

Cpl. Robert S. Garnett, 35790831 

740th S. A. W. Co., Suffolk Co. Air 

Base, Long Island, N. Y., writes 

the above change of address, and 

states that he receives the . paper 

regularly and enjoys it very much. 

He was recently moved from Drew 

Field Fla., to the above address. 
* » • 

Pvt. Glenn W. Stevens writes: 
"I have been receiving The Re- 
corder for several months now. I 
appreciate getting it as it gives me 
all the home town news. I also 



32 



HOME-CANNED FOODS 

SHOULD BE BOILED 

A ' ■ j — ''J'- 

That home-canned peas, beans, 

asparagus, corn and all other non- 
acid vegetables and meats should 
be boiled vigorously for 15 minutes 
before being used, is the' advice of 
Mrs. Pearl J. Haak, food specialist 
at the Kentucky College of Agri- 
culture and Home Economics. 
"Canned food should never be 
eaten as it comes from the jar," 
said Mrs. Haak, "even though there 
is no sign of spoilage. 

Use the liquid in which the food 
was canned for boiling, suggests 
this food expert, adding a small 
amount of ' water if necessary. 
Gravies and soups will have more 
food value, and be made more 



Early History Of Boone Co. 



.tasty by the use of such liquids, 
like the service column as it - gives | Por salad ^ ^ vegetables and 
me many of the addresses I do not —„,*. ^T^i,* k ^nio* HU^«rt3. 



know. ... I am now serving on an 
Island in the South Pacific. I look 
forward to the day when I can 
come back to old Kentucky. . . .1 
wish to thank you for the paper 
and splendid service I have receiv- 
ed. ... I would like to hear from 
anyone who cares to drop me a 
letter." 

His address is Pvt. Glenn W. 
Stevens. ASMCR, H. & S, Bat. 3rd 
Bpl. Wynp. Bn., Div. Spl. Trps. 
3rd Mar. Div, care Fleet Post Office 
San Francisco, Calif 




OUR WANT ADS 



PACK A WALLOP 



SMITH'S GROCERY 

We Deliver — Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, .:. KENTUCKY 



FLOUR, Grocer's Pride ..,.<... .25 lb. bag $1.20 

CORN MEAL, White 10 lbs. 45c 

BEANS, Great Northern or Pinto lb. 10c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can, no points per can 12V&C 

PEAS, Glenn Valley, 15 points .per can 14c 

CORN, White Cream Style, 13 points per can 12c 

MACKEREL, tall can, 16 points per can 18c 

PEACHES, No. %y% can, 27 points per can 26c 

PEANUT BUTTER, Jumbo, pt. can 33c 

MIRACLE WHD7 SALAD DRESSING ., pt. can 27c 



1 



COFFEE, Chase & Sanborn lb 

ORANGES per doz. 

LEMONS .... per doz. 

GRAPEFRUIT .-.;> ... 2 for 

APPLES • per lb. 

BREAKFAST BACON, sliced ....... per lb. 

JOWL BACON per lb 

NU-MAJJ) MARGARINE per"lb. 



32c 
40c 
30c 
15c 
10c 
35c 
20c 
20c 



JANUARY 

WHITE SALE! 

BE WISE AND BUY YOUR 
WINTER NEEDS NOW! 



Sheets, pillow cases, blankets, yard goods, sheet- 
ing, muslins, flannels, cretonnes, tubing, ticking, 
toweling, etc. 



^ - a 



ODDS AND ENDS 
Men's, Women's and Children's Wear 



You get most for your Shoe Stamp when you buy 
"Star Brand," "Poll Parrot," and "Endicott John- 
son" shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 
prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. V 



MORRIS DEPT. 



"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 
ERLANGER, - :- KENTUCKY 



We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Ira Vernon Smith, 
F. 1/c, 90 N. C. Battalion Co. D., 
Plat. 4, San Francisco, Calif., care 
Fleet Post Office, stationed at Pearl 
Harbor: 

"For a long time I have been 
trying to find time to write you a 
few lines, but have just put it off 
as I have been a pretty busy Sea- 
bee since I have been at Pearl 
Harbor. I have had just about time 
to write home and that is all. 

"I like this place fine, but would 
much rather be back home with 
all my old friends and have this 
war over, and I know that every 
boy in the service wishes the same 
as I. 

I "I have found 'Fats' Tanner since 
I ! have been here, and we both 
r6ad the same Recorder and enjoy 
it very much. I read almost every 
line of it as seven people I didn't 
even know when I was home, seem 
ta be real good friends of mine 
over here. • 

Tribute to the Fighting Seabees 
"The Navy needed fighters and the 

Navy needed men 
So they organized the Seabees who 

could fight and work again; 
iTbey took welders, riggers, boiler- 
men, butchers, cooks and bakers 
too, 
They put them in the Navy and 
showed the proper thing to do. 
With a machine gun and a rifle 

the Seabees learned to shoot*. 
W^ used a big machete — a thous- 

I and other things to boot; 
They taught us how to march and 

I drill, 
They taught us how to dress, 
And we even learned to manage 
To get seconds at the mess. 
We learned just how to knock it off 

like any other gob, 
They taught us all these many 

1 things in 13 weeks or less, 
Anjd what they didn't teach us, 
At the rest we had to guess. 
When we finished out our training 
We| left for Island X 
Wei had all our Own equipment, 
It pure loaded down our decks. 
The Japs they held the island 
When at last we hove in sight. 
We) knew that they were ready, 
So we prepared to fight. 
We! landed under heavy fire, 
Thfere was plenty shot and shell, 
But we rushed up to the beach head 
And we gave them plenty of hell 
We soon had wiped the Nippees out 
Then we went to work 
Every Seabee did his dutt — 
Not one was seen to shirk. 
We built a mighty landing field, 
A barracks and a dock; 
About a thousand miles of road, 
We made from solid rock. 
We got things finally squared away, 
'Twas mighty pretty to be seen,, 
Then we went back to the beach 

head, 
Where we saw our first Marine. 
They followed in behind us, 
Though they said they got there 

first, 
We pad everything completely fix- 
ed, 
They could even quench their third. 
From the Halls of Montezuma 
TO the shores of Tripoli, 
It Used to be the Leathernecks, 
But now it's all Seabees. 
And when we reach the pearly gates 

and stand at Heavens scene, 
There will be a Seabee waiting 

there 
To greet the first Marine. 

"Tell all the folks who care to, 
to write to me and I will do my best 
to answer." 
Ed Note — Ira's address is at the 



meats should be chilled thoroughly 
after having been boiled the re- 
quired length of time. 

Tomatoes, being acid, need not 
be boiled. t 

Mold, fermentation or bubbling, 
disagreeable odor, dark unnatural 
color, white sediment or cloudy 
liquid in a jar of canned vege- 
tables or meats, is an indication 
that the food has spoiled, and 
therefore is* not fit for consump- 
tion of either man or beast. In 
such instances, boiling is not a 
sufficient precaution, said the food 
expert. 

Housewives are warned not to 
feed spoiled canned foods to chick- 
ens, pigs or other stock. Spoiled 
corn and peas, for instance, are al- 
ways fatal to chickens. All spoiled 
canned food should be buried or 
otherwise put safely out of the 
reach of animals. 

Canned foods keep best in a 
cool, dark, dry place. When stored 
at too high a temperature, seals 
of jars sometimes break. 



AMONG T 



HE 



COUNTY AGENTS 



In Letcher county, 1,400,000 
quarts of fruits and vegetables 
were canned 38,000 pounds dried 
and 15,500 gallons of vegetables 
put in brine. 

The Macoupin variety of soy- 
beans yielded an average of 25 to 
30 bushels per acre in Hopkins 
county; other varieties, 15 to 16 
bushels. 

Seed will be saved for local use 
in McCracken county by S. G. 
Lamond who sowed 30 acres each 
of certified balbo rye, winter oats 
and Thorne wheat. 

Approximately 100 sewing ma- 
chines in Fleming county have been 
put in runinng order in prepar- 
ation for more home sewing. 

Approximately 2,500 late lambs 
were sold in Montgomery county, 
each weighing - more than 90 
pounds. 

The sowing of cbver crops in 
Cumberland county was reduced 
considerably, due to the scarcity of 
seed. 

More than 2,000 bushels of seed 
wheat, oats, barley and rye have 
been listed for sale in Barren coun- 
ty. 

Approximately 2,000 acres of 
crop land in Fleming county have 
been seeded to vetch or crimson 
clover this falfl. 



By A. M. Yealey 

Having received several letters 
in reference to the manufacture of 
salt in 1756 by the Indians and in 
1812 by the whites in "Chapter of 
first things in Boone County." The 
questions asked were, "Why was 
this discontinued?" The writer 
will answer this question briefly 
by saying the cost of manufactur- 
ing salt was almost $4.00 per hun- 
dred weight at Big Bone Lick, 
which proved too high to be ex- 
ported. 

It took about 550 gallons of this 
water to produce one bushel of 
salt (80 lbs). The first mode of 
manufacture was to fill kettles with 
this water and hang them over an 
open fire, very often in their 
crude cabins. In this way it took 
about a month to make one bushel 
of salt, but later we find that 
trenches about four feet deep were 
dug and large copper kettles hold- 
ing 25 gallons of this water would 
be placed on this trench. As many 
as ten would be placed side by side 
and the interstices between them 
would be stopped by flat rocks and 
clay. In this way a furnace was 
constructed and a fire was main- 
tained in both ends, ^ day and 
night. This mode reduced the ex- 
pense about 50 percent or to about 
$2.00 per hundred weight but the 
cost of cutting and transporting 
the fuel and the weakness of the 
brine made it unprofitable. 

We have in our possession Eph- 
riam Tanner's shop book and find 
where he purchased salt in Cin- 
cinnati for $2.94 per barrel (280 
lbs.) Sept. 1815. Mr. Tanner at 
that time lived between Florence 
and Union. We can rydily see the 
salt only cost him aoout 1 cent 
a pound, yet at Big Bone the cost 
of manufacture was nearly 5 cents 
per pound. Other reasons why the 
manufacture was discarded at the 
Licks was the development of the 
salt springs at Mayslic"! and Blue- 
lick on the Licking rsver. Bullits 
Lick on Salt River near Louisville 
was well developed an^ the brine 
at this place was very strong and 
as high as 50 furnace^ were built. 
At one time 600 men were employ- 
ed and the price of salt came down 
where the cost of manitfacture was 
about 1*4 cents a pounc". No doubt 
if the wells at Big Bo^e Lick had 
been bored deeper a better grade 
of brine would have been obtained, 
but transportation of material for 
the development of the salt works 
here was difficult and? we often 
wonder how these old pioneers did 
the wonderful things which they 
accomplished having lothing to 
work with except a hoe, ax, mall 
and shovel. ^ 

(To Be Continued) 

WAR TO REDUCE 

PET WAISTLINES 



The dehydrator purchased by 
the Hart county Farm Bureau has 
been in constant use all fall, one 
homemaker having 45 pounds of 
dried apples and peaches. 



..iilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 
NO SHORTAGE 
NOT RATIONED 

Dairy Hog and Egg Mash 
Supplements. See us for 
prices on ton lots or more 

Aylor & Meyer Go. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ROMEO FLOUR AND 

RAINBOW FEEDS 



RISING SUN 
Phone 90 



AURORA 
Phone 17 



V 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



FOR SALE — One good Jersey coy, 
fresh; calf one week old. $60.00. 
C. M. Emral, Florence, Ky., R. 
1. lt-c 



FOR SALE — Two fresh Guernsey 
cows. G. K. Taylor, Union, Ky. 

lt-p 



Tel. Florence 743. 



FOR^ SALE— Alfalfa and timothy, 
mixed hay; also ear corn. M. J. 
Millson, 15 Pike St., Bromley, 
Ky. 29-2t-c. 



FOR SALE — Horses; work mares 
and weanling colts; straw; good 
iron wheel 'farm wagon; child's 
large all-chore wagon. John W. 
Conrad. 32 Edwards Ave.„ Wal- 
ton, Ky. Tel. Wal. 317. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Set of farm harness, 
without collars. Price $35. Harry 
Ackemyer, Petersburg, Ky^ lt-c 



FOR SALE— Dix feed grinder; 3- 
horse riding plow; Delco light 
plant, batteries. Phone. Inde- 
pendence 6501. 29-2-p 



WANTED— Manager and helper for 
Burlington school lunchroom. 
Apply Box 158 or call Burlington 
228. lt-c 



Sc 



WANTED TO BUY— Small farm, 
close in. Will pay cash. Must be 
worth the money asked. , C. M. 
Emral, Florence, Ky., R. 1. 29-3c 



BANT AM PULLETS AND HENS 
WANTED— No roosters. Please 
inform me by mail your price, 
and number you have to sell. C. 
W. . Myers, Box 301, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 29-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Having sold my farm, 
I have for sale one 5-year-old 
horse; one 3-year-old mare colt; 
1 aged mare; 2 Guernsey cows, 
one due to freshen, the other to 
freshen soon; 1 Guernsey heifer, 
8 months old; 2 milch goats; 3 
hogs and some chickens. Mrs. H. 
C. Hand, Burlington, Ky., Route 
18 between Burlington and Bel- 
leview. lt-pd. 



DAHtY COWS— 6 head heavy- 
producing Wisconsin and Illinois 
dairy cows; 18 head Illinois 
mares and horses; will sell 
cheap; week's trial given; easy 
payments. Hog feed, $1.65 per 
100 pounds. Rabbit ^ay. Open 
Sunday. GENERAL DISTRIBUT- 

"ORS, 30 E. Second St., Coving- 
ton, Ky. lt-ch. 

FOR SALE— 50 tons of straight 
timothy and timothy and clover 
mixed hay. Ralph Jones and 
Dave Gaines, Tel. Flor 8103-J or 
Heb. 221. 29-4t-pd 



LOST— Ration book No. 3 belong- 
ing to Stanley M. Graves, Hebron 
Ky. If found please notify the 
owner. • lt-c 






BIG 4-H RECORD 

Four hundred and eighty-six 
members of 18 4-H clubs in Crit- 
tenden county produced 396,810 
pounds of livestock and poultry, 
canned 17,497 quarts of fruits and 
vegetables, bought $3,659 in war 
bonds and stamps, and worked 3,- 
450 hours on their neighbors' 
farms. 



A 4HII 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimimiimciiiiiiii 

New James 



Theatre 






Beginning Sept. 25th One Show 

Each and Every Night at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

War Time 

BARGAIN NIGHTS MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



Lena Horn, Bill Robinson, Cab 
Calloway Orchestra, in 

STORMY WEATHER 

FRI. & SAT., JANUARY 7 AND 8 



head of thisVarticle. 






r 







0»OOT VOUR, 
OWM HORN! IN 

(Qua/ AD COLUMNS 



Tyrone Power, Anne Baxter, 
Dana Andrews, in 



it 



CRASH DIVE 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 9TH 



John Mack Brown, Fuzzy Knight 
— in — 

"LONE STAR TRAIL" ' 

. MONDAY, JANUARY 10TH 



Women fighting for a love the 
law would deny them 

"CITY WITHOUT MEN" 

with 

Linda Darnell, Glenda Farrell, 

Leslie Brooks 

TUES. & WED., JANUARY 11 & 12 



Allan Jones, Jane Frazee, Gloria 
Jean, in 

WHEN JOHNNY COMES 
MARCHING HOME 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13TH 
milllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



The war is reducing "the waist- 
lines of a lot of pamperej pets, says 
Dr. W. W. Dimock, head of the De- 
partment of Animal Pathology at 
the Kentucky Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. This is especially 
true in towns and cities,- where red 
points are too scarce to allow 
many tidbits for house dogs and 
cats. 

•On the farm, Fido s id Rover 
catch rabbits and get scraps from 
the family table. There are plenty 
of rats and mice for cats War has 
made little difference tat the life 
of farm dogs and cats. 

For town pets the redded diet is 
in some ways a good thing. It's 
bring down pet waistlir/s, taking 
off excess and unhealtrr' fat, and 
in general Is for better%health of 
dogs and cats. For one thing, town 
people are buying more q nnmercjal 
dog feeds, and these fee s contain 
a high percentage of w? er and a 
low percentage of anim j protein 
and fat, being mostly cei^al grains. 
It is difficult for a dog4o put on 
much fat eating them. 

Dr. Dimock thinks thafinost pet 
owners need not worrjfc because 
their dogs and cats are not getting 
as much meat as they ate before 
rationing. It is likely ^iey were 
eating too much to be in top 
health. A restricted die^ will do 
them good. 

When possible, dogs and cats 
should have some lean meat, Dr. 
Dimock says, occassionally a piece 
of liver and some fat. Fat especial- 
ly lard, is considered a good feed 
for dogs. It is thought ti prevent 
and correct some kinds* of skin 
irritation in dogs. Those portions 
of animals (viscera) not j>mmonly 
used for human food are f eally the 
best kind of food for dogs. 



FARMS FOR SALE — 223 acres of 
fine level tractor land, on State 
Higway ' and surrounded by two 
other good roads, and R. R. in 
Boone County in 5 miles Dixie 
Highway and surrounded by two 
and stores. Improvements con- 
sist of 9-room house, 4-room 
tenant house, large dairy barn, 
large tobacco barns and other 
necessary improvement; electric 
lights. Price $90 per acre. 

96 Acres on good road, 7 mi. Dixie 
Highway, near village in better 
part of Grant County. Good lo- 
cust and limestone soil. Fine 
new 8-room frame house that is 
modern in every respect, hard- 
wood floors; cost $10,000; two 
large barns and other outbuild- 
ings. Price $9,000. 
THE MUTUAL REALTY CO. 
Fahnouth, Ky. Williamstown 
Forest S. Thompson, Proprietor 
Falmouth Phone 2817 



FARM TENANT WANTED— On 70 
acres, 50-50 on everything; mid- 
dleaged man with family pre- 
ferred. Must have , team : and 
tools to raise two acres tobacco; 
rest of farm for corn, hay, hogs 
and cows. Must have experi- 
ence enough to manage. I'll 
make such a man an attractive 
offer, P. O. Box 128, Florence, 
Ky.' 28-tf. 



FOR SALE — 10 Whitefaced ^steers, 
will weigh 550 lbs. up, have been 
fed a lot of corn. Will sell all 
or any part. R. L. Bowman, 
Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. Tel. Hebron 
137. v 28-2t-c 



RADIO 

rates. 

St. 



REPAIRS at 
COlonial 1121. 



reasonable 

509 Scott 

tf 



LOST — Male fox hound, 2y 2 years 
old; red with white feet. Please 
notify Perry Carver, Petersburg, 
Ky. 27-tf. 



FOR SALE— Baled hay, alfalfa, 
timothy and clover mixed; also 
soybean and 5 ton of straw. 
Floyd Campbell, Lawrenceburg, 
Ind., R. 1. 29-3t-p 



WANTED TO RENT— Either cash 
or share, 50 acres or better. Can 
furnish my own team and tools. 
Harry V. Lorentz, Florence, Ky., 
R. 1. 29-4t-ch. 



FARMS — All kinds, sizes, prices 
and terms. Buy while our prices 
are low. Come, call or write — 
now. Ogle and Porter, Madison 
or Vevay, Ind. lt-p 



WANTED— Housekeeper; must be 
fond of children; reference re- 
quired; good salary to right per- 
son. Mary C. Grubbs, Walton, 
Ky. Tel. Walton 352. 29-2c 



FOR SALE— Thor electric washer; 
living room sofa and chair with 
springs; Jenny Lind bed. May 
be seen at Mrs. John S. Ryle's, 
at Rabbit Hash: 29-4t-p 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 



All persons having data, s again- 
st the estate of Mrs. ArtiefM. Ryle, 
deceased are requested to present 
same, properly proven acyrdlngto 
law, and all persons indebted to 
the said estate are requested to 
call and settle immediately with 
the undersigned. 

H. A. Rogers, 
28-2t-c Administrator. 



ADMINISTRATRIX' NCJTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the state of Mrs. Emm; Oreen, 
deceased are requested to present 
same properly proven acceding to 
law, and all persons indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle immediately ^ith the 
undersigned. - 

Irene Green, 
29-2t-c Administratrix 



TENANT— 130-acre farm in Pen- 
dleton County 6 miles north of 
Falmouth; all new buildings with 
electric; two acres of tobacco, 
milk dairy; must have good ref- 
erence; good proposition with 
right party. For further inform- 
tion write Mr. E. R. Powers, 2014 
McCoy Ave., Covington, Ken- 
tucky. 299-3t-c. 



HATCHERY NOTICE— We have our 
Hatchery in operation now, and 
will have our first Hatch on De- 
cember 28th. Will have CHICKS 
for SALE every week on Tuesday. 
Due to the heavy sale of chicks 
last season we were unable to 
supply all of our mony old cus- 
tomers as they were late in book- 
ing their order. Please book 
your order early this year re- 
gardless of the day or month you 
want them, and I assure you we 
will have them for you^ on ; the 
date set. Order your chicks for 
early broilers to day, and be* sure. 
Wetherill Bros. Hatchery, Car- 
rollton, Ky. Phone 122. 27-tf. 



SELLING — 183 acres of select land 
near Union in Boone County, in- 
cluding a $3,000 residence on this 
farm; 6-acre tobacco base, more 
next year if desired. Drivej to 
Union and look it over. This is 
the Frank Powers farm, and, is 
definitely a .rare bargain. Write 
G. R. Good, owner, Farms-Apart- 
ments, and Mutual Real Estate 
Exchange, 421 Main Street, Car- 
rollton, Ky. 27-3t-pd 



INSURANCE — That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all legal 
damage claims, plus up to $500.00 
each to you and occupants of 
your car for injuries and med- 
ical services. Save' cash. Phone 

Walter Gaines, Burl. 509; Joe 
Dringenburg, Flor. 860; Ryle 
Ewbank, Warsaw 2318. 26-4t-c 



LET HELM help Increase your 
poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years contest 
winners; official world's records; 
government approved; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. ojuly31 



WANTED TO BUY— Gasoline wash- 
ing machine. R. L. Wilson, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 751. lt-pd 



FOR SALE — Nine-piece mahogany 
Duncan Phyfe dining room set, 
like new. Phone Burl. 79. lt-p 



FOR SALE — One horse, coming 5 
years old, broke; 1 Dodge coupe, 
perfect condition. Mrs. Mabel 
Morris Garnett, Price Pike, Flor- 
ence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 444. lt-ch 



FOR SALE— 1933 Plymouth coupe, 
motor in fair condition; good 
tires; hot water heater; owner 
in military service. See Elijah 
Stephens, Burlington, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE-7-Two O. I. C. sows, 
bred; one registered O. I. C. boar; 
10 O. I. C. shoats. Joseph Ran- 
dall, Petersburg, Ky! 28-2C 



FOR SALE — 245-acre farm, oner 
9-room house and one 3-room 
house; 2 barns; electric. J. IB. 
Snyder, 2% miles N. of Bullitts- 
Ville, Ky. Tel. Heb. 264. 28-2-p 



WANTED — Woman to work in 

^kitchen and assist with cooking. 

'Swan Restaurant. Tel. Dixie 

7555. 22-tf. 

■ . i . I L| 

TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf. 



AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT 
—BUY NOW 

Special- This Week Only 

LIVING ROOM SUITES 
$» Up 




Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison, Gov. HE. 9273 
MORE FOB TOUR HOUR 1 



Vi 



* 



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V 



1* 



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u 



I 



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;-; 




CTORY 
BUY 

UNITED 

•TATES 

.WAR 

>NDS 




Boone 



TEARING *n ' 
PAPERS OR ■ ■ 






■n 




ESTABLISHED 1875 




***!»* 



— 



VOLUME 68 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January 13, 1944 



NUMBER 30 



BURLEY AVERAGES 
$45 CWT. IN STATE 



ACCORDING TO REPORT OF 
STATE DEPARTMENT OF AG- 
RICULTURE — GROWERS RE- 
CEIVE $5,187,922.62 FOR CROPS 



Kentucky burley sales up to 
Tuesday of this week totaled 11,- 
528,115 pounds, for an average of 
$45.00 a hundredweight, a decrease 
of 63 cents from last week's aver- 
age, the State Department of Agri- 
culture reported. 

Growers received $5,187,922.62 for 
their crops., 

Highest average of the day, 
$47.43 was recorded at the Coving- 
ton market where 354,750 pounds 
of leaf were auctioned. The Car- 
rollton market reported sale of 
784,964 pounds for an average of 
$46.90, which Cynthiana reported 
sale of 490,054 pounds for an aver- 
age of $43.58. Lexington had an 
average of $46.47 for the day. 

Fairly heavy sales prevailed 
throughout most of the markets, 
the War Food Administration re- 
ported. 

The average reached at the Ken- 
ton Loose-Leaf Tobacco Warehouse 
Monday of $47.43 was believed to 
be the al-time high since the ware- 
house began operations. The high 
basket for the day brought 030 and 
low $13. 



TEN PLANNING 
MEETINGS SET 



BY BOONE COUNTY FARMERS 
DURING NEXT TWO WEEKS- 
WILL BE BOTH HELPFUL AND 
INTERESTING. 



Former Boone County 
Girl Is Bride Of Vevay Boy 



Miss Isabelle Brady, of Mark- 
land, Ind., became the bride of 
Emerson O^ Williamson Ph. M. 3/c 
U. S. Navy, in an impressive double 
ring ceremony performed Christ- 
mas morning at the home of the 
officiating minister, Rev. L. 8, 
Courtney, of Vevay. 

The bride is* the attractive and 
popular daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Brady, of Markland r Ind-., and 
-i$ a graduate of Patriot High 
School. For the past months she 
has been employed at the Jeffer- 
son proving ground at Madison, 
Ind. 

The groom is the only son of 
Mrs. Naomi Williamson and the 
late Marion Williamson of Vevay, 
Ind., and is well known through- 
out the county for participation 
in the field of sports. He is a 
graduate of Vevay High School and 
was employed at the Charleston 
Powder Plant prior to his enlist- 
ment in the Navy more than four- 
teen months ago. He is stationed 
at present at Great Lakes, HI., to 
which station he returned on 
Monday. 

Mrs. Williamson will continue at 
her , present employment. 

The bride is the granddaughter 
of Hubert Brady of Burlington and 
of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Step- 
hens, also oj Burlington. 

Their many friends join in ex- 
tending hearty congratulations and 
best wishes for a happy and pros- 
perous life together. 



T->rac-o stalks properly handled 
are valuable fertilizer, according to 
H. R. Forkner, County Agent. Re- 
cent work at the Experiment Sta- 
tion indicates that if the fertilizer 
in a ton of stalks was purchased 
it would cost approximately $15.00. 

This valuable fertilizer when 
properly used will return three or 
four times this amount in increas- 
ed crop yields. The unfortunate 
part is that the fertilizer in the 
stalks is highly soluble in water 
and if left out in the weather and 
not applied to the growing crop 
most of the value is quickly lost. 

One good local farmer the past 
week pointed out the practical dif- 
ficulty in finding a suitable place 
to spread the stalks this time of 
the year. It was suggested put- 
ting them in a temporary loft in 
the tobacco barn, chopping them 
up in spare time and spreading on 
new grass and clover seedings so 
that there will be no difficulty in 
raking the hay crop.* Each farm- 
er will, have his own individual 
problem on how to best handle the 
stalks. The important thing to 
remember is that in war times to- 
bacco stalks are too valuable to 
leave out in the weather. 



Hunters Urged To Turn 
In Report Of Game 
Kill For Season Of 1943 



Frankfort, Ky— Kentucky hunt- 
ers were today urged by S. A. 
Wakefield, Director of the Divi- 
sion of Game and Fish, to fill out 
the form on the back of their 
hunting and fishing licenses and 
mail them in to the Division of- 
fices here immediately, stating the 
amount and kind of game killed 
during the year 1943. The 1943 
licenses expired on December 31 
and new licenses for 1944 are now 
in the hands of the county court 
clerks of the state. 

Wakefield pointed out that such 
information would be of great 
value to the Division in compiling 
data on the amount of game kill- 
ed in Kentucky each year by the 
sportsmen -and the types or species 
taken in. the hunter's and fisher- 
man's bag. This informative data 
would then be used as a guide for 
future restocking of game in wood 
and field and fish in streams. 
, . 

Farm Account Meeting 

Scheduled January 18th 

The Boone County farm account 
or farm Tecord keeping training 
meetings will be held at Burling- 
ton on Tuesday, January 18th at 
the County Agent's office. AH in- 
terested fanners are invitett to at- 
tend. 



l> 






HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Rev. H. M» Hauter, Pastor 
Sunday, Jan. 10, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 



Four-H Club Tobacco 

Crops Averages 56.7 

Harold Congleton, Burlington 
4-H Club boy sold 320 pounds of 
tobacco for an average of $56.70 
per hundred weight. Yield from 
one-eighth of an acre of land was 
320 pounds. The land was very 
fertile and all the leaves .were 
saved by priming and picking up 
ground leaves. 



Hebron Man Sells 
Tobacco Crop For 
Average Of $54 CWT. 

M. F. Judy, of near Hebron sold 
approximately a third of his to- 
bacco crop on the Kenton Tobacco 
Warehouse floor, January 3rd for 
an average of $54.00 per hundre- 
weight. Mr. Judy had 3368 pounds 
to sell on the above date. 

His high basket was $57.00 and 
low basket $46.00. | . Boon - e 0oB S? farme " w U ? old 

Mr Judv stated that the tobacco' ten community agricultural plan- 

soW j£Sry 3rd wtaa general f rS I nmg m « etin * s durir * the nex * *° 
«? hiS^th*™!Ei£ nf ^*Ek weeks, according to H. R. Forkner. 
of hi* crop, the remainder of which ' . . Farmers at thp< ,. 

should bring Just as high a figure.', 11 ?/ 7 *?£„ ^ «. i ^ 

'meetings will outline the local 

agricultural improvement work 

they consider important during 

1944. Trie community improvement 

programs will be coordinated thru 

a county committee composed of 

the chairmen of the community 

groups. 

The schedule of the meetings 
follow: 

Hebroh, School building, Tues- 
day, Jan. ll t 8:00 p. m. 

Verona, Bank, Saturday, Jan. 15 
1:15 p. hi. - 

Hamilton, School building, Sat- 
urday, Jan. 15, 7:30 p. m. 

^Grant; School building. Monday, 
Jan. 17, 7:30 p. m. 

Constance, School building, on 
Thursday, Jan. 20th, 8:00 p. m. 

Walton, basement room bank, 
Friday, Jan. 21st, 7:30 p. m. 

Petersburg, school building, Mon- 
day, Jan 24th, 7:30 p. m. 

Burlington, County Agent's of- 
fice,, Tuesday, Jan. 25th, 7:30 p. m. 

Florence, Town Hall, Saturday, 
Jan. 29th, 8:00 p. m. 

New Haven, School Building, 
Monday, Jan. 31st, 7:30 p. m. 

These meetings held each year 
are both helpful and interesting. 
Leading ' farmers attending the 
meetings give their past years' ex- 
periences in agricultural im- 
provement and a recommended 
program is planned for the new 
year. Y~ 

All farmers interested in the 
agricultural improvement work |n 
their communities and the coun 
are invited to attend. 



SPORTSMEN URGED 
TO BUY '44 LICENSE 



SERIOUS REDUCTION IN REV- 
ENUE FACED BY DIVISION OF 
GAME AND FISH, SATS S. A. 
WAKEFIELD, DIRECTOR. 



Tobacco Stalks 

Worth $15 Per Ton 



MEN'S BIBLE CLASS TO MEET 

The Men's Bible Class of the 
Burlington Baptist Church will 
hold their monthly social and busi- 
ness meeting at the church next 
Saturday night, January 15 at 8 
p. m. All members are urged to 
attend. 



350 WORKERS ARE 
PLACED IN COUNTY 



SINCE JANUARY 1ST, ACCORD- 
ING TO W. M. SMITH, COUNTY 
FARM LABOR ASSISTANT— IN- 
CLUDES VARIETY OF JOBS. 



The Boone County farm labor 
program has assisted local farmers 
in securing 350 placements of farm 
workers since January 1st, 1943 ac- 
cording to W. M. Smith, County 
Farm Labor Assistant. 

The placements have included a 
wide variety of jobs varying from 
day workers, month > hands and 
tenants to the securing of custom 
machinery and job contract work. 
The farm labor program has been 
extended thru January and until 
further notice. Present indications 
are that many farmers may en- 
counter a more severe labor short- 
age in 1944 than during the past 
year. 

The securing and placement of 
farm tenants has been the most 
important farm labor job the past 
thirty days. A large number of 
.farmers have been assisted in this 
work. 

Farmers who have not secured 
tenants for 1944 are advised to do 
so at the earliest possible date. 
Tenants who must move should 
complete their arrangements as 
soon as possible. The fewer the 
tenant moves the better for the 
war effort. Tenant moves are ex- 
pensive and usually both the land- 
lord and tenant experience consid- 
erable expense when moves are 
made. Often after the moves are 
made both parties see where the 
move could have been avoided. 

Farmers who need tenants who 
must move are invited to contact 
the farm labor assistant at the 
County Agent's office. A list of 
available tenants and available 
farms are on file there. 



George M. Harrison 

Funeral services for George Mos- 
by Harrison, Big Bone farmer, were 
conducted from Big Bone Baptist 
Church, j Sunday, January 9th at 
2 p. m., with Rev. Roy Johnson, 
former pastor, in charge. Burial 
was in Big Bone; Cemetery, with 
Chambers & Grubbs, Walton fu- 
eral directors in charge. 

Mr. Harrison passed away at his 
home Friday from a heart ailment, 
after a long illness. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
May Harrison and one son Private 
Wm. E. Harrison of the U. S. Army. 



t 



Sarah Eliza McWethy 

Sarah Eliza McWethy passed 
away in her home, Petersburg, Sat- 
urday after a prolonged illness. Her 
remains were removed to the 
Chambers & Grubbs funeral home 
for preparation. 

Tuesday morning the body was 
returned ; to Petersburg Methodist 
Church where services were con- 
ducted at 2 p. m. with Rev. O. B. 
Thomas officiating. Burial was in 
Petersburg Cemetery. 

Miss McWetthy spent her entire 
life in Petersburg and leaves many 
friends to mourn her passing. She 
also leaves one sister, several nep- 
hews and nieces. 



Utopia Committee 

Plan 1944 Program 

The Boone County Utopia Club 
planning i committee will meet at 
the County Agent's office in Bur- 
lington on Wednesday evening, 
January 19th to plan the 1944 
Utopia program of work. 

Members of the planning com- 
mittees are Dorothy Souther, Al- 
berta Dickey, Rogers Knox, Mary 
Rector, William Moore, Lucian 
Bradford, Lou Pope and Grant 
Maddox. Members of the recrea- 
tion committee are Arch Marie 
Maddox and Jo Crigler. 
j j I jIwoiIo — , ' > ' 
'/iL 



Four-H Leaders To 

Hold Training Meeting 



!* 



Boone County 4-H Club leaders 
will hold a special training and 
planning meeting at Burlington on 
Saturday, January 22nd at 10 a. in., 
according to H. R. Forkner, County 
Agent. 

Plans for the 1944 activity pro-' 
gram will be made at the meet- 
ing. E. £. Fish and Edith Lacy, 
4-H Club specialists from the Col- 
lege of Agriculture will lead the 
discussions with the adult leaders 
attending. Each community club 
is urged to be represented. 



All hunters and fishermen were 
urged today by S. A. Wakefield, 
Director of the Division of Game 
and Fish, not to delay in purchas- 
ing their 1944 hunting and fish- 
igg licenses. 

In his statement for publication, 
Wakefield pointed out that the 
Division of Game and Fish faces- a 
"seripys reduction" in revenues 
because of the war, and that the 
only funds available for further- 
ance of the Division's restocking 
program come from hunters and 
fishermen. He explained that 
purchase of the 1944 licenses how 
with the resulant revenue, would 
be of great assistance to the Di- 
vision in its conservation program 
for the present year. 

Wakefield stated that December 
is the big revenue month for the 
Division and during that month 
of 1943 the Division receipts were 
far short of those for 1942 and pre- 
vious years. This decline result- 
ed from so many men going into 
the armed services; men and wo- 
men taking defense jobs with less 
time for sport and recreation; the 
rubber shortage and gasoline ra- 
tioning and shortage of ammuni- 
tion. The decline will continue as 
the war progresses and the only 
way revenue can be maintained is 
through the purchase of licenses 
by the people left back home. 
Even though a person might have 
Up opportunity to Jaunt or fish, he 
oK she can purchase a license and 
insure the continuance of the Con- 
ser ration program in Kentucky and 
know that the money spent for 
such a license will help to keep the 
oujl-of-doors intaot for the men 

en they return -from the pursu- 
ance of a victori«v» war. These 
men can then get oat their guns 
and fishing tackle to seek out the 
sports they once enjoyed in the 
past. 

. 

ENTERTAIN IN HONOR 

OF SOLDIER ON FURLOUGH 

Mrs. Ida Watts and daughter en- 
tertained with a dinner Sunday in 
honor of Sgt. James Watts, of 
Camp Maxey, Texas. Those present 
were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Goodridge, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Schwab, Mr. and 
Mrs. Thornton Watts and daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Snelling 
and sons, Mrs. Hallie Herbs treit 
and son, Helen and Marcella Brad- 
ford and Christine Fogle. 



INCOME TAX 
BLANKS MAILED 



ACCORDING TO S. R. GLENN, 
COLLECTOR OF INTERNAL 
REVENUE— RETURNS MUST BE 
FULED BY MARCH 15. 



S. R. Glenn, Collector of Intern- 
al Revenue, announced today that 
he has begun-to mail copies of the 
1943 Individual Income and Vic- 
tory Tax Return to the estimated 
500,000 Federal income tax payers 
In the district of Kentucky. 

Collector Glenn said, "Although 
these returns are not required by 
law to be filed until March 15, I 
cannot urge too strongly that 
everyone prepare and file his re- 
turn as early as possible." 

"There are," he said, "two maj- 
or points that are vital for every- 
one to understand. First, many 
persons will owe a substantial tax 
and should start immediately to 
find out how much they will owe 
and to make plans for meeting the 
obligation. I must emphasize this 
as a simple matter of fairness to 
these taxpayers who may have 
overlooked this phase of the 
change-over to the pay-as-you-go 
system. 

"Second, although many taxpay- 
ers will find that they are substa> - 
tially paid up on their 1943 taxes^- 
some of them, in fact, being en- 
titled to refunds — it is still neces- 
sary for them to file a return." „ 

Collector Glenn explained that, 
under the pay-as-you-go system, 
all current tax payments through 
withholding from wages or ty 
means of payments on "declare - 
tions of estimated tax" are onj/ 
approximate.. TEherefore^ Jtiiscneci 
essary to file a return at the clo^e 
of the year to determine the exa^t 
amount of each person's tax liabil- 
ity and to determine whether he 
underpaid or overpaid his taxes, ^i 
instances where the current pay- 
ments were less than the tax pay- 
able March 15, remittance of trt 



difference will be necessary at the 
time of filing the return. This 
amount cannot be paid hi install- 
ments. In instances where the 
current payments were larger 
than the final tax, the taxpayer 
will be enabled to secure a refund 
merely by filing his return. 

Early preparation of returns will 
be advisable, Collector Glenn said, 
to serve as a guide to the thous- 
ands of taxpayers who will have 
substantial payments to make and 
need to know how much the taxes 
will be so that they can make ad- 
vance preparations to pay these 
taxes. 

Substantial payments will be 
necessary in certain instances be- 
cause (a) -most individuals who had 
a 1942 tax must pay at least one- 
half of the forgiven portion of that 
tax in addition to their 1943 tax, 
and (b) during the first six months 
of 1943 only the victory tax, but 
not the income tax, was withheld 
from wages. 

Particularly, persons who took 
jobs for the first time In 1943 and 
those whose wages increased 
sharply from 1942 to 1943 may have 
substantial payments to make, Col- 
lector Glenn said. As an Illustra- 
tion, he pointed out that a single 
person who earned $2,000 wages in 
1943 but had no 1942 tax, will owe 
nearly $130 on March 15, or nearly 
three and one-half weeks' wages. 
Since this payments must be made 
in one sum at the time the 1943 
return is filed, the Collector point- 
ed out the advantages of deter- 
mining the liability and saving for 
it in advance. 

In the past, many taxpayers have 
postponed filing returns until the 
last minute in order to delay the 
payments which* had to be made 
with the returns. However, this 
year's great many taxpayers will 
find that, under the pay-as-you- 
go system, they are already sub- 
stantially current in their tax pay- 
ments. These taxpayers, especial- 
ly, ought to find it convenient to 
file as early as possible. 

In any case, early filing will help 
the taxpayer know where he 
stands how much he owes, or how 
much refund he should expect, it 
will assure him of any assistance 
he may need without standing In 
long lines; it will help the govern- 
ment and the war effort. 
Who Must File 

A return must be made by every 
individual who during the taxable 
year 1943 — 

Was single and had $500 or more 
income. 

Was married and had more than 
$624 income. 

Was married and, together with 
wife or husband, had $1,200 or 
more income. 

In addition, a return must be 
filed by everyone who paid or 
owed a tax on 1942 income. 

A return should be filed like- 
wise by anyone claiming a refund 
of taxes withheld from wages. 

The requirements for filing 
1943 returns on or before March 
15, apply to civilians and person- 
nel of the armed forces alike, ex- 
cept that postponements or exten- 
sions are allowed those who" are 
on sea duty or outside the conti- 
nental United States. If a mem- 
ber of the armed forces is on sea 
duty or outside of the continental 
United States, his wife may alsc 
postpone her return if her own in- 
come is less than $1,200. There are 
several other special provisions ap- 
plying to members of the arm^d 
forces, and Collector Glenn invited 
any service personnel needing tax 
advice to contact his office. 
Forms To Use 

As in the past years, there are 
two income tax forms. Form 1040, 
commonly called the "long form," 
may be used by any individual. 
Form 1040A, called the "short 
form," may be used by individuals 
who (a) are citizens or residents 
of the United States, (b) had in 
1943 $3,000 or less income, and (c) 
received all their income from 
salaries, wages, bonuses, commis- 
sions, or other forms of personal 
compensation, or from dividends, 
interest and annuities. In the 
case of husbands and wives filing 
separate returns, each must use 
the same form. 

Collector Glenn also stated that 
notices have been mailed or will 
be mailed In the near future to all 
taxpayers who filed returns in this 
district for 1942, showing the 
amount of each, individual's 1942 
tax and the amounts paid on that 
tax. These are two additional fig- 
ures which income taxpayers will 
need in the preparation of their 
returns for 1943. The notices should 
be sent back to the Collector along 
with the return. 



$500,000 Quota For 
Boone County In 4th 
War Bond Drive 



-♦ 



r \ 



CRESS FAMILY RECEIVE 

PRESENTS FROM SON 
[ -G-jq v STATIONED IN ITALY 

. 

S.-Sgt. Harry Cress stationed in 
Italy with the Uni1j$d States Army 
sent his mother a beautiful bed- 
spread made in Italy. He also sent 
his sister Katherine for her birth- 
day, ear rings, necklace and a pin. 



Local Homemakers Will 
Sponsor Waste Paper 
Drive In Burlington 

The Burlington Homemakers' 
Club will sponsor a waste paper 
drive in the Burlington commun- 
ity on Saturday, January 15th. All 
persons are asked to have paper 
tied in bundles and ready for mem- 
bers of the 4-H Club who will call 
for your paper. 

Contributors, if they desire, can 
take their paper directly to the old 
school building where it will be 
placed into proper channels to aid 
the critical paper shortage. 

Proceeds derived from the col- 
lection of this paper will go to 
the Burlington Homemakers' Club. 



CITIZENS ASKED TO SUBSCRIBE 
WITHOUT SOLICITATION— NA-, 
TIONAL QUOTA IS SET AT $14,- 
000,000,000. 

- 1 



Fish And Game Clutf/ 






Will Meet Tonight 



The Boone Comity Fish and 
Game Protective Association will 
meet tonight (Thursday) at the 
club house, 7:30 p. m. Refresh- 
ments will be served by the com- 
mittee. 

All members are urged to at- 
tend this meeting, and to renew 
their dues for the year 1944. 



Local Jersey Herd 
- Has Fine Record For '43 



The S. Whitehouse Dunlap Farm, 
received from The American Jersey 
Cattle Club their "Herd Improve- 
ment Re gistry " certificate for the 
year ending October Sl,~19t3v- The 
herd is on test and is re-entered 
for the third consecutive year. 

With all the adversities the 
farmers in 1943 had to, meet, this 
herd of fine registered Jerseys 
came through with a good per- 
formance. 

The certificate shows there were 
twenty-two cows in the herd which 
gave 132,281 pounds of milk, and 
6695 pounds fat. The herd averaged 
14.10 cows in milk. Each cow av- 
eraged 8242 pounds of milk, 5.06 
percent fat and 417 pounds of fat 
on twice a day milking. 

There were nine, cows that pro- 
duced over 400 pounds of fat dur- 
ing a 305-day lactation. 



TRAINING MEETING 
AT BURLINGTON 



BY HOMEMAKERS— FIVE CLUBS 
REPRESENTED AT MEETING— 
"CLOTHUVG ACCESSORD3S" IS 
MAJOR PROJECT IN JANUARY 






Homemakers attending the cloth- 
ing training class in Burlington 
were told that they could do' most 
of ttheir spring shopping at home 
in the clothes closet or wherever 
their unused clothing is kept. 
Clothing leaders studied "mend- 
ing and patching" and handmade 
clothing accessories. Only five 
clubs were able to send represent- 
atives due to the bad weather. 

The morning was devoted to a 
study o£ methods of mending and 
patching. Clothing leaders were 
pleased to learn how to reweave 
a patch on woven materials and in 
knitted garments. 

Clothing accessories such as 
hats, purses, gloves and collars 
were displayed at the afternoon 
meeting. Leaders discovered that 
many accessories may be hand- 
made from leftovers-.,at home. 

The lesson at the training class 
was given by Mary Hood Gillaspie, 
Home Demonstration Agent, assist- 
ed by leaders. 

All local clubs in the county will 
have mending and clothing acces- 
sories for their major project in 
January. 

Following are the clubs schedul- 
ing meeting for the remainder of. 
the month: 

Walton, Mrs. Carrie Rouse, Jan. 
13th. 

Rabbit Hash, Mrs. Vernon Step- 
hens, January 17. 

New Haven, January 18th. 

Bullittsville, Miss Mattle Krey- 
lich, January 20th. 
' Florence, Town Hall, Jan. 21, 

Taylorsport, Mrs. Easfe Good- 
ridge, January 21st. 



The Fourth War Loan Drive be- 
gins next Tuesday, January 18th; 
The quota for Boone County is 
$500,000.00 for individuals, which 
amount has been broken down into 
the twelve precincts as follows: 
Precinct Quota 

Beaver $ 19,277.09 

Belleview 19,707.88 

Bullittsville-Hebron ..... 44,471.23 



• •••■•••-. 







68,483.54 
17,914.52 
27,935.61 



Burlington 
Carlton . . 
Constance 

Florence ." J ... PI 12,670.65 

Hamilton .'. . . i . . . . 16,638.66 

Petersburg 27,468.68 

Union , . 40,568.54 

Verona 24,669.92. 

Walton , ; 80,193.68 

Total $500,000.00 

A. B. Renaker will continue as 
County Chairman with the follow- 
ing precinct chairmen who served 
in the past drives: Robert L. Green 
of Beaver; C. E. McNeely, Belle- 
view; John L. Conner, Bullittsville- 
Hebron; C. D. Benson, Burlington; 
W. H. Presser, Carlton; C. Liston 
Hempfling, Constance; C. F. Blank- 
enbeker, Florence; Thomas Huff, 
Hamilton; J. H. Huey, Petersburg; 
Miss Lillian Bristow, Union; G. C. 
Ransom, Verona; Charles W. 
Thompson, Walton. 

Citizens of the county are re- 
quested to contact their precinct 
chairman and offer their services 
in soliciting subscriptions. Go to 
your bank and volunteer your sub- 
scription and not wait for someone 
to call on you. This would maka — ■ 9 - 
the task of raising our quota so 
much easier. The chairman, pre- 
cinct chairmen and workers are 
donating their services without 
hope of reward except to hasten 
the day of Victory. Do your part* 
by subscribing liberally. 

In addition to the usual Series ' 
E, F and G bonds, the treasury of- 
fers a 2*4 percent bond dated 
February 1st, due 1970 but callable 
in 1965; a 7-8 percent Certificate 
of Indebtedness dated February 1, 
due in one year; and Treasury Sav- j 
ings Notes, Series C, due in 3 
years, to yield 1.07 percent if held 
to maturity, or may be used for 
tax purposes. 

Total amount to be raised in the 
nation is $14,000,000,000.00 

In past drives the County chair- 
man has been provided with gaso- 
line coupons to meet? the require- 
ments of workers when using an 
automobile. In this drive the OPA 
advises that each individual work- 
er will have to make application 
direct to the county OPA office for 
gasoline to be used in soliciting 
bond subscriptions. J 

Let's all do our best to raise our 
quota. 



4^ 



Rainfall For Year 1943 

Totals 37.10 Inches 

According to Herb R. Wunder of 
the Lawrenceburg Ferry Road, 
precipitation registered by his rain 
and snow gauge at his farm for 
the year 1943, totaled 37.10 inches. 
Precipitation by months follows: 

January •. ....153 

February . j 155 

March 730 

April h 2.48 



May 

June 

July ... .. 

j August . . 

September 

October . 



6.59 3 
5.00 
6.63 ' 

.68 
2.10 
1.97 



November '.. . 1. 45 

Decerflber j. -- 1.12 



Craddock-Scudder 



Miss Hene Craddock, youngest 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tom 
Craddock, of Hebron and Mr. Irvin 
'Scudder of Covington, were united 
in marriage at 8 o'clock Saturday, 
December l8MvV*43, by Rey. Edwin 
Helton. The ceremony was per- 
formed at the home of the offici- 
ating minister. 

The bride wore a powder blue 
dress with black accessories. 

Attendants were the groom's sis- £ 
ter, Miss Marie Scudder and But- 
ler Moore. 

The young couple are at home to 
their friends in the home of Miss 
Florence Marquis. Burlington pike. 



Miss Carolyn Cropper was ill sev- 
eral days tills week. 



^Jm 



i 









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■* I ,." I 



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V 



J 




THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORD? ft, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



BflflHE EflUNTY REEnMEH 



A. E. STEPHENS, POftor and Owner 
RAYMOND COM! *S, Asso. Editor 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY 



BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 
ADVERTISING DEFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per column Inch. 

NOTICES AND CARDS ox THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. 

CLASSIFIED ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
word one cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
ems; column depth, 21 inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate (1 * , .$150 Per Year 



ib 



MEMBER 

AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Yean 



.. 



MEMBER 

kektocky pres! 
'as sociation , 

mnim ixtntt ««•• 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING GOES 
TO WAR 

The war has made us realize foi 
the first time the importance to 
the nation of many activities that 
are merely taken for granted in 
time of peace. 

We forget how much we need the 
electric light company until some- 
thing causes the lights to go out in 
our homes. Then public utility ser- 
vice becomes the most important 
thing in the world. Similarly, com- 
mercial printing has been regard- 
ed as a matter of course until now, 
when the War Production Board is 
curtailing the amount of paper 
that way be used in commercial 
printing. We are suddenly made to 



r jalize, in consequenoe, that such 
printing plays a major role in so 
many of our activities. 

Our telephone directors are a 
product of commercial printing. 
Commercial printers turn out the 
tickets that we use when we go to 
tie theatre. Stores inform us of 
tie goods they have on sale, and 
send us their bills, on products of 
commercial printing. Retailers 
know of the goods they can buy, 
and where to buy them, only be- 
cause they have catalogs, direc- 
tories and direct mail literature 
sent them by, jobbers and manu- 
facturers. These are among the 
most important products of com- 
mercial printing/ 

Were it not for commercial print- 
ing, businesses all over the country 
would have to multiply their sales 
forces many-fold, to reach their 
customers and service them di- 
rectly. This would be impossible 
as a practical matter, under pres- 
ent conditions of manpower and 
transportation shortages. 

At the same time, commercial 
printers have organized to conserve 
the use of paper in commercial 
printing, wherever possible. All 
factors in the graphic arts indus- 
try have joined in applying a pro- 
gram which call for: 

1. Getting the "most" out of each 



L'liiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiininiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiimiiiimiimimmimiiiiiiit 

| PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK 8 TRUST CO. f 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 

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uiiii[iiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini' ,l,,, = 

F. W. Kassebaum & Son, Inc. 



Authorized Dealers >. 
"Rock of Ages" Barre Granite 

1 , MONUMENTS 

Aurora, Indiana E 

niiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii^ 






*E 



sheet of paper. 

2. Using' the lightest practical 
weights and more readily avail- 
able papers. 

3. Using smaller sizes or chang- 
ing formats. 

4. Reducing spoilage and waste 
and improving reclamation of waste 
paper. 

5. Eliminating waste in inven- 
tories and distribution. 

This conservation program, in 
which users of commercial printing 
must play a large part, will assure 
the nation the minimum amount 
of commercial printing required to 
carry on its essential activities, and 
yet reduce the tonnage of paper 
t will be used in process. 



that 



FLIRTING WITH ECONOMY 

All these reports about slashing 
taxes, and pressure for Government 
economy are really serious. The 
Congress is taking the. bit in its 
own teeth and seems determined to 
enforce a few economies in Federal 
spending. 

Treasurer Morgenthau's reasons 
for continuing his fight for $10,- 
500,000 tax bill seems to be based 
oh the theory that the national 
income has expanded that much 
and he wants to "take it away 
from 'em" before the new-rich 
spend it carelessly. 

Nevertheless, the Senate is likely 
to decide on about One-quarter of 
that amount and back up the 
House appropriation, already pass- 
ed. 






KEEP ON * ■■• • • • « 

WITH WAR BONDS * 



Go To Church 



BELLE VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. n. Goth, ♦astor 

Sunday School at 10' a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. Logers, Hgtot 

Morning worship at ) 1:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. » ening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. ^ 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. : f 

Everyone is cordially invited to 
attend these services. r 

EAST BEND METl. DDIST 

CHUDCH v 
Rev. S. B. Godby, Faster 
Services each first 'ind third 
Sunday evening at 7 y m.; also 
every fifth Sunday morning and 
evening. 

Everyone cordially tasted to at- 
tend. v 

FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Root. Carter, 'aster 

Bible School 10:00 a. n. 



Morning services 11 • , m. 



First 



and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome 






DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

C«L 

VALLEY 0887 

We pay 'phone charges 

Kentucky Dead Animal 
Disposal Co. 

LOCKLAND, -:- OHIO 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 

%f USE 
6*6 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




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MAYTAG WASHER I 

PARTS 

and Genuine MAYTAG OIL - = 

1 SERVICE and REPAIRING | 

WM, HAGEDORN 

Authorized Maytag Service | 

| 856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. 1 

nilllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllF 



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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 






Ambulance Service ^ 
| LUDLOW, KENTUCKY | 

| Phone COlonial 2580 1 

^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 r r 1 1 f r ^ 







All leading breeds U: a 
Approved. Blood-tested, started chx&s one, two and 
three weeks old. Prices right. Also Sexed chicks^ 
FREECATALOG.Write: KENTUCKY HATCHERY 
til WEST FOURTH STREET « LEXINGTON. KENTDCE X 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas. Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

you are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 
Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 
Church 12:0§ E W. T. 
Evening services 8 p. m. E. W. T. 

FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Harold Wainscott , Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8 p.m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even- 1 
ing 8 p.m. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an ' work with us. 

RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. J 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedinger, Sunt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



PETERSB URG CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 
Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 

11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 
Church school 10 a. m. Harry 

Jarbo, Supt. 
We invite you to worship with 

us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, Supt. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.) 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



»» »» ■■■» 



"55! 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p..m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30 CWT. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially Invited. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 

ev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



unday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
orning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:0 0a.m. (CWT) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT ) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 




S THE TEST OF TIME . . . 



After more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 
we can safely say that our organization has stood this stern- 
est and most exacting of all trials. 



Chambers & Grubbs 



BULU TTSBU BG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 

Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

ri. T. U. 7:15 p. m. for Juniors. 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship at 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 

FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 

S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Can- 
roll Washburn. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 

Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 

WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Alrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 
-Evening Worship 8:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at 
tend these services. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r' 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt- 

Morning Worship 12 a,, m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. n\. EWT. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 



tend these services. 






= FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



WALTON 352 35 



^lllllllllllllllillllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllH 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 
Orion Erbaugh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:90. 
You need your church. 



BULLITT SBUR G BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. O. B. 
Yates, Supt. 

Preaching first and third Sun- 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7130 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott. Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed Shinfcle, Supt 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. 

Evening Service at 7:3G (C.W.T.) 

Pr»v»r meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p.m. *E*2 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLJ) L. LTJNDQUIST. n. n. 

Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

». I 

Lesson for January 16 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council ox Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



JESUS ANSWERS HIS CRITICS 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 2:23-3:8. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Blessed are ye. when 
men shall revile you. and persecute you, 
and shall say an manner of evil against 
you falsely, for my sake.— Matthew 5:11. 



Criticism and opposition was the 
constant lot of our Lord as He gave 
Himself in His labor of love for man- 
kind. It follows His disciples to this 
day, for men seem to have not only 
ingratitude, but an evil spirit which 
rewards kindness with hard words 
and unjust accusation. 

The scribes and Pharisees -had al- 
ready found ground for their com- 
plaint, for He had eaten "with- pub- 
licans and sinners" (2:16). The fact 
that He went there to win Matthew 
and to heal the sinsick (2:17) made 
no difference. Then they wanted to 
know why His disciples did not ob- 
serve a fast (2:18) in the solemn 
way they should. How could they, 
when the Lord was in their midst? 
They were joyful ' 

In our lesson we find these hating, 
watching enemies of our Lord's 
showing their bitterness in two 
ways. 

I. Open Accusation (2:23-28). 
They got at Him this time through 

His beloved disciples. It was the 
indirect approach so often used 
by cowardly people who want to hurt 
someone, but who dare not face him 
squarely. They spread evil reports 
or unkind criticism about a loved 
one, and thus wound the one they 
hate. 

Their accusation was, however, in 
a sense a direct one. They claimed 
that He was the one whc had per- 
mitted His disciples to violate the 
Sabbath law by plucking and rub- 
bing the ears of corn to prepare 
them to be eaten. In other words, 
He had allowed them to do a secular 
thing on a sacred day and thus to 
violate the holiness of 'the Sabbath. 
What they did was not wrong, but 
they did it on the wrong day, said 
these critics. 

Jesus met the charge by reaffirm- 
ing the high viewpoint of God con- 
cerning man. We have lowered our 
conception of man's position, while 
at the same time exalting his unde- 
pendable judgment. 

Everything that concerns man is 
sacred in the sight of God. Hunger 
is natural, God made man that way. 
He gets hungry on the Sabbath day, 
so he must have food on that day. 
The Sabbath was made to serve him, 
and he must not be harmed or hin- 
dered by his servant. 

Now, someone will say: "That 
means I can do what I like on the 
Sabbath— or the Lord's Day." No, 
it does not. What you need is right. 
What you desire may not be. You 
are more than an animal, so you 
must have more than physical rest 
and recreation on Sunday. You are 
more than a mental being, t hence 
you need more than cultures-read- 
ing, music or friendship on that day. 
You are a spiritual being and must 
have fellowship with God. 

See how nicely it all balances up 
when we go God's way. Then noth- 
ing that concerns us is common or 
secular. It is all sacred. 

II. Silent Hatred (3:1-6). 

Open criticism is bad, but it be- 
comes worse when it is hidden in 
the heart of a watching man (v. 2), 
one who looks for his opportunity to 
strike. 

The scene is a most dramatic one. 
Jesus came into the synagogue on 
the Sabbath day as was His cus- 
tom. (By the way, is it your cus- 
tom to go to church on Sunday?) "In 
that synagogue was a man with a 
withered hand. Here occurs one of 
those incidental things, which are so 
full of beauty in these narratives. 
Seeking to find accusation against 
Him, His enemies nevertheless all 
unconsciously paid Him a supreme 
compliment. They associated Him 
immediately, not with the chief seat 
of the synagogue, but with the most 
needy man in the crowd." 

"They watched Him" (v. 2). The 
air was full of silent, malicious, cun- 
ning hatred. Jesus faced them with 
an alternative so high, so holy and 
exacting that they dared not speak. 
He pointed out that we either do 
good or harm, heal or kill, by our 
response to a human need. It can- 
not be ignored. What would they 
do with it? Keep their strict man- 
made regulations, or honor God by 
helping a needy one on the Sabbath? 
They dared not answer. 

Then He healed the man. He did 
not touch him. He did not do any 
work, except a miraculous healing. 
But it was enough. The Herodians 
and the Pharisees, who hated each 
other, now became friends because 
they both hated Jesus. 

What an awful picture of what 
may be in the human heart, even in 
the Lord's house on the day of wor- 
ship. What was in your heart when 
you last went into the church? Love 
and a desire for the good of your 
neighbor, or hatred and malice? 

Here again our Lord declared the 
dignity of man in the plan of God, 
and placed his need above the keep- 
ing of a day. We are too little in- 
terested in the help we can give, and 
too fearful of the criticism of others. 



- BULLITTSYRXE CHRISTIAN 
CHURm 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt 






FORTY YEARS AGO 



From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY 13, 1904 ■ 



\ 



Taylorsport 

Henry Myers, of Cincinnati, O., 
spent a few days last week with 
Thomas Clore. 

Charles Hood and wife, of Cin- 
cinnati, are visiting L. H. Sprague 
and wife. 

Landing 

Garfield Slater, of Southfork, 
and Jess Jones, of Midway,' took 
dinner with Harry Jones and wife 
last Sunday. 

J. T. Markesbery and family, of 
Hamilton, moved here last Satur- 
day. 

Hebron 

Hubert Conner and wife will 
give the young folks a dance at 
their pleasant home' near here, 
Wednesday night. 

B. E. Aylor has sold his farm be- 
tween here and Bullittsville to his 
brother, Huey, who now lives near 
North Bend. 

Idlewild 

Miss Alberta Gaines was the 
guest of Miss Pauline Winston, on 
Friday. \ 

Mesdames Charles Balsly and N. 
S. Walton are on the sick list. 
Florence 

Miss Lottie Williams, of Cincin- 
nati, is the pleasant guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Bradford. 

James Hickey has returned home 
from Maysville, where he has been 
for several weeks, visiting rela- 
tives. 

Gunpowder 

B. A. Rouse, and wife were vis- 
iting in Hebron last Sunday, guests 
of I. Rouse and wife. 

Henry Ross and wife and Lou 
Clarkson and wife, of Frogtown, 
were guests of B. C. Surface, last 
Friday. 

Verona 

George Johnson's family has 
moved to the dwelling df Mrs. Pat- 
sy Carlisle. ; ' • 

We leam that J. G. Tomlin, of 
Walton has purchased the Riley 
property in town, and will lay it 
off in town lots. 

Petersburg 

Arthur Terrill has a copy of a. 
New York paper that is 103 years 

old. ***Si 

William Casey'-y?! Missouri, is 



visiting friends at this, his old , 
home. 

Commissary 

Martha Randall, daughter of 
Mrs. Randall, living at Ed Botts' 
has pneumonia. 

Miss Mary Gaines was the guest 
of Misses Stella and Artie Ryle last 
Friday night. 

Flickertown 

Bob Patterson is building two 
new sleds for Miss Julia Smith.' 

George Ruth, of Petersburg, 
hauled ice from here to fill his 
large ice house, last week. , 
Walton 

C. S. Chambers, who has been 
home for several weeks, accepts 
a fine position with the Columbus 
Com. College. 

Miss Souder, of Mt. Vernon, is 
the guest of Mrs. Ruth Hind. 
Limaburg 

Miss Nellie Kirkpatrick, df Bur- 
lington, spent last Wednesday 
night and Thursday with Miss 
Pearl Aylor. 

George Gordon and family were 
visiting John Aylor and family, 
Sunday. 

Hathaway 

Will Price and wife were the 
guests of G. A. Ryle and wife, of 
this place last week. 

G. L. Smith and wife spent Wed-» 
nesday as guests of P. P. Neal and 
wife, of Buffalo. 

Belleview 

Born to Oscie Rice and wife, on 
the fifth, a nine-pound boy. 

Charlie Maurer was in Cincin- 
nati several days last week. 
Personal Mention 

John P. Duncan left last Friday 
for Macon, Ga., where he may con- 
tract to handle trotting horses the 
coming season. 

J. H. Ryle, of Florence, was 
among the visitors in town, last 
Thursday. 

Erlanger 

Miss Martha D. Piatt entertain- 
ed the junior social club last Sat- 
urday evening. 

Irma Dell Mitchell, young 
daughter of Mr. Joseph Mitchell, is 
very ill with pneumonia, but is im- 
proving slowly. 

Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope yon will eventnal- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

the first man you meet. 






FULL CREDIT 



■ 



given on 






ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

| TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 

H Phone ERL. 87 Ambulance Service 

IlllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 



*» 



that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 
elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 



STITH 



FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EVES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 



r i2 {^fM'l iMK^ i!j^mA llUJJJLrJLeinM^I7i 






_ 



j. 










THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



HEBRON 



Sterling Dickey spent Monday, 
> kn. 3 with his parents, Mr. and 
i trs. J. S. Dickey, at Corinth, be- 
ire leaving on January 6 for Ft. 
lomas, ■■ where he entered the 
ly service. 

Ir. and Mrs. Wm. England as- 
lbled a group of relatives and 
lends at a six o'clock dinner on 
Wednesday evening in honor of 
their son Robert, who was home 
If a week from Great Lakes, 111. 
7 \e guests were Mr. and Mrs. Elm- 
q Biller, Mr. and Mrs. Everett Lan- 
^ter and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
fred Jones, son and daughters, 
and Mrs. Harry Prable, Mr. and 
Robert England, Mrs. Addie 
jk>r and the host and hostess. 
Mrs. Hubert Conner and Pvt. 
Elmer S. Dickey, called on Mr. and 
!ty >s. Ed Baker. Sunday afternoon, 
w \o have had the flu. 
, (Irs. Robert Aylor, who has been 
i^-for several weeks does not Im- 
prove very rapidly. 
iWrs. James Tanner has the flu. 



Pvt. Elmer S. Dickey spent Sat- 
urday night and Sunday at home. 

The following officers were elect- 
ed at the Lutheran Sunday School 
last Sunday morning: Superin- 
tendent, Woodford Crigler; assist- 
ant Superintendent, Chester Good- 
ridge; secretary, Miss Jean Poston; 
treasurer, Dallas Conrad and pian- 
ist, Mrs. John Conner. 



POINT PLEASANT 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Beil and 
daughter, Mrs. Margaret- Beil, of 
Bromley and Mr .and Mrs. Adam 
Wernz were guests Sunday of Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Wernz and Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Wernz and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Wernz were 
guests Saturday evening of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Garnett, of Ludlow. 

Mr., and Mrs. Geo. Wernz visit- 
ed Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Kenton and 
family, Saturday night. 



Go to your local bank and sub- 
scribe for your War Bonds now — 
help Boone County go over the top. 



JANUARY 

WHITE SALE! 



BE WISE AND BUY YOUR 
WINTER NEEDS NOW! 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter Jean entertained Mon- 
day evening for Rev. and Mrs. E. M. 
Helton and son, Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Kilgour and daughters, Mr. and 
Mrsi John Jones, Earl Washmuth, 
and! son Earl Jr., John and Chris 



A LETTER 

The following letter was receiv- 
ed from Mrs. Carrie Graves Dove, 
a former Boone Countain, who now 
resides at 7267 Franklin Ave., Hoi 
lywood 46, Calif.: 
"Dear Sirr 

"I wonder who the editor really 
is and if I ever knew him — seems 
strange not to know. 

"After spending yesterday with 






Whitaker. 

MJ\ and Mrs. Fred Reitman and the Rileys of Pasedena and read- 
Mrs. Alice Hunziker and children ;hjg-their Recorder, I made up my 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. j mind I would give myself a Christ- 
William Reitman. I mas present I could enjoy all thru 

Mf. and Mrs. John Whitake: 1944. ^ 

spent Sunday with Mrs. Dorothy j "Yes, I am one' of those Boone 
Rylej, of Cincinnati. i County folks that enjoy The Re- 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour en- ! corder more than Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
tertained Seaman and Mrs. Law- even if I do have to read the '30, 
rencie Wilson, Thursday. 40, 50 years ago' page first. 

Mf. and Mrs. Howard Wilson en- «what is there about Kentucky 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Bernard t h at makes every one blow about 
Wilson and daughters and Mrs. being from there, even if -they 
Evelyn Wilson, Sunday.; were only born and lived there the 

Mr. and Mrs. John Whitaker call- . ten following days? Why my chil- 
ed on Mr- and Mrs. John Jones, ; dren > s chest expansion increases a 
Friday night. Igood ten inches every time anyone 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Clark spent ^ care iess enough to ask where 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Virgil , ^ ne y are f rom 

Campbell and son. Mr. and Mrs.j , _ Recorder 

Doc Black caUed in the afternoon.! °* course x reaa ine Kecoraer 

Mr. and Mrs. William Blaker and , £ ^SSoS^f^SSS cT- 
children were Sunday guests of his!,* Jud S e cropper is really car- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker. ! roU Cr °PP er - 2 C0U ^ I , kn ^ W he 

was wise enough, but it is alarm- 



start a 'please find enclosed' note 
and end with a 'Gone With The 
Wind' letter? 

"But may I wish for all of you a; 
Peaceful and Happy 1944? 
"Sincerely 
CARRIE GRAVES DOVE." 



: * 



Sheets, pillow cases, blankets, yard goods, sheet- 
ing, muslins, flannels, cretonnes, tubing, ticking, 
toweling, etc. 

Special table of mussel soiled and 
damaged ODDS and ENDS at half price. 

Men's, Women's and Children's Wear 



You get most for your Shoe Stamp when you buy 
'Star Brand," "Poll Parrot," and "Endicott John- 
' shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 



son 



prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. 



BUY WAR BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality" — Tour Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



Mrs. Evelyn Wilson spent Friday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Wil- 
son. 

Mrs. Ada Gross and daughter 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Col- 
lins and Mrs. Minnie Shawe, Sun- 
day afternoon. 



Now's the tune to get into the 
drive to raise $500,000.00 in Boone 
County in the Fourth War Loan 
campaign. 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 




All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

CARDOSI 

Rear 24 East Fifth St. 
COVINGTON 

Phone Hemlock 8689 
Residence Phone Florence 386 



I 



ing to find out he is old enough 
to be a judge — but I guess Judges 
and Colonels come younger' in 
Kentucky than anywhere else. 

"It makes me very proud to 
know the boys that I new, grew 
up to be the Christian j en to take 
their fathers' and g\ indfathers' 
places in County and [ fate. You 
people that live back^there take 
that for granted because it has al- 
ways been that way, yut if you 
lived in Hollywood *the 'hand of 
the Isms and spams' as your Mr. 
Campbell of Bullittsburg once so 
aptly put, you would realize that 
there are many, many more thor- 
oughbred people than horses in 
Kentucky. Of course a husband 
gets shot once in a while, but most 
husbands need shooting? 

"Isn't this just like a woman, 





NATIONAL RED CROSS 

NURSING REPRESENTATIVE 
IN NORTHERN KENTUCKY 

Miss Esther Finley, Special Con- 
sultant on Red Cross Home Nurs- 
ing, is conducting conferences for 
instructors throughout Kentucky. 
She was at Covington Red Cross 
Headquarters all day January 6th 
and 7th. A large number of nurse 
instructors were present. Many 
problems, ways and means of 
teaching were discussed and those 
who attended feel much benefitted 
by instructions which were given. 

Miss Elizabeth Lowry, Boone 
County Red Cross Nurse attended 
both days. 



GASBURG 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

J. W. Marsh, Woolper Creek, Bur- 
lington, R. 2. 

Robert S. Hood Estate, Constance 
Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1944. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
'at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 






SELL YOUR TOBACCO 



WITH 






co Whse. Co. 



a., Ky, 



lone 57 



Phone 57 Cynthian 

Where You Can Get A Quick Sale 

5 -BIG HOUSES -5 

1 

Ybu Do Not Hav4 To Register 

YOU CAN BE UNLOADED RAPIDLY AT THE HOUSfc IN FRONT OF THE SALE, THUS ASSUR 
ING YOU A QUICK SALE. 

SOME OF OUR HIGH CROP AVERAGES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 



Jack C. Martin & Earl Kearns 
Mrs. Marshall Bell & Felix 
R. O. Haviland & Son . . . 

L. E. King* ,. 

Mrs. M. D. Martin & Harp 



Lbs. 

..' 5274 

King 10800 

4056 

1884 

5222 



W. W. Ammerman & Bela Workman 5490 

Tomsie Browning & Son 1640 

Alfred McMurtry & Tucker ; : . . 1738 

Felix E. King ! 1610 

Walter McCauley & Son .... 2596 

Henry Judy ,..2632 

Russell Stevens ■ 2994 

Raymond Florence i . J 5326 

Leslie & Stanley Pepper 4902 

Mrs. Mary L. Cook & Webb , .2574 

J. C. Barnes & Son 2008 

Wm. N. Murphrey 2328 

Newton Kearns & Lemons 1 3162 

H. C. & James Patterson 720 

Mrs. Mayme McMurtry & Hill . . .* 2424 

Rodney Kearns & Mullen ....... ....2266 

Charles & Albert Pulliam ■ ,..1402 

Mrs. Ora McNees & Furnish 810 

Jesse Northcutt '.-. . 1 3482 

J. N. Kimbrough & Son '. . t . . 4068 

Richard Eals & Pope * 3000 

Gus Lang & Son p 4362 

Clarence & Elmer Geoghegan ! .3416 

Collis Maffett t 1308 



Avg. 

$60.31 
60.02 
59.14 
58.11 
57.16 
57.59 
57.27 
57.29 
58.32 
56.20 
56.17 
56.41 
56.42 
57.92 
57.76 
56.26 
55.15 
55.12 
56.00 
55.45 
55.37 
55.33 
55.53 
54.80 
54.38 
55.45 
55.22 
54.51 
54.28 



Lbs. 

Roy & Norman Taylor : 3462 

B. ;C. Dillion & Alva Parsons 2100 

Roy Taylor 5956 

Roy Levi & Kearns 5882 

wJ T. Courney & Son ..? ' .2114 

Sherman Goldie .4890 

W. A. Gossett & Lantern t 3564 

Roy & Norman Taylor ......1638 

J. | P. Deniston '. 2118 

Mrs. L. D. Stewart & Son 1048 

R. M. Collins & Fogle 2664 

Mi:s. Russ Hickmart & Dailey .! 2054 

J. P. & L. P. Chamberlin & Sort 1978 

H^rry Conyers 742 

Sam W. Arnold 1566 

R. M. Collins & Son 1088 

Myers & Culley 450 

Clarence Teegarden & Son 1022 

Chas. W. & W. R. Jennings , 7198 

Mrjs. Mary Current & Megibben 5748 

J. T. Gillig & True 5030 

Mrs. Laura Conner & Wiggins 2062 

Lep Dryden 4312 

O. | C. Laughlin & Snapp ■. 2028 

Harvey Palmer & Son 706 

Mrs. Pearl Craig & Bowman 1424 

J. W. Showalter & Glasscock 562 



• 



Avg. 

54.81 
58.00 
55.87 
55.25 
55.08 

55.15 
56.30 
55.84 
56.40 
56.52 
56.02 
55.87 
55.61 
56.36 

56.14 
56.56 
56.37 
56.26 
54.23 
54.78 

54.30 
54.71 
55.03 
54.42 
54.39 
54.83 
55.52 



Mrs. Urbie Sanford and son spent 
one day last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. Nat Rogers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rogers moved 
to the Scott farm Saturday. We 
regret to lose these good people. 

Mrs. Hugh Arnold spent one aft- 
ernoon last week with Mrs.< Chas. 
White. 

Quite a few in this neighborhood 
are ill. Mrs. Hugh Baker and Mrs. 
John Aylor with the flu; Duane 
Townsend with the mumps; and 
Mrs. Nat Rogers with a severe^ cold 
and Mrs. John Klopp with flu. 

Mr. and Mrs. Costa Polly, of 
Westfort, Mass., who are the house 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Bak- 
er spent the week-end with their 
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Ber- 
nie Mullenkamp, of Aurora. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and son 
Don Ray, spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. John Klopp and Miss 
Gladys. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Aylor 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard Huey. 

G. C. Rector and Cleve Aylor 
called on W. O. Rector, Sunday 
morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Arnold spent 
Friday with Mr. and Mrs. John 
Rogers. . 

Mrs. Allen Rogers called on Mrs. 
Ben Stephens,, recently. 

Mrs. Floyd Snyder spent Wed- 
nesday with Mrs. W. O. Rector and 
Mary and assisted them in pre- 
paring dinner for the butchering. 

John Klopp spent Friday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Pope. ^ 

Don't forget the Homemakers' 
meeting at the home of Mrs. L. S. 
Chambers in Petersburg, January 
13th. 

Mrs. Everette Wolfe spent one 
afternoon this week with Mrs. W. 
O. Rector. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Bufcham 
spent Sunday with relatives in 
Belleview. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



PAINT SPECIALS 

All-Purpose Enamel $1.98 
Quick drying; good cov- gal 

erage; all colors. 
Guaranteed 

HOUSE PAINT $1.69 

All colors; regular $2.25 gal. 

value. 

RED ROOF PAINT $1.19 

For metal; regular $1.75 gal. 

value 

Wonder Flow Paint 2.19 

Dries 1 hour, over wall- gal 

paper or paint; pastel 
colors. Equal in value to 
$2.95 advertised paints. 

All-Purpose Varnish $1.75 

$2.45 value. . [ gal. 

Black Screen Enamel 45c 

75c value. Quart 

Aluminum Paint >1.75 

Chrome finish. 3uart 

GORDON SUPPLY v,0. 

736 MADISON AVE., COVINGTON 



YOU WILL FEND US ON THE FLOORS AT ALL TIMES LOOKING OUT FOR YOUR INTERESTS 

WHEN TOBACCO IS BEING GRADED AND SOLD. 



J. R- Peak Ross C. Pepper Vii 

Phono 136 Phono 418-W 



D. Florence W. B. Tucker 

Phono 406 Phono 278 



JHXH3HS»EwaKIKSW«XHIH2HS5, 




n 

1 



FOR VIM AND VIGOR 



• At work or play, you can't 
do your best with eyestrain 
or visual defects. Glasses, if 
needed, or lenses that bring 
your present glasses up to 
date, will add to your enjoy- 
ment and good health. 

Today it's your patriotic 
duty tc see better, feel better 
and work better. Come in for 
careful examination of your 
eyes. 






CONSTANCE 



Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Kottmyer 
spent Friday evening with their 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer, 
of Hebron. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dolwick's 
son Earl, who Is in the armed 
forces was home for a few days' 
furlough. 

Mrs. Lena Fritz and Miss Josie 
Wischmeyer spent Friday with rel- 
atives in Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Elmer Peeno has been on 
the sick list the past week. 

Alfred and Louis Dolwick butch- 
ered hogs last Wednesday. 

Mrs. Charles Hodges, Jr., and 
Mrs. Duncan Huey spent Friday in 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Henrietta Craven and Mrs. 
Hazel Kennedy went to a show on 
Sunday afternoon in Cincinnati. 

The Ladies' Aid of- the Constance 
Christian Church will meek Thurs- 
day afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
Henry Kottmyer. 

The Constance Homemakers 
spent a most enjoyable day last 
Wednesday at the home of Mrs. 
Lena Fritz. ,- 



SMALL GROWERS URGED 

TO POOL SWEET POTATOES 

Pooflng of crops to make up 
carload lots of sweet potatoes, and 
sharing of curing and storage 
facilities were urged this week by 
the War Food Administration to 
help dispose of ,the bumper crop of 
sweet potatoes that threatens to 
swamp the market. 

"To meet the requirements of the 
government's support price pro- 
gram, sweet potatoes must be de- 
livered in carload lots, said Daniel 



K. Young, state supervisor, of the 
Food Distribution Administration. 
"Growers who do not have a large 
enough crop for a full carload 
should make arrangements in ad- 
vance with other growers to pool 
their potatoes to make a load." 

Sweet potatoes must grade U. S. 
(No. 1 and be packed in rigid con- 
tainers, as well as loaded in cars, 
to get the support price of $1.15 
per bushel this fall. The support 
price rises to $1.50 for cured po- 
tatoes in rigid containers in Janu- 
ary, and $1.65 in February arid 
thereafter through the season. 
Prices for U. S. No. 2 grade with 
75 percent TJ. S. No. 1 quality will 
be 15 cents per bushel less than 
the price for U. S. No. 1. While 
prices are considerably above the 
support level now, if a large num- 
ber of green sweet potatoes are 
marketed this fall, prices may drop 
considerably. In that case the 
growers may w^ish to take advant- 
age of the government's guarantee, 
the FDA official pointed out. 

"The obvious way for the grow- 
er to make more money on his crop 
is to cure and store the potatoes 
for winter or spring sale," Mr. 
Young said. "While a small grow- 
er may not have curing and 
storing facilities, and may not 
wish to rent space himself, grow- 
ers can profitably share space in 
suitable buildings." * 

Growers were also warned to put 

in orders for rigid containers early 

because of the shortage of crates 
and hampers. 



Buy War Bonds and do your part 
toward an early Victory. 



SCNXNXHZHZHZHZMZHXHXHZHXH 



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TARPAULINS 

AFTER SELLING YOLtR TOBACCO, STOP AND 

SEE OUR LINE OF TARPAULINS 

All sizes — Prices reasonable. 

WE DO REPAIRING 

Covington Awning & Roofing Co. 

Yi sq. south of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse '■ 
301 Scott St. Covington, Ky. Hiland 1735 




DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 
FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 
AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

uBOCBETTco. 



-i 



D!XIE HIGH WAY at Groves 

1 AGEH: OECUGE FLEMING 



Suburban jewelers exclusively 
with modern stores in: 
MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD • MADISONVILLE 




Sbon'tA 

-NEGLECT YOUR PROPERTY 
MAKE REPAIRS -fyoiv! 

See Uf About a New Rod 
or Needed Roof Repairs 

Ten can't afford to 1st your horn* depreciate for need of • 
dependable, weather- tight roof. Wo are roofing specialists, 
prepared to give you prompt service — to um the biggeat-value 
roofings money can buy— -CAREY Asphalt Shingles. You* 
choice of beautiful, non-fading colors. We handle all details. 
Mo red tops. Call, or come in and see us today. "■* 



•Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 



^••^ 



#x 



STANDARD FOR OVER 60 YEARS 

DOFING & SHINGLES 



> 




McVDLLE 



I day ,*$ an all-day meetft®. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Scott spent 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



•■ »xi. t^i\i flua. o. n. scon spent 
Mrs. Edward Rogers entertained Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Vernon 
the Missionary Society- - of -- the Vernon Scott and son. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Ctare and 



Belleview Baptist Churcli-'Wednes- 



Do you feel 

"left out of rt 

■ 

Are you missing the chance 
to share in this war — missing 
, .an experience you'd value all 
t , your life? 

,' k R3ght now. in the WAC, you 
.» could be doing a vital Army 

' job. "You could be getting valu- 
able training, meeting new 

i , people, seeing new places while 
serving your country. 

More Wacs are needed at 
once. Get full details about 
eligibility, training, pay, the 
jobs Wacs do, how they live. 
Go to the nearest U. S. Army 
Recruiting Station. (Your local 
post office will give you the 
address.) Or write: The Ad- 
jutant General, Room Ul5, 
Munitions Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Do it today! 




children, of Norwood, O., were , week 
calling on Mr. and Mrs. Les Ryle 
and family, Sunday. 

Mrs. Alice Aylor was dinner 
guest of Mrs. Clarence Wolfe and 
Mrs. Mary Tandy, Tuesday. 

Seaman Wayne See, Jr., is 
spending his furlough with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne See 
and family. 

Pfc William R. Presser, at Min- 
neapolis, Minn., was calling on 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rogers and 
family, Wednesday afternoon- 
Mr. and Mrs. Oakley Lambert, 
Cincinnati, O., were visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. Elmer Jarrell, Sunday. 

Mrs. William Kruse has been 
staying with her daughter, Mrs. 
Lawrence Siekman and Mr. Siek- 
man, Rising Sun, IncL We extend 
our deepest sympathy to Mr. and 
Mrs. Siekman in the loss of their 
infant daughter. 

Mrs. Mabel Abdon and family 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Jess Louden, Jr., and family. 

We welcome Mr. and Mrs. Tom 
Rogers into our community. They 
moved into Mrs. S. B. Scott's 
house. ........ 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Sutton, who 



have been very ill are much im- 
proved at this writing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Lucas, Er- 
langer, have been visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Kruse and family,; this 

- ■'. a nwoiS ! 
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Rylei and 
Phyllis have moved to Erlanger, 
Mr. Ryle has accepted a position 
there as bus driver. We regret to 
lose these people from our commu- 
nity. 

^We extend sympathy to Mr. Will 
Brown and Mrs. Brown in the 
death of his sister in Owenton. 



iMSHSNSMXIIXMSHSHXHXMXHZNXNXHXHXHSNXNZHXHZHXNZHSN^ 



iULlJ^SVILLE HOMEMAKERS 

It takes more.: than flear zero 
weather : to. daunt "Bullittsville 
Homemakers. With the tempera- 
ture hovering Just above zero, a 
goodly number gathered at the 
home of Mrs. Robert Grant on Dec. 
16 for the regular meeting, and a 
Christmas party, , . ■ 

With a great deal. <©f enthusiasm, 
the project of the day,. "Making 
an Afghan" engaged the nimble 
fingers of the group. , 

Miss M. H. Gillaspie spoke on 
meat canning and salvage, after 
which leaflets were distributed. 
The happy day ended by singing, 
"We'll Sing Our Way Home," and 
voting Mrs. Grant the perfect hos- 
tess. 

January meeting will be with 
Miss Mattie Kreyllch. 

— Club Secretary 



HllllllllllllllfllHIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 
AT THE 

Gayety Theatre 

t . f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m*i i r 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

TONIGHT AND FRIDAY 

How a likeable young Japan- 
ese graduate of an American col- 
lege is transformed into a ruthless 
militarist, with tragic consequences 
to himself and his family, is dram- 
atically told in RKO Radio's new 
film, 'Behind the Rising Sun. 



the music with His Texas Play- 
boys in Columbia's Russell Hayden 
western, "The Lone Prairie" at the 
Gayety, wasn't in Hollywood long 
before he went into business. Wills 
bought out a haberdashery store in 
the ghost town of Porestville and 
is now making a tidy sum renting 
the riding accoutrements to Coast 
studios. 

Also 
In addition to becoming Ameri- 
ca's outstanding quartette, the 
Mills Brothers have attained great 



RIVER VIEW 



• 



Sorry to hear of the illness of 
Bill Feldhaus, John E. Hodges K Mrs. 
Dora Hodges and Mrs. D. E. Ogden. 
We wish for them a speedy recov- 
ery. 



MY 4-H PROJECT 



My project was garden. I had 
all kinds of vegetables. It was 
planted late in July. I had pota- 
toes, .toma toes, beans and pickles. 
I had jjabout tea bushels of toma- 
Miss Londalea Ryle, of Coving- j toes, six bushels of beans and one 
ton, spent the week-end with her bushel of pickles. The tomatoes 



«"s? ± James *• tssr. !"?* «»*«» taS»voK«*sj 

VZZSLSS* £*3 JSH* # - !5 *■*•»• and 6o^ 



N 



WHY SELECTIVE REGISTRATION 

PROTECTS BUYER: Too many times the buyer has accepted 
an implied "guarantee" in the registration certificate that was 
hot there in fact. Ancestry was guaranteed, but the KIND of 
ancestry was not. Buyers of Registered Jersey Bulls now have 
assurance that their interests are in part protected by a study 
of the production history in the immediate ancestry of their 
bull calf. . 

S. WHITEHOUSE DUNLAP-FARM 



Herd T. B. and Bang Tested 



L. C. FISH, Herdsman, 
Richwood, Kentucky U. S. 



25 



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CONSTANCE P.-T. A. 

The Constance P.-T. A. will hold 
its monthly meeting, January 19th 
at 2:00 p. m. at the schoolhouse, 
according to Mrs. Adam Dolwick 
publicity chairman. 



ftHXHXHaHXHaHXtoXHXHXHXHXIIXHXHXHXOTHXHXHXHXMXHXMXHXHXlK 



Boone County Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE 
ESTATE OF MARY FRANCIS 
GAINES, DECEASED 

I The Administrator of the estate 
of Mary Francis Gaines has filed 
his settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any person having 
exceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before February 
7, 1944 (Next Regular Term of 
County Court). 30-2t-c 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk 
Boone County Court 



• 



the newspaperman's 13 years' ex 
perience in Tokyo, the picture 
graphically reveals the secret 
schemes of the Japanese war lords 
and their reason for the sneak at- 
tack on Hawaii. 

Margo, Tom Neal, J. Carrol Naish 
Robert Ryan ahd Gloria Hplden 
head the cast of the picture, which 
was directed by Edward Dmytryk. 
SATURDAY 
Little Diana. Hale, age seven, is 
a full-fledged motion picture ac- 
tress. But like so many of her 
older colleagues, her personal fin- 
ancial status is jSlpictly out of her 
control. In this, case, it is Diana's j Gavetv 
mother who holds I the purse- 
strings. 

Diana plays -the role of a prob- 
lem child in Paramount's "The 
Good Fellows." In private life, 
Diana is a problem, too, and is 
kept on a strict financial basis. If 
she eats all of the food that is 
placed before her; Diana's mother 
gives here a penny a day. 
* * * 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

George Hale, well known New 
York theatrical executive and pro- 
ducer, was engaged by Universal 
to stage the musical production 
number in Olsen and Johnson's 
new comedy, "Crazy House." 

foS. 6, r ™ ent } y of the ,_ Versailles, All persons having claims again- 
famous Broadway nightclub, has st the state of Mrs Emma Green, 

nrnH? Clated t >f S 6uux E*"^ deceased are requested to presen 
or producer with numerous stage 1 

success. He produced the recent Al 

Jolson show, "Hold On To Your 



America. These unusual singers 
are in "Rhythm Pa* ftde,"; the Mon- 
ogram musical picture in which 
they are featured with Gale Storm, 
Robert Lowery, Margaret Dumont, 
the famous "N.T.G." and the Flor- 
entine Gardens Revue, and Ted Flo 
Rito's Orchestra. 

• • * 

WED., THURSDAY & FRIDAY 

Eve Arden, who made a hit in 
the Broadway musical comedy, 
"Let's Face It," has the same role 
In the Paramount film version 
which co-stars-Bob Hope and Bet- 
ty Hut ton and which will be at the 

ayety. 

The talented Miss Arden will be 
seen as a mischevious, restless wife 
who suspects her husband of phil- 
andering and is determined to do 
something about it. What she 
does involves Bob Hope in some of 
his worst — and funniest — film 
troubles. 

Others in the cast are Dona 
Drake, Cully Richards, ' ZaSu Pitts, 
Marjorie Weaver and Raymond 
Walburn. The film retains some 
of the original Cole Porter music 
that was written for the stage ver- 
sion, all top tunas 



parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ryle. 
Miss Velma Lee Black is spend- 
ing a few weeks with Mr. and Mrs. 
John Black and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Williamson 
and family of McVille, spent Sun- 
day with her parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Chas. Craig. 

Mrs. Henry Black and mother, 
Mrs. I. D. Isaacs and Mrs. Hazel t 
Smith and Miss Gladys Isaacs were 
shopping in Covington, Friday. 

Several relatives and* friends of 
Mrs. John Black called on her the 
past week and to visit the new boy. 
He has been named Donald Leon. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard McCubbins 
and family, of Walton spent the 
week-end with her mother, Mrs. 
Maude Hodges and family. 

Miss Thelma Hodges is staying 
with J. J. Scott and family this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black and 
Mrs. Hazel Smith spent the day 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. I. D. 
Isaacs. Rev. Carl Wainscott call- 
ed in the afternoon. 

W. B. Stephens spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Hubert Clore, of Lick Creek. 
Sorry to hear of the death of Mr. 
Chas. Newcomb and Mr. Harrison. 
We extend sympathy to the rela- 
tives of both. 



were worth $40, beans $18 and the 
pickles were worth $4, with a total 
amount of $62.00. We canned 
about aU of it. I had a lot of fun 
while I was working. 

Clarence Harold Austin, 
Age 12 Years, 
Constance 4-H Club. 



iimiimiimmiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiii 

New James 

Theatre 

Beginning Sept. 25th . One Show 

Each and Every Night at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

War Time 

BARGAIN NIGHTS MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland in 

"GIRL CRAZY 

FRI. & SAT., JANUARY 14 & 15TH 



ADMINISTRATRIX' NOTICE 



Hats." 






TUESDAY 

Bob Willis, currently 



supplying 



HANSER OPENS NEW STORE 

Hanser Jewelry & Music Cov, re- 
cently opened a store at 515% 
Madison Avenue. Covington. 

The company will sell guitars 
and other musical instruments, 
Roy Acuff and other guitar, cord 
and instruction books, Gibson and 
Black Diamond strings for all in- 
struments and other accessories 

The store will also maintain ; 



Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, in 

IT AIN'T HAY 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16TH 



Joan Davis, Jinx Falkenburg, in 

TWO SENORITAS 
FROM CHICAGO 

MONDAY, JANUARY 17TH 



See one of the greatest pictures of 
year 



same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle immediately with the com P lete musical, watch and clock Till O I 1UI1 if) Ul air- 
undersigned, repair department. [ I tllO LAND IS MINE 



\ 



29-2t-c 



Irene Green, 

Administratrix 



"Ships are essential to Victory, and we shall continue our job of building them 

" 't^i^t^JLZ:^:! ^^' Resident, Bethlehem Steel Company 






■ ? 




with 
Charles Laughton, Maureen O'Hara 

TUES. & WED., JANUARY 18 & 19 



Boone County Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF 
GUARDIAN OF BEN AL RILEY 
Alma B. Riley, Guardian of Ben 
Al Riley, has filed her settlement 
in the Boone County Court and 
any person having exceptions to 
file to the settlement must do so | 
on or before February 7, 1944, j 
(Next Regular Term of County I 
Court). 30-2t-e 

CD. BENSON, Clerk THURSDAY, JANUARY 20TH 

Boone County Court iiuiiiiiii|||iini| lilIlliiilli| - ||IIIII1||i|1|i|1Si j 



I 



Vera Dale, Wm. Lundigan ,in 

HEADIN' FOR GOD S 
COUNTRY 









WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 

BABY CHICKS 

We Sell DR. SALISBURY'S Poultry Remedies, 
Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

512 Pike St. L— -ULUU-— , HEmlock 9168 

Covington IfrA i f i Jffill ffifl °P en Sundays Till Noon 



JANUARY FURNITURE CLEARANCE 

NEW 2-PIECE LIVING ROOM $|*Q.75 

SUITES; Regular $79.75 value *>** 

Buy Now and Save $10.00. 
Store Wide Reductions Ranging from 10 to 50% 

THE DINE-SCHABELL FURNITURE CO. 

Covington, Ky. 



521 Madison Ave. 









-i 






'". 



Bethlehem in '43 built 380 fighting and 
cargo ships. 

i A Y^f ue of the Yea*^ program equivalent to 
1,000 Liberty ships. 

,« iQ4*'£i, SH iT P tZ$L W ^ a number to Spare ' was *■ ""4* Production delivered by BethlebenV 
in 1943 to the United States Navy, the British Navy and the E S. Maritime Commission. This ZTZ 
was the greatest in magnitude and diversity ever accomplished by a private builder in *e wo^rV 
history. It marked the fulfillment of a promise made by Bethlehem a P year ago tobuSd in 19 W 
average of "a ship a day" of major fighting and cargo crafc< \ 

cr»(t J hC ?* ° f f ipS indU , deS airCfaft ««*«.'«*«* destroyers, virtually every type of fighting 
S^tSbL!! " f nUm ^ ° f ^ Ship$ ** odief ^vessels. In addition, Tthlehem S 

the va^T £ ? 0gKU ? *? Liberty ShipS ' a P**M ^ «> forty IJbertyShipsrand 

Port off Notional Progr«, m -Bethlehem is permitted to publish tfaese'factsas-part of WcountrvV 

SSCC" 7 *? U S ' NaVy ■" dd " U ' S ' Mari^Commission, AmtLvd^K- 

1943 has been a national triumph of production. 1 ' pouiicung m 

We salute our fellow shipbuilders and their distinguished records; 

We thank our thousands of suppliers whose efforts have been essential to our contribution, 
We congratulate the men and women in the Bethlehem organization; in shipjards, 8tee I plan*, 
lactones, mines, and in every division, all of whom have had a part in this effortX 
Horder T«k ttioMj, year's work' in Bethlehem's^hipyards, Tsteermills and otnerdewrtments 
has been done by 300,000 men and women. More will be neeXTAlready . larger an^Sag^k 
has been assigned to us for 1944. We shall undemke that J^M^M^^^^U^Z 
at maximum pace, jo liasten the day of Victory/ '-^^ * 












. .j 

* 38 TYPES OF SHIPS * 

Program 70% righting Craft; 
' 30% Cargo 

Bethlehem's total wartime shipbuilding pro- 
gram includes approximately 1,000 fighting 
and cargo ships, 70% of the program being in 
fighting craft, and 30% in cargo. These are of 
3« different types including the following: 

FIGHTING CRAFT 



35,000-Ton Battleship 
13,000-Ton Heavy 

Cruisers 
10,000-Ton Light 

Cruisers 
5000-Ton Light 

Cruisers 



2,106-Ton Destroyers 
1,620-Ton Destroyers 
Destroyer Escorts 
Tank-Landing Craft 
Infantry-Landing Craft 
l4,700VTon Aircraft 
Carriers 



Wanted 

Stenographer in Law Office, Erlanger, Ky. Per- 
manent position. Excellent opportunity for 
right person. 






HARRY L. RIGG 



27,000-Ton Aircraft Carriers 
CARGO SHIPS 

Liberty Ships j Other type Cargo Ships 

Victory Ship? Single-Screw Tankers 

C- IB Cargo Stops Twin-Screw Tankers 

C-3? Cargo Shfps Ore Transfer Ships 

C-3 C^go Combat Ships Trawlers 
Pasjenger-and-Cargo Ships Fleet Tugs 

25,000-Ton Ore-and-Oil Carriers 




USED OAR BARGAINS 

1937 DODGE COACH :$350 

1937 OLDSMOBILE COACH $375 

1937 (TWO) STJJDEBAKER COUPES ..$350 

1936 CADILLAC , $325 

1939 HUDSON 4-DOOR $695 

1938 OLDSMOBILE SEDAN $445 

1937 FORD COUPE $295 

1^37 CHRYSLER SEDAN $295 

1936 NASH SEt)AN $265 

1939 DODGE 4-DOOR SEDAN $695 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 

1937 PACKARE COUPE $345 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN ...$245 

1938 WILLYS S«DAN $325 

1937 WILLYS SEDAN $275 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP L 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



1 



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THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



t 



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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

1 Seen And Heard 1 Around 1 

\e£oanty Seat | 



• Harold Snow, of the U 
who 




^IIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

Mrs. Lamar Congleton Is ill 
with pneumonia., 



Mrs. Bess Rouse 
days last week. 



was ill several 



Miss Eunie Willis has returned 
to her work, after spending sev- 
eral weeks at her home here. 



■. -'Ms. ««d , Mrs. Albert. Sebree and 
son wei-e chopping in Covington, 



Saturday. 



■ ^vyf* 



HP 



.Mrs. William Huey was recently 
employed by an X-ray supply house 
In Cincinnati. 



Mrs. Alva Snow was removed to 
Christ Hospital last week, sufferr 
ing from pneumonia. 



Roy Cress, of Harrison, O., spent 
New Year's Day with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Crsess. 






Creed Harris of the U. S. Navy, 
who is stationed in California, is 
spending a leave with Mr. and 
Mrs. Sam Blackburn. 



Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Rouse and 
family spent Saturday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Rouse, of 
Florence. 



1. •«, 



llllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllilllliili 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kelly have 
purchased the Leslie McMullen 
property here, now occupied by Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert Sebree and son. 



Mrs. Harry Holtzclaw and two: 
children moved to Dayton, Ohio, 
this week-end, where her husband, 
Lt. Holtzclaw is stationed.. 



George Walton, who is spending 
the whiter months with his nephew 
Noel Walton and family, has been 
ill for the past few days. 

Mrs. Joe Huey was taken to a 
specialist in Cincinnati Saturday 
for X-ray pictures of an infected 
ankle, which she has had for sev- 
eral weeks. 



Pvt| Leroy McNeely, of Sheppard 
Field, Texas, spent the week-end 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
R. McNeely and attended church 
here, Sunday night. 



John Herbstreit and Elmer 
Reeves, Constance fanners, were 
Wednesday afternoon visitors in 
Burlington. While here Messrs. 
Reeves and Herbstreit called at The 
Recorder- of fice, having their sub- 
scriptions moved up another year. 



Q 



IN MEMORY 

OF OUR FATHER AND 
ASSOCIATE 

C. Scott Chambers 

who died January 12, 1943 



MARY and WALLACE K. GRUBBS 



mmmmmmmmm/i 



^SHXMXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHZHXHXHXHXMXHXHXHXHXHZHXMXHXg 



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Resources Increasing . . . 

Resources December 31, 1943 $1,536,891.28 

Resources December 31, 1942 $1,379,351.18 



I 1 



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A twelve months gam -iv**?. -..v. . $ 157,540.10 

In addition to this gain, our customers have pur- 
chased several hundred thousands of dollars in 
War Bonds. 

Peoples Deposit Bank , 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



H 
MX 



Capital $50,000.00 



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S. Navy, 
has not been home for five 
years, is spending a furlough with 
his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Alva 
Snow. ' «J 91< 

-. — - o Jri^ijod 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bentham, of 
Balitmore, Md., have returned to 
their home, after spending the 
holidays with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. O. Hempfling. 



Surplus $100,000.00 | 



!HXHXHSH3H3HXHXHXHSH3H£MXHSHXHXHXHXHXMSHXHXHXHXHXMSB£ 



The Home Store 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiii 
DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle ea. 6c 



PTZ POWDER 
PTZ POWDER 



1 lb. $1.60 
..5 lb. 7.50 



APPLES 

ORANGES 

GRAPEFRUIT .. 

KALE 

HEAD LETTUCE 

CELERY 

CARROTS 






i • * . . «^ • *. . 



pound 12c 

dozen 35c and 45c 

2 for 15c 

2 lbs.' 25c 

..each 15c 

. . v.. bunch 15c 

. . ?. .2 bunches 25c 



GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 quart, 14 oz. 
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, No. 2 can 
PINEAPPLE SLICED, No. 2H can. . . . 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2, Sliced 

PLUMJ5, No. 2' . can 

PEACHES, No. Zy 2 halves 

TOMATO JUICE, 1 quart, 14 oz. ..... 

MIXED VEGETABLES, No. 2 

PINK SALMON 

SWEET POTATOES ... 







► . • ^ 






NEW ORLEANS SYRUP 
NEW ENGLAND SYRUP 
KARO SYRUP, White .. 



...... 



.... 







each 35c 

.,...', 15c 

.36 points 28c 
..30 points 25c 
.15 points 20c 
.27 points 27c 
...6 points 25c 
. . 14 points 13c 
.14 points 27c 



..gallon $1.35 

pint 25c 

.....pint 15c 



| .47 -IN. 12-IN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD I 
26-IN. MED. WEIGHT 6-IN. STAY 

4-FT. POULTRY FENCE 

4-POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll. 



? ENCE. , 



rod 55c 

rod 50c 

rod 60c 

$4.50 



400 LBS. 24% DAIRY 

100 LBS. 16% DAIRY 

100 LBS. SHELLED CORN . $2 90 

100 LBS. GROUND WHEAT .j. ...•[]. $ 2 90 



.$3.15 
$2.90 



WOOD HEATING STOVES $5 . 50 to $10.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3-room size. . $45 00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4 -room size ...,] $60 00 

GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Mrs. Chas. Beil, of Harrison, O., 
and Mrs. Jas. Bullock, of Hebron, 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Calvin Cress. 

• ■ • <' •*■, 

Robert England of the U. S. Navy 
arid 'Wife were dinner guests one 
night last week of Mr. and Mrs. A. 
H. Jones and family. ; 



Mr. and Mrs. David Osborne and 
daughter of Florence and Miss Vir- 
ginia Crisler, of Florence were 
business catters' 1 ^ this office Fri- 
day afternoon. 

Callers at this office Saturday 
afternoon from various sections of 
the county were: Mrs. Virgie Sull- 
ivan, Burlington Rl; Albert Schwi- 
bold, Florence; J. E. Weaver, Union 
and Omer Macrander, Florence. 



Pfc. Wrh. R. Presser returned to 
Minneapolis, Minn., after spending 
a few days' furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Presser 

SubfeWtters Vfeftirig' : " Wr> P* office 
Friday afternoon were Mr. 
and Mrs. John W. Conrad, Walton; 
Earl Johnson and son of Ludlow, 
R. 2; and Mrs. Fannie Utz, Flor- 
ence. ^ 



Pvt. James Gayle Smith, of 
Keesler Field, Miss., was one of 
three in a group of eighteen in his 
hut who passed his examination to 
train for a flying • cadet. He ex- 
pects to study navigation. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Maurer en- 
tertained with a dinner at their 
home last Wednesday evening. 
Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Luther 
Smith and 'family. Mr. and Mrs. 
Rdscoe Akin and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Rudicill and son, Mr. 
and Mrs. Raymond Combs and son 
and Mr. and Mrs. Pete Stephens. 



Mr. and Mrs. Dawson Day and 
family entertained Sunday with a 
lovely turkey dinner' in honor of 
their daughter Cpl. Mary (Betty) 



Day, who has been spending the 
past ten days with her parents on 
Woolper. She returned to San 
Antonio, Texas, Monday of this 
week, Quests were Mrs. Helen 
Brown and husband of Cincinnati, 
Mrs. Roscoe Curtis and Joyce Finn. 



TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION 
THANKS BOONE CO. FRIENDS 



I, as Executive Secretary of the 
Boone County Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation, wish to thank the good 
and civic-minded people of Boone 
County for purchasing Tuberculosis 
Christmas %esti&. 3 x als<r wlSrl to 
thank the publishers Off this paper 
who gave many, many lines of free 
space to promote the sale of the 
seals, and to the teachers and 
pupils who have worked untiringly 
to make the sale a success. 

It seems that our goal will fall a 
little short, but even at that, Boone 
County people have purchased 
more Christmas Seals than any 
other time in history. We will give 
you a complete statement of the 
sale as soon as all the schools re- 
port. • 

Remember too, it is not too late 
to send in your dollars for seals. 
R. V. LENTS. 



BELLEVIEW CHURCH OF CHRIST 
Sam Hamilton, Minister 



Bible School 10:00 a. m. CWT. 
Tommie Stevens, Supt. 
Worship Service 11:00. 

A nice sized group attended the 
ordination service last Lord's Day. 
Jack Purdy, newly elected Elder, 
and Wilbur Denniston, Deacon. 
were set apart to the work of min- 
istering, in due and ancient form. 
Elders W. G. Kite and Tommie 
Stevens acted for the congrega- 
tion, in this matter and following 
the Apostolic precedent imposed 
hands upon the two newly elected 
officers. . 

All the former officers being re- 
elected they were then duly charg- 
ed with their Scriptural duties and 
obligations and inducted into of- 
fice for the ensuing year. The- of- 
ficials for the year are, W. G. Kite, 
Tommie Stevens, and Jack Purdy, 
elders, serving 3, 2 and 1 year 
terms respectively; Allen Rogers, 
Elmer Jarrell, Harry Ashcraft, 
Dudley Rouse, and Wilbur Dennis- 
ton, Deacons. The following Dea- 
conesses are to serve the congre- 
gation for the year: Nannie Ca- 
son, Nellie Ryle, Mrs. John Hol- 



brook, Marguerite Rogers, Alma 
Batchelor, Rosa Stevens, Mattie 
Kruse, Helen Buckler, Irmel White, 
Ruth Ashcraft, Julia Jarrell, Pau- 
line Rouse, Martha Wolfe, Jean-- 
etta Purdy, and Allene Holbrook. 



BURLINGTON MAN FELT 

LIKE SWOLLEN BALLOON; 
FULL OF STOMACH GAS 



Recently, a Burlington man stat- 
ed that he used to feel like a swoll- 
en balloon after every ifr^al. He ' 
would bloat full of gas and 1 spit up 
acidulous liquids for hours after 
eating. Was terribly contipated. 
This man is one of the hundreds in 
this vicinity who now praise ERB- 
HELP. He states he; was amazed at 
the results when he took this med- 
icine. Now he eats what he wants 
without gas or bloating, and bowels 
are regular for the first time in 
years. He feels like a new man. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don' t go on Suffering! Get ERB 
HELP; Dahlenburg's Drug Store, 
Erlanger. 







:.'■■ 



■<-■'■■ 



come 






a 




THE "shock troops" of your Government's 4th War 
■ Loan Drive — a drive that must raise $14 billion to 
put the punch behind the punch that may make 1944 
the date of doom for the Nazis — will soon call on you to 
buy your personal quota of Bonds. For/ of the $14 
billion that must be raised in this Drive, $5.5 billion 
worth must come from individuals. 

Welcome these American men and women — 5 million 
of them — who are nc*t only buying their share of Bonds 
but are giving their time to call on you, personally. 

Every office, every plant, every home, every individ- 
ual in America has a quota to meet. Your personal 
quota is at least one extra $100 Bond. That's above your 
regular Bond buying. 

If possible, buy your extra Bonds during this drive at 

the plant or office where you work. A volunteer Bond 
worker will sell you there. "Otherwise, welcome him to 
your home when he calls. Or find one in the thousands 
of retail stores all over the United States. They want 
to find you— you must help see that they do. 

If you are unable to make your purchases from a 
soldier of victory be sure to go to one of these dther 
special War Bond stations to buy your extra Bonds: 









. 


















BANft AND TRUST COMPANIES 

U. S. POST OFFICES 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS 

BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS 

BROKERAGE AND INVESTMENT FIRMS 

MOTION PICTURE THEATRES 

CREDIT UNIONS * 

CERTAIN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES 

NUMEROUS CORPORATIONS AND FIRMS FOR Tl 

PRODUCTION CREDIT ASSOCIATIONS 

NATIONAL FARM LOAN ASSOCIATIONS 

MISCELLANEOUS BOND BOOTHS 

RADIO STATIONS 

RETAIL STORES 

NEWSPAPERS 



: 



■ .- 



. 









Remember your job in this 
Drive is to buy more than your 
share of Bonds. That's the only 
way you cart be certain you are 
still backing the attack. So be 
ready to meet your War Bond 
representative with an open 
check book. 




This sticker in your window 
means you hove bought 
4th War Loan securities. 



\t*«K BACK THE ATTACK! 

This Advertisement Sponsored by the following Patriotic Business Concern 

ANTEN'S FOOD MARKETS 



FLORENCE 



ELSMERE 



% 



i 



1 ■ 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



liiiimiiiimimniuirnitiiiirmiinimimii 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

iiiimimiiiiijiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimii 

John W. Lose, Constance, Ky.. 
newly inducted personnel of the 
United States Army has been sent 
forward from the Reception Cent- 
er at Fort Thomas, Ky., to 4th En- 
gineers, Camp Gordon' Johnston, 




• 



$ 



m 



R 



■ ■ 






H 



I 



> . 



I 



■ 






REJUVENATE. 

• mafcs far r»« win i 
to fed u If r *«r Ucfet tau toco n- 
Mwri. RdtoC «her Mw 

amiclej and mrn, »f f ordi ■ 
•Bd-mlnd comtoK. t»«, tkey 
look M brltht M IN fecit 

DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OFFICES WITH 

O T C H 

Opticians — Jeweler* 

•13-15 HaOlMa Ave., Covin* toa 
SINCE 1857 



1 







I 

m 



GIVE HER 

a permanent entitling her to 
lovely natural looking curls! 
Priced to fit any pocketbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious cold wave. 

Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 

FLORENCE, KY. 

■ Phone Florence 125 
Open Evenings 



Fla. He left Ft. Thomas, Decem- 
ber 29th. 

• • • 

The following noys in the armed 
services have had change of ad- 
dresses: 

S-Jgt. Robert F. Horton, 41st 
Bomb Group (M), APO 959, ASN 
35460797, care Pdstmaster, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Pvt. Ferda G. Gruelle, ASN 356- 
75370, Co. B. 152nd Infantry, 38th 
Infantry Division, Advance Detch. 
APO 9198, care Postmaster, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Word has been received that the 
two boys of the above addresses 
have arrived safely in Hawaii. ■ 

Pvt. Robert E. Craddock, Pit. 1101 
R. D. M. C. B., United States Ma- 
rine Corps, San Diego, 41, Calif. 

• • » 

Pfc. Harry T. Cook, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Mark Cook, of near Bur- 
lington, has been assigned' to the 
Sioux .Falls Army Air Field, Sioux 
Falls, S. D., for training as a radio 
operator-mechanic. Upon comple- 
tion of a 20-week course, he will be 
fully trained to take his place as 
a member of a troop carrier crew 
of the Army Air Forces. 

Pfc. Harry (Hack) Cook, is a 
graduate of Burlington High 
School. He entered the armed ser- 
vice August 17, 1942 and spent 15 
months at Bowman Field, Louisville 

Ky., with the medical detachment. 

• * •> 

Stanley Tanner, S 2/^c, Bks. 66L 
Security Department, U. S. Naval 
Air Station, Memphis, 15, Tennes- 
see, writes: 

"I am sorry I haven't written to 
you sooner, but have been so busy 
that I haven't had time to write 
anyone. First I want to thank you 
for The Recorder as I sure do ap- 
preciate it, and I want to thank all 
my friends in Boone County for 
the lovely Christmas presents they 
sent me. 

"Maybe the year 1944 will bring 
us more happiness than '43, and 
maybe all of us boys and girls in 
the service will get to enjoy that 
good old turkey at home. 

"I received a letter from Bud 
Kendall the other day and he isn't 
very far from me, so I guess we 
will be seeing each other soon. He 
saw my address in The Recorder. 

"Robert Sullivan and James 
Haynes are still here with me, but 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






th<> way things look we might not 
bejtogether much longer. 

TTell the people in Florence, 
there is a little town down here 
ca|led Hollywood. It is laid out 
on| the order of Florence and the 
people are just as friendly. It really 
is swell to feel as though you are 
almost home." 



-•Illlllltllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

NO PRIORITIES 

I Are Needed For Farm Tools 
| To Be Welded | 

I R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY I 

| 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir 



$nd Lt. Lorraine Reimer has been 
sett from Ft. Devens, Mass., ^to 
Camp Lee, Va. Her new address is 
24$rd Station Hospital, Camp Lee, 

She states that she receives The 
Boone County Recorder regularly 
anjd is very grateful for this court- 
esy, that it is next to receiving a 
letjter from home. She is always 
gl^d to receive a line from any of 
her friends back home. 
* • • 

"phe following letter was received 
frdm C. J. Tinkelenberg S 2/c USS 
Hilary P. Jones, care Fleet Postof- 
ficp, New York, N. Y.: ' 

"I am finally settled and will 
serid you my new address. I: sure 
do appreciate The Recorder ahd I 
always look forward to receiving it. 
I'vi been wondering the past couple 
of weeks how Boone County bas- 
ketball is coming along. I'd give a 
lotj to be able to see one of Bur- 
lington's games. c 

"I haven't much time, so here's 
hoping you had a very Merry 
Christmas and that you'll all have 
a Happy New Year. 

"Thanks again for the paper." 

The following letter was handed 
us for publication and was written 
by Cpl. Edward P. Robinson, color- 
ed, Btry H, 90th Coast Artillery 
Anti-Aircraft, APO 700, care Post- 
master, New York City, N. Y.: 
"First Baptist Church 
care Wallace E. Strader, Secretary 
Burlington, Kys 
"Dear Friend and Brother: 

"It is my request that you read 
this message to the people of our 
church: " I: 

A New Year's Message: Light 
Your Candles 

"As the dawning year is fast ap- 
proaching; in fact just a few days 
off, and since it is known by us 
all, that it will have been reached 
by jnany through blood and tears, 
my thoughts springy upward to a 
most high God, who through His 
infinite wisdom, knowledge, and 
mercy can and will do all things 
wellL And who at a twinkling of 
the] eye, cause all hostilities to 
cease; even unto the drama of life 
itself. It is henceforth my request 
and desire to make this plea to the 
praying public, that we may enter 
into! the New Year upon bended 
knefes, humble hearts, and willing 
minds, so as to act obediently to 
the Master's will throughout the 
ensuing year. As we see now and 
have known in ages past, that the 
superior men of all races and na- 
tions are depending and striving 



I 



for peace through and by means 
of destruction of mankind. Though 
was as children of light know that 
a peace gained in this manner 
cannot and will not be a lasting 
peace. As we are told by His word: 
"That not by might nor by power, 
but by Spirit' sayeth the Lord. 
Therefore let us resolve to lift up 
voices, send up our petitions on 
and in the behalves of our fathers, 
sonsr husbands^ and friends who 
are now serving somewhere. As we 
read of riots and clamorings in our 
own lands and among our people, 
it showers us with this thought: 
that we as Negroes have so many 
justifiable complaints that it is easy 
for us to stand around and curse 
the darkness. But remember the 
old Chinese proverb which states: 
'It is far better to light one candle 
in the darkness, than to stand 
around and curse the darkness.' 
What we need.even more than con- 
structive criticism, is to have some 
one tell us how to light up the 
darkness. Of course we will not 
be able to wave a magic wand and 
bring into being an electric flood 
light, but we — each of us — can try 
to light our own little candles in 
the darkness; and we can be sure 
that if enough of these candles 
are lighted, there will_be sufficient 
light to help us make our way 
gradually out of the darkness. 
The world is in outer darkness, but 
we are trying to bring light by the 
roaring of cannons, when it would 
be so easy to by faith and trust let 
God do the job for us, who in the 
beginning said: 'Let there be light' 
and there was light. No — we can 
not all shoulder a gun; but we all 
can send up our prayers to the 
One and only Master, Lord and 
Saviour of us all. As a New Year's 
resolution let us therefore resolve 
to pray as Daniel prayed who 
deemed it necessary to pray three 
times a. day. I further resolve and 
request that the Secretary of this 
church send copies of this message 
to similar houses of prayer thru- 
out the vicinity, that it may con- 
vey this > thought, 'Though we are 
separated in person we are still 
united in Spirit.' 



FLORENCE 



A\ 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER FOR SALE TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER AT MY FARM LOCATED JUST OFF 
GOODRIDGE DRIVE, FLORENCE, KY., (LO()K FOR THE 
SIGNS) ON 



JAN. 15 



1:00 P.M. (CWT) 

The following: One good team of work horses;? 2 milch cows, 
one with calf by side and one to freshen in June; one gilt, weigh 
abut 250 lbs.; 50 Plymouth Rock pullets, ready to lay, and 4 
young roosters; 3 ton good mixed hay in stack; 1 good double 
set of harness; 2 spools of 3-point barb wire; Ideal mowing 
machine in good condition; hay rake; 2 turning plows; David 
Bradley 2-horse hillside plow; laying off plow; double shovel 
plow; 5-tooth cultivator, good as new; disc harrow, in good con- 
dition; 2-horse spring wagon; 2 sleds; 20-gallon lard kettle; 
chicken feeders; crosscut saws, and a lot of items too numerous 
to mention; 

Terms: GASH 

Clarence Rogers 

Owner 

DAVID TANNER, Auctioneer 



Mrs. Irdell Fox and son Bobby 
have returned home following a 
a two weeks' visit with relatives in 
Latonia. 

Friends of Mrs. Jennie Bauers 
regret to learn of her illness the 
past week. 

Mrs. Albert Avery and daughter, 
of Erlanger visited Mrs. John M. 
Connley and sons on Wednesday 
afternoon. 

Prof. F. D. Caton and wife were 
called to Pineville, on account of 
the death of his father. 

Henry Durr has returned to his 
home after being discharged from 
army duties on account of his 
health. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kleemier and 
Mrs. Amanda Aylor and son Bobby, 
and Louellen Aylor spent a pleas- 
ant evening Tuesday with Mrs. 
Martha Richards and son Jerry, of 
U. S. 42. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Miller and 
son entertained Saturday evening 
with a six o'clock dinner in com- 
pliment of Mr. and Mrs. M. Gra- 
ham of Ft. Mitchell and Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Hogan, of Covington. 
R. Haugher has returned to his 
home after a two weeks' visit with 
relatives in Indiana. 

Miss Mary Pressler and Miss 
Mary Eljen Zimmerman, who has 
a nice position at the telephone ex- 
change has rented a room from 
Mrs. Irene Renaker for the winter. 
Mrs. Emma Griggs left Saturday 
for Jeffersonville, Ind., to visit her 
sister, Mrs. Ben Cluster and hus- 
band. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Rouse enter- 
tained- a group of friends and rel- 
atives on Saturday evening in hon- 
or of her husband's birthday an- 
niversary. * I 

Mrs. John Schram and Mrs. 
Clyde Arnold spent Thursday with 
Mrs. Ossman, of U. S. 42. 

Mrs. Mary Fulton opened her 
home on Shelby St., to the mem- 
bers of the Lloyd Society on Sat- 
urday for an all-day meeting. A 
delicious turkey dinner was served 
at the noon hour to the following 
guests: Mrs. Ella Anderson; Mrs. 
Mable Sayre, Mrs. Ann Conner, 
Mrs. John Schram and daughter, 
Bonnie, Mrs. C. T. Blankenbeker, 
Mrs. Sarah Markesbery, Mrs. T. 
B. Castleman, Mrs. John Tossett, 
Miss Florence Marquis, Mrs. Lloyd 
Aylor, Mrs. J. P. Tanner and the 
hostess. A most enjoyable after- 
noon was spent. Mrs. Fulton prov- 
ed herself to be a most charming 
hostess. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor and 
family spent Friday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Aylor and fam- 
ily, of Goodridge Drive. 

Walter G. Richardson, husband 
of Vera Sowers, a former resident 
of Florence passed away at his 
home in Norwood, January 4. Ser- 
vices were held Friday afternoon. 
Burial was in the Florence Ceme- 
tery. 

Friends regret to learn that the 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Bethel are suffering with scarlet 
fever. 

Mrs. Morris Snelling and chil- 
dren, of Devon, visited her sister, 
Mrs. Amanda Aylor and son on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Francis Souther, of Latonia 
spent the week-end with Mrs. Mil- 
burn Mills and daughter, of Lloyd 
Ave. 

Friends regret to learn that Mrs. 
Louis Houston is quite ill at her 
home. We wish her a speedy re- 



covery. 

Wm. Phillips was ill several days 
last week. 

Quite a number here have had 
the flu during the past two weeks. 

William Snyder and wife visited 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. T. 
Snyder on Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Roberts were 
dinner guests Friday evening of 
Pvt. and Mrs. Robert H. England. 

Friends of L. C. Acra regret to 
learn of his illness the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. England en- 
tertained Friday, his mother, Mrs. 
Naomi England, of Hebron and 
Mrs. Lida Jones and son Wayne, of 
Burlington. 

Lowell Sorrell, of Limaburg, 
spent Saturday with Mrs. Emma 
Hambrick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Aylor had for 
their guests Sunday, their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Rogers. 

Robert H. England left Friday 
night for Great Lakes, 111., after en- 
joying a 15-day furlough with his 
wife and other relatives. 

Pvt. Denmitt Craycraft, of Fort 
Lewis, Wash., spent a few days last 
week with his sister, Mrs. Floyd 
Sininger of Route 42. 

Mrs. Mamie Moss opened her 
home on Sanders Drive Tuesday 
evening to a group of relatives and 
friends in celebration of her birth- 
day anniversary. Approximately 
thirty-five* persons were present 
for the buffet luncheon. A most 
enjoyable evening was spent in 
games and other entertainment. All 
left wishing her many more happy 
birthdays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Houston en- 
tertained with a dinner Wednes- 
day in honor Of Mrs. Houston's 
birthday. Guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Hobert Roberts and son Tom- 
my and Danncy and Geo. Houston. 

Pvt. John M. Connley, .-of Ft. 
Custer, Mich., spent the week-end 
with his family, here. 

Dode Pope, of Covington visited 
his brother Lawrence Pope on 
Sunday, who Remains ill. 

Mrs. Mary E. Rouse celebrated 
her 92nd birthday, Wednesday. 
January 5th. She is enjoying good 
health. Some of her friends call- 
ed in the afternoon and presented 
her with a lovely birthday cake 
and gifts. Her niece, Mrs. Geo. 
Porter sent her a lovely cake. 

Anyone having items for this 
column please leave on Monday 
morning at Ed Osbom's or Flor- 
ence Drug Store or call Florence 
447. News items about our com- 
munity mean much to our boys in 
service. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Harve Baker and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. George 
Markesbery spent a pleasant even- 
ing Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. W. 
M. Markesbery and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Delahunty 
spent Sunday afternoon with Rev. 
Oscar Huey and wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kyle, Mr. and 
Mrs. Lester Craycraft spent an en- 
joyable evening with Mr. and Mrs. 
Floyd Sininger, Tuesday. 

Friends of Mrs. Stanley Lucas 
regret to learn of her iHness. 

Bernard Scott and wife spent a 
pleasant evening Thursday with 
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. England. 

Mrs. Grace Acra and son Billy, 
of Kentaboo and Wilf ord Baxter 
and family visited Mrs. John M. 
Connley and sons, Sunday. 

Eugene Frodge of the Navy visit- 
ed his aunt, Mrs. Floyd Sininger 
and family on Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tanner en- 
tertained with a family reunion on 
Sunday in honor of their son 
Stanley, who is spending a few 
days* furlough with home folks. 

Mrs. A. C. Scott spent Monday 
with her mother, Mrs. Lee Eddins, 
who remains ill. 



Why Suffer With 
Your Feet? 






WATERLOO 




N. TtJLCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 

Our years of research have 
proven that foot comfort depends 
on foot balance. 

For years men have been guess- 
ing about foot balance, putting 
steel support under feet ■ and 
elastic, bands around feet, all sizes 
and shapes corn pads, plasters, 
callous plasters, etc. Yet people 
continue to suffer with their feet, 
legs, back and with various other 
aches and pains, resulting from 
feet in numerous cases, because 
they never had their body weight 
properly balanced on their feet 
with shoes. 

Your feet may look regular to 
you, but, naturally you cannot de- 
tect weakness or have any way 
of testing for unbalance. But re- 
memhef: "Fat on the ribs" is by 
no means an adequate criterion of 
physical well being. 

Don't take chances. If you are 
suffering with leg pains, knee 
pains, stiffness, backaches or severe 
headaches, or sleep poorly and are 
always tired, your feet may be the 
cause. — Adv. 




^owm 



OUR JOB 

PRINTING 

IS RIGHT IN 

THE GROOVE 



Milton Brown was inducted into 
the Army from our neighborhood, 
Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Purdy, Bert 
Newhall, W. G. Kite, Eugene Purdy, 
Grace Sanford and Mrs. Geo. Wal- 
ton were shopping in Covington 
the past week. 

Miss Betty Dean Ryle was the 
week-end guest of Miss Mary Lou 
Williamson. 

Byron David Purdy ,and Mrs. 
Clifford Pope have been on the 
sick list. 

Bro. and Mrs. Sam Hamilton and 
daughter were Sunday guests of 
the Dud Rouses in Burlington. 

Miss Corrine Walton and baby 
brother Donnie were Tuesday 
guests of their grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Willie Huey, of Belleview. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee McNeely and 
son Pvt. Leroy McNeely and girl 
friend, Miss Hancock were visiting 
relatives here, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Klrb Conner spent 
a part of the holidays at their 
home here. 

Glad to report Mrs. Jake Cook 
and little Jeanette Mallicoat im- 
proving from severe illness. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 

Features Shoppers' 
Lunch 

A special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 2^c 
should, be of special interest 
to Boone County shoppers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE 



ATTENTION, SHIPMATES 

ALL NAVY, MARINES AND COAST GUARDSMEN 

Here is your organization — join the Navy Club of the U. 
S. of America. Chartered by an Act of Congress 1940. The 
only National Service Organization exclusive for men who 
have served at sea or who is Honorably Discharged from the 
Service in any way. Meet your shipmates in the local club. 

Write: S. D. HEMPFLING, SENIOR EXECUTIVE OFFICER 

Of Cincinnati, Ohio 

Branch, Constance, Ky. 






LOWER GUNPOWDER 



Ed Binder has moved to his 
farm in Ohio. 

-Miss Lena Binder moved into the 
brick house on the place she pur- 
chased, known as the Binder place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff and 
daughter and Miss Jackie Goshorn 
of Florence, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Love spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Sebree. Afternoon call- 
ers were Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff. 

Gene Schwenke called on the 
Sebrees, Sunday morning. 

Emerson Bunger called on the 
Shinkle family Sunday morning. 

George Harrison passed away 
Friday morning. Funeral services 
were conducted Sunday afternoon 
at Big Bx>ne Baptist Church, with 
Rev. Roy Johnson, officiating. 
Burial was in Big Bone Cemetery. 

Mrs. Frances Shinkle was called 
to the home of her mother, Mrs. 
George Smith, Saturday to attend 
the funeral of her uncle Charley 
Newcom. Burial was at Paint Lick 
Cemetery, Monday. 

HanseJ Williamson was home on 
furlough last week. 

Ji E. Hodges and Bernard Hodges 
and wife are improved at this writ- 
ing. 

Buddy Huff and Perky Love 
spent Sunday with Miss Gypsy Se- 
bree. 

Vic Hamilton was having some 
work done at Omer Shinkle's shop 
Saturday. 

Bro. Hogan preached at Big 
Bone Baptist Church, Sunday 
morning and evening. 



CROP 



DIXIE BRAND 






SEEDS 



SOLD ONLY AT MILL'S 


















High in germination and purity . . . 
best all-around results assured. We 
advise you to buy them at your 
earliest convenience . . . begin now 
to make 1944 the biggest year you 
ever had . . . it's up to you! 






. 



Same high quality since 1863 



KEEP ON 




with WAR BONDS 



CEORCE W. 



Since 1S6S 

ILL 



AND 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 
I SINCE 1863 



y/ 




THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1944 



11 
I 




TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY 10, 1924 



/ 



Nonpariel Park 
Mrs. Luther Renaker and daugh- 
ter, Prances, were week-end guests 
of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Franks, of Mt. Zion. 

Dr. T. B. Castleman and wife 
and Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lucas 
attended the theater in Cincin- 
nati, Wednesday evening. 
Gunpowder 
H. F. Utz went to Burlington on 
business last Friday afternoon. 

A cold wave struck our ridge 
last Friday night, and the thermo- 
meters registered four below in 
some places. 

Lower Gunpowder 
Clyde Clements, wife and chil- 



Verona" 

Rev. and Mrs. A. K. Johnson, 
of Latonia, spent New Year's Day 
with Mrs. J. M. Powers. 

Eugene Roberts and two sisters, 
Katie and Eva spent one day with 
their sister, Mrs. Mattie Ransom, 
of Latonia. 

dren were visiting Lennie Hub- 
bard and family, last week. 

Oth Hubbard and wife gave the 
young folks a dance, Tuesday 
night. 

Big Bone 

Clifford Moore and sister spent 
Saturday night with their sister, 
Mrs. Conner Carroll. 

William Huff, Jr., and wife are 



State No. 73-423 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

Of Burlington in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts * $ 364,565.82 

United States Government obligations, direct 

and guaranteed 767,345.59 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 10,200.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures 120,856.00 

Corporate stocks . . . .. •,••••♦ 13.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 257,908.87 

Bank premises owned $16,000.00, furniture 

and fixtures $1.00 16,001.00 

Real estate owned other thank bank premises 1.00 



TOTAL ASSETS $1,536,891.28 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $ 468,449.89 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships and corporations 598,671.26 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) 165,293.22 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 114,761.70 

Deposits of banks 5,000.00 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc,) 317.69 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $1,352,493.76 



TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) i $1,352,493.76 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capitalt $ 50,000.00 

Surplus 100,000.00 



Undivided profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



34,397.52 
184,397.52 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS. ...; .$1,536,891.28 
+This bank's capital consists of 500 'shares common stock with total par 
value of $50,000.00. fc 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value): 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $ 427,500.00 

Assets pledged to qualify for exercise of fiduciary or 

corporate powers, and for purposes other than to 

secure liabilities \ 25,699.00 



.$ 453,199.00 



TOTAL . r 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law $ 177,349.88 



TOTAL 1 $ 177,349.88 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was 69,030.18 

.Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to 257,908.87 

I. G. S- Kelly, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of ■ the several matterns herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief . 

G. S. KELLY 
Correct — Attest: W. P. Beemon, S. B. Nunnelley, C. L. Cropper, Directors. 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of January, 1944, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

C. E. McNEELY. Notary Public. 
My commission expires April 5, 1945. 



Miss 



Miss 



rejoicing over the arrival of a 
baby boy. 

Hopeful 

Charlotte Bradford attend- 
ed the dance at George Clarkson's 
of Union, New Year's night. 

Mrs. Charles McDonald, of Cov- 
ington spent Wednesday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Gar- 
dener, 

Flickertown 
Hazel Akin, Alice White, 
Wilbur Snyder and C. J. Akin and 
wife, entertained with parties dur- 
ing the holidays. 

Master Leslie Voshell and Leslie 
Sebree's two boys have whooping 
cough. 

Hebron 

Edward Baker, wife and daugh- 
ter were guests of her mother and 
sister New Year's Day. 

Bessie, the little daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Jones, who had 
whooping cough and pneumonia, is 
improving. 

Devon 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Hudsell spent 
Christmas Day with Mrs. Annie 
Kennedy and son, Roy of Beaver. 

Mrs. Frank McCoy was the week 

end guest of Mrs. Roy Valland- 

ingham and family, of Sadieville. 

returning home Monday morning. 

Pt. Pleasant : 

Mrs. Estella Starcher and daugh- 
ter Sarah Virginia, returned home, 
after spending the holidays with 
friends at Clifton, Ohio. 

Mrs. George Heist and son Frank 
and wife spent the New Year with 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Barlow and 
family, of Estill County, Ky. 

Limaburg 

Miss Elizabeth Dean is the guest 
of her sister, Mrs. J. P. Brothers. 

Mr. Shelby Pettit spent Sunday 
with William Utz and family. 
Burlington 

Sheriff B. B. Hume and Attor- 
ney G. W. Tolin went to Frankfort 
on the "Adams Special" to see that 
the Legislature was properly set to 
work. 

Albert William, the little son of 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Weaver has 
been quite sick for several days. 

The wills of W. B. Norman, of 
Walton, Thomas Corcoran, of Bul- 
littsville and Mrs. Eugenia Blythe, 
of Burlington, were probated in the 
county court, Monday. 



LOCAL WORKERS HELP 

BETHLEHEM EXCEED 

SHIP-A-DAY PROMISE 



300,000 men and women from 
all parts of the country are shar- 
ing the company's honors in hav- 
ing achieved the greatest ship- 
building record in history during 
the year 1943 — 380 fighting and 
cargo ships. 

The government has permitted 
Bethlehem to reveal the fact that 
it exceeded in output its promise, 
which seemed fantastic when 
made at the beginning of 1943, that 
it would turn out a ship a day of 
major fighting and cargo craft. 

The remarkable program car- 
ried out by Bethlehem included a 
35,000-ton battleship, 27,000-ton 
aircraft carriers, 14,700-ton air- 
craft carriers, 13,000-ton heavy 
cruisers, 10,000-ton light cruisers, 
6,000-ton light cruisers, 2,100-ton 
destroyers, 1,620-ton destroyers, 
'destroyer escorts, tank landing 
craft, infantry landing craft, and 
many types of cargo ships includ- 
ing a large number of Liberty 
ships and Victory ships. 

The value of the year's work was 
equivalent to over 1,000 Liberty 
ships and, in terms of man-hours, 
the company estimates the 1943 
program was equivalent to the 
construction of 22 battleships. Ap- 
proximately 70% of the ships 
built were fighting craft and 30% 
cargo vessels. . ___ 

In addition to the amazing pro- 
duction record of hew^ships, Beth- 
lehem yards also repaired, con- 
verted and serviced over 7,000 
vessels, thus playin ga major ,role 
in keeping our fighting fleets in 
trim. 

Approximately 300,000 men -and 
women were employed by Bethle- 
hem in its shipyards, steel mills 
and other divisions to accomplish 
this program. But because the 
company has set its sights still 
higher for 1944 it will be neces- 
sary to add still more to its pres- 
ent army of employees. 



DEVON 



Kathryn A. Holzworth spent the 
past week with Mrs. Rose Luken- 
heimer, of Covington. 

Mrs. Ada Tanner has been 
rather ill at the home of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Holdis 
for the past week. 

Mrs. Frank Bresser was in Cov- 
ington, Friday shopping. 

Mrs. Jessie Wood and Mrs. Helen 
Scott received word of the death 
of their grandfather last week. 

West Scott received word that his 
aunt of Cincinnati was seriously ill. 
We wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tanner and 
family moved to -the Ray Rivard 
farm on the LLL Highway. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Feldhaus 
moved to the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Holzworth, Sunday aftern- 
noon. William is slowly ^ecoverins 
from an operation. 



HAMILTON 

, .^— — 

Lewis Ryle was in' Cincinnati 
Friday to take special treatment 
from Dr. Riddle. 

Harry Huff butchered hogs Fri- 
day. 

A large crowd attended the fu- 
neral of Mr. Geo. Harrison, Sunday 
afternoon at Big Bone Church. Mr. 
Harrison passed away at his home 
Friday morning after a long ill- 
ness. We extend our deepest 
sympathy to his wife and son Wil- 
liam, who is over sea. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hamilton were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Huey Ryle. Other guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Eldon Ryle and son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sebree on 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Lillie Huff spent Wednes- 
day with her aunt, Miss Maggie 
Taylor in Union. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wharton 
and son entertained Bro. Sam Ho- 
gan of Louisville, overnight Satur- 
day. ' < 

Miss Jean Love was the guest of 
Dorothy Shields. Sunday. 






REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



State No. 73-706 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



State No. 73-433 



Citizens Deposit Bank 

Of Grant, in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on De- 
cember 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts $ 91,156.35 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 36,535.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions : . . . 4,925.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures ,> j 19,205.00 

Corporate stocks ' L 151.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 72,950.35 

Bank premises owned $3,772.00, furniture and fixtures $1,174.00 4,946.00 



TOTAL ASSETS * $229,868.70 

LIABILITIES 

{ U Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $108,824.26 

Time deposit of individuals, partnerships and corporations. . 78,186.97 
Other deposits (certified officers' checks, etc.) 49.50 



TOTAL DEPOSITS 



• • • • 



■ •••■■•■•'• 



.... 



$187,060.73 



TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) $187,060.73 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capitalt .....$ 15,000.00 

*y Surplus < 15,767.50 

Undivided profits 12,040.47 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 42,807,97 



Hebron Deposit Bank 

• Of Hebron in the State of Kentucky at the close of business; on 
December 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts . . ; • $153,676.98 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 233,600.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures • • 5,800.00 

Corporate stocks • 300.00 

Cash, -balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 84,357.12 

Bank premises owned $1250.00, furniture and fixtures $1.00. . 1,251.00 



TOTAL ASESTS 



. .-$478,985.10 



LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $233,974.47 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 140,359.33 
Deposits of United States Government (including I 

postal savings) - *.i 58,305.33 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc) 1,259.63 

TOTAL DEPOSITS ......' , $433,898.76 



TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) • 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

SESf-. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:':::::::::::::■ mmm 

Undivided profits • • • • J'^S** 



3,898,76 

. .$25,500.00 



WALTON 



Sam J. Hudson left 'hursday'for 
Great Lakes, where hi will be sent 
to a school to study' torekeeping. 
He was home for a i pe-day fur- 
lough, after completi ? his boot 
training. b 

Mothers, let's jbty • the prayer 
league for our boy* , and girls, 
which meets daily at j p. m. Pray- 
er changes things. G d alone will 
help us down America js most dan- 
gerous saboteur. *j 

The members of Walton Baptist 
Church have purchased property 
on North Main St., now occupied 
by Ed Jones and family. 

Dan Bedinger's many friends are 
glad he is able to be out after a 
siege of flu. 

Citizens of Boone County, espec- 
ially those of us who have sons and 
daughters called by~gur govern- 



y^ur 



ment to fight for our beloved 
Democracy. Listen to the vbice of 
temperance, Sam Morris, each week 
day at 6:30 a. m. over WHAS, Lou- 
isville, and Sunday, Jan. 16th at 
12:45 CWT. Don't miss it, if you 
love your son and daughter in the 
service. Let's not leave a stone un- 
turned anywhere that we can help 
to save our precious boys and get 
them home as soon as possible. 
Please announce this noon broad- 
cast 12:45 CWT in your churches 
Sunday and return home to your 
radios. You will never regret your 
effort. 



******* 



KEEP 0M 

♦ WITH WAR BONDS • 

************* 



G 



AYETV 

THEATRE 1 



ERLANGER, ' ELSMERE, KY 

FREE PARKING LOl 

SHOW TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:09 and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 p. m 

Sunday 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p. m. 



TONIGHT and FRIDAY 

JANUARY 13 AND 14TH 



State No. 73-492 



*EPORT OF CONDITION OF 



Florence Deposit Bank 



Of Florence in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 
Loans and discounts (including $20.18 overdrafts) ...... — $189,493.39 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 220,500.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 5,000.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures .... 3.000.00 

Corporate stocks 1.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

' balances, and cash items in process of collection.....*... 193,289.56 
Bank premises owned $2,206.04, furniture and fixtures $1,955.74 4,161.78 
Real estate owned other than bank premises sold on contract 6,775.92 

TOTAL ASSETS $622,221.65 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations , $324,800.37 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. . 194,894.09 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings « '. 31,374.24 

Deposit of States and political subdivisions . . . 1 2,998.89 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, eto) » 9,484.71 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $563,552.30 



TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) . , $563,552.30 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capitalt >-.".. : $ 25,200.00 

Surplus j ".. 20,500.00 

Undivided profits < 12,969.35 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 58,669.35 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $622,221.65 

rThis bank's capital consists of 1400 shares common stock with total par 
value of $25,200.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assets (and securities' loaned) (book value): 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 
pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $140,000.00 




"Batman" No. 8 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 



TOTAL 

Secured and prefererd liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant to 
requirements of law 



.$140,000.00 



.$ 31,099.50 



$ 31,099.50 

.$ 31,652.89 



TOTAL 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to [ 193,289.56 

' I, H. A. Rogers, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth to the best of my knowledge and belief . 

H. A. ROGERS 
Correct— Attest: C. F. Blankenbeker, M. P. Barlow, W. R. Davis, Directors 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 8th day of January, 1944, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

A. M. YEALEY, Notary Public 
My commission expires March 8, 1944. 






State No. 73-619 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



Union Deposit Bank 



TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS . ... . 



>••*•••• •< 



45,086.34 



•1 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $229,868.70 

tThis bank's capital consists of 600 shares common stock with total par 
value of $15,000.00. J . • 

MEMORANDA 
L JOn date of report the required legal reserve against 

«jj. deposits of this bank was ,••••• $ 11,527.05 

v&Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to . . / '. 72,950.35 

I, C. E. McNeely, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm thai; the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of m y knowledge and belief. 
! '! C. E. McNEELY, Cashier 

Correct— Attest: A. Rogers, R. S. Hensley, Jno. J. Maurer, Directors. 
estate of Kentucky, 

County of Boone, . ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10 day of January, 1944, 
nd I heerby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

G. S. KELLY,. Notary Public. 
My commission expires February 27, i945. 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $478,985.10 

tThis bank's capital consists of 300 shares common stock with total par 

value of $25,500.00. 

MEMORANDA 

Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value): 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 
pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $160,000.00 



TOTAL - $160,000.00 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law $ 58,305.33 



TOTAL •' ^ 58,305.33 

On date of report the required legal reserve against • 

deposits of this bank was $ 24,758.54 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to ■ 84,357.12 

I John L. Conner, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several- matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

JOHN L. CONNER, Cashier 
Correct— Attest: W. W. Goodridge, B. F. Hossman, Hubert Conner, 

Directors. .] 

State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: .' J. • 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of January, 1944, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

ELMER GOODRIDGE, Notary Public. 
My commission expires March 29, 1946. 

> I 



Of Union in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 31, 1943. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including $6.23 overdrafts) .' $119,891.20 

United States Government* obligations, direct and guaranteed 135,200.00 
Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 73,863.31 

Bank premises owned $1,000.00 .' .' 1,000.00 

Real estate owned other than bank premises 1,169.19 

Other assets '. 76.50 

TOTAL ASSETS $331,200.20 

LIABILITIES 
Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $200,924.90 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 78,480.38 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) 10,347.50 

TOTAL DEPOSITS . . . 
Other liabilities 73.50 






TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below $289,826.28 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capitalt ... -. $ 25,000.00 

Surplus 6,600.00 

. 9,773.92 
$ 41,373.92 



Undivided profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS. 



.••••>•■ •••• 



<•■•*••• 



4*** Johnson 




Cartoon and Novelty Reel 



TUESDAY 

TWO BIG FEATURES 

...and io the molody 
g roo v« for you I 




WED.* THURS. & FRIDAY 

^ screen s greatest 
comedy team I 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $331,200.20 

tThis bank's capital consists of 250 shares common stock with total par 
value of $25,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law .• .$ 10,347.50 



TOTAL $ 10,347.50 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits, of this bank was , $ 16,419.15 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to 66,844.75 

I, Lillian Bristow, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true statei of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, tp the best of my knowledge and belief. 

LILLIAN BRISTOW, Cashier 
Correct — Attest: Thomas Huff, John H. Grimes, James A. Huey, Direct- 
ors, i 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ^s: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of January, 1944, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

SUE K. BRISTOW, Notary Public, Boone Co. Ky. 
My commission expires April 3, 1945. 
i # 




A Dona Drate-Cufly Richards 

En Anton • ZaSu Pitts 
¥ariorie Weaver- Raymond Walton 
News and Shorts 



For your convenience this 
Theater sell s WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 
bos office. • 



I 






I 

















s 




» 






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4VK4WMHUO. 


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\ 


1 


THURSDAY, 


JANUARY 


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. ! 






'" 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 












- 



Food And Home Notes 

Everyone knows 'about the "Pood 
fights for freedom" campaign 'that 
was started in November. All are 
asked to produce to" conserve, to 




•- 



Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far 
away front — send your smil- 
ing Valentine - Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. . 

Service Photo Studio 

804 MADISON, COVINGTON 

Studio Hours: 11 a. m. to 
9 p. m. daily. Sundays 1 to 

5 p.m.' ■ 



share, and to play square, so that 
all will have enough. Each home- 
maker can do her bit by watching 
and saving in all phases of home- 
making, according to Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, Home Demonstration 
Agent. 

Following are a few helpful hints 
given by the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Washington: 

Points For Fats 

For every pound of leftover fats 
that you take to the retail meat 
dealer, you will receive in addition 
to the usual 4 cents, two brown 
points from ration book three. This 
means more brown points for the 
housewife and more glycerine for 
the war. 

Kentucky's quota has been rais- 
ed from 2,424,000 pounds in 1943 to 
4,600,000 pounds in 1944. The col- 
lection at the present time is run- 
ning approximately 60 per cent of 
the 1943 quota. The only way that 
Kentucky can possibly hope to 
make the new quota is for both 
town and farm homes to do their 
part. 

Save 'Metal Jar Lids 
Save all metal jar tops this 
winter. The War Food Administ- 
ration advise houses. Especially 
worth saving are the small metal 
screw caps from coffee and other 
food jars, known as "size 63." 
Coffee -jars on the market with 
paper caps can be used for can- 
ning with cap saved from other 
jars. In canning, the screw caps 
are put over metal discs which fit 
the top of the jar and have a rub- 
ber like compound on one side. 

Care According to Container 
Now that cooking fats, salad oils. 



coffee and other fatty foods are 
selling in glass instead of tin.ithey 
need to be kept in a place tlfet is 
dark as well as cool to hold (heir 
good flavor. Specially colored glass 
is sometimes used to protect fats 
against rancidity, or clear glass 
jars are wrapped to shut out light. 
Foods in paper containers need to 
be carefully guarded against in- 
sects and moisture. Very often 
they will keep better if they are 
removed from the paper package 
and put. in tightly covered tins or 
glass jars. 

Popcorn 

Popcorn loses its popping power 
if it becomes too dry. The steam 
that forms from moisture inside 
the kernel causes the popping. 
When popcorn does not pop well, 
put a tablespoon or two of water 
in a glass jar, fill the jar with the 
corn, shake it up and let stand a 
week or so. That will restore its 
popability. 

Pressure Cookers Unrationed 

Anyone who wants to buy a pres- 
sure cooker for home canning this 
year may do so without bothering 
to apply for a certificate from the 
local ration board, the War Food 
Administration has announced. 
Pressure cookers were officially re- 
moved from rationing to the last 
week of the old year, but only for 
use in food preservation. 

Two sizes of pressure canners 
are on the market. The large size 
holds 14 glass quart jars, the small 
size 7 glass quart jars. 



OUTLOOK FOR LIVE 
IN 1944 



PREPARED UNDER THE! DIREC- 
TION OF THE CINCINNATI 
PRODUCERS, UNIONi STOCK 
YARDS. 



The year 1943 closes with the 

second largest food supply pro- 
duced in our nation's history. 



SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Deliver— Phone 74 



BURLINGTON, 









KENTUCKY 



FLOUR, Grocer's Pride 25 lb. bag $1.20 

CORN MEAL, White 10 lbs. 45c 

BEANS, Great Northern or Pinto lb. 10c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can, no points ". per can 12% c 

PEAS, Glenn Valley, 15 points per can 14c 

CORN, White Cream Style, 13 points .'. per can 12c 



MACKEREL, tall can, 16 points 

PEACHES, No. ZYi can, 27 points 

SALMON, Pink, tall can 

PRUNES 







COFFEE, Chase & Sanborn ...;..:..... 



per can 18c' 
per can 26c 

26c 

.per lb. 17c 

lb. 32c 

ORANGES per doz. 40c 

LEMONS per doz. 30c 

GRAPEFRUIT '....2 for 15c 

APPLES ... per lb. 10c 

SAUER KRAUT per lb. 10c 

FRANKS 7 .per lb. 32c 

NU-MAID MARGARINE per lb. 20c 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Rev. H. M. Hanter, Pastor 

Sunday, January 16, Bible School 
at 10 a. m. Mr. Woodford Crigler, 
Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
Holy Communion Service. Install- 
ation of officers. 

The Women's Missionary Society 
will hold their January meeting at 
the church on Wednesday,. Janu- 
ary 19, at 2:00 p. m. with Mrs. Em- 
mett Riddell leading the devotions. 

The Church Council will hold Its 
January business meeting at the 
church on Thursday, Jan. 20, at 
8:00 p. m. 



The 



Boone county Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE 
ESTATE OF J. H. CLORE, 
DECEASED 

e Administrator, De Bonis 
Non, of the estate of J. H. Clore, 
deceased, has filed his settlement 
in the Boone County Court and 
any person having exceptions to 
file to the settlement must do so 
on or before February 7, 1944 
(Next Regular Term of County 
Court). , 30-2t-c 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



| iTry A Want Ad— They Sell 



M 



I 



MAKING TflE MOST OF YOUR LIGHTING 










\. 


■■ 


■ 
j 













Shade Bare Bulbs 

Glare from bate bulbs wastes light by making the pupils 
of the eyes contract — like facing bright headlights at night. 
Bare bulbs are also wasteful where downward light is 
desired. Shades control and direct light for such purpose. 
Special shades and diffusing bowls are available at low 
cost for almost every type of lighting installation. We'll 
gladly help you select the proper equipment. 



Aa Efficient Glare Chaser 

I 

... is this plas^c screw-in adaptor 
unk. Easily installed, it screws 
into drop coeds or single-socket 
fixtures like a light bulb. Only 
$1.65, complete with 150-watt 
bulb, it provides abundant, glace- 
less light at low cost. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE CO. 




.-• * ? 



Make Every Payday Bond Day! 






During the year the largest num 
ber of hogs ever grown in this 
country were produced and the 
second largest number of cattle, 
sheep and lambs were marketed. 
All of this totals nearly twenty- 
five billion pounds of meat which 
has fairly well met the demands 
for our people at home, our Armed 
Forces ■ and Lend-Lease. This 
large meat supply and a record 
production of all other food was 
provided with less labor, short- 
ages of equipment and fertilizer 
but with favorable weather con- 
ditions which play a big part. 

The New Year faces i us with 
somewhat less numbers and fur- 
ther less tonnage in all species of 
livestock. It is reasonably estimat- 
ed by the Government that army 
purchases of meat will remain 
about the same as for the past 
year and that civilian use will 
likely be reduced about ten pounds 
per person. Livestock numbers are 
in excess of feed supplies. It is 
estimated that total animial feed 
is about 16%less than required 
to .feed out all livestock on hand 
for market. 

In the light of decreased pro- 
duction it seems apparent to the 
Producers Cooperative Association 
that the average consumption of 
meat will be reduced somewhere 
between ten and fifteen percent 
of our 1943 consumption. Even 
with this, however, with good dis- 
tribution the average individual 
will have nearly as much meat as 
the average number of years in 
the past. 

Cattle Outlook 
The Producers Cooperative Asso- 
ciation estimates that cattle pro- 
duction in the Cincinnati market 
area of Ohio,' Indiana and Ken- 
tucky will be some fifteen to 
twenty percent under the slaugh- 
ter of last year. Many cattle were 
sold this past summer, and fall be- 
cause of the uncertain situation 
resulting in the industry from 
Government regulations, further 
numbers were decreased because of 
the severe drouth situation, the 
high price of feed as well as be- 
ing unable to" secure concentrates, 
and in part too, the high price of 
replacement cattle early in the 
season. 

The average weight of most feed 
cattle has been considerably un- 
der similar classes in previous 
years. It Is estimated that the 
total number of cattle on feed in 
the feedlots are under-normal and 
the number of general cattle on 
farms is not more than seventy- 
five percent of normal in the Cin- 
cinnati area. 

Hog' Situation 
With hogs the uncertain situ- 
ation due to regulations, with 
much confusion resulting, the 
numbers will be somewhat less 
than of the previous year. How- 
ever, feeding conditions were ex- 
cellent, the quality above aver- 
age and the weight heavier than 
previous years. Opinions on hog 
production vary from ten to fif- 
teen percent less in 1944 than 1943 
production. 

Many brood sows were marketed 
during the fall months. The ma- 
jority of hog producers report cut- 
ting down the numbers of bred 
sows and gilts. 

The general hog situation looks 
like a more active market early 
this year and a need for all the 
hogs that will be available for 
slaughter during the year. Indi- 
cations point to full use of all hogs 
coming to the Cincinnati market. 
For two or three weeks in early 
December numbers exceeded de- 
mand. " Labor *ln packing plants 
not being available cut down kill- 
ing from to 20 to 30 percent of last 
year's volume. This is now im- 
proving and we believe that all 
future supplies will be readily car- 
ed for.; : 

Sheep and Lambs 
The most serious liquidation of 
any species of livestock comes with 
sheep and lambs. This started 
more than a year ago and contin- 
ued throughout 1943. The year. 
1943 proved to be one of the worst 
lamb producing years in our ex- 
perience; the quality of the lambs 
for the most part was very poor 
and returns to owners generally 
not satisfactory. This price situ- 
ation coupled with the drouth, and 
the dissatisfaction of OPA regula- 
tions not caring for seasonal vari- 
ations proved to bring about a 
heavier liquidation. It is estimat- 
ed that liquidation of breeding 
ewes by various sections amount 
from fifteen to twenty-five per- 
cent of last year's numbers. This 
means much fewer numbers of 
lambs to market the coming sum- 
mer and fall. 

The Cincinnati Producers Coop- 
erative Association continues to 
help livestock producers not only 
in their marketing operations but 
also in Hhe management and feed- 
ing of livestock, in the improve- 
ment of their livestock and in se- 
curing feeder stock and replace- 
ment animals. All of these services 
tend to aid in the total meat pro- 
duction so essential in the War 
Effort. . 

h 



BE^XEVIEW 

. P,yst., . Sidney B. Brown, of Nor- 
folk* Va., is home on furlough, 
visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
F. H. Brown and other relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Cason,, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ra^h Cason, Betty and 
Ivan, Mr. ai.d Mrs. Lillard Scott 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John 
E. Walton and daughter, Mrs> Allen 
Burcham and son were 'Sunday 
guests of Mr and Mrs. Carl Gries- 
ser and daiyhter v of Bond Hill, 
Cincinnati. . 

Mrs. Herman Smith, of Rising 
Sun, Ind., spent the week-end 
v/ith her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Willard Ryle, i 

Capt. Jas. Albert Clore, of Mays- 
ville, Ky., was visiting his brother 
and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Clore over the week-end. 

Mr. and Vrs. Stanley Stephens 
and children' moved to Burlington 
last week. We are sorry to lose 
these good leighbors from our 
midst. t 

Pvt. Melton Brown was visiting 
his brother and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Brown and daughter, 
Sunday. 

Due to anT illness, Mrs. Jocelyn 



■■ 



Rice has been ^unable to teach 
school the pant wqek. Mrs. Zora 
Scott filled th^|iracancy. 

Mr. and Mfisx. Jlarold Aylof, fit 
Cincinnati, were visiting Mrs. Altpe 
Aylor, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Rogers, S^., 
are ill at this writing. 

There will be a basketball gatijie 
at the Hebron high school gym 
Friday night, . January 14th, begin- 
ning at 7:30 CWT. The Hebron 
Cardinals will play the Burling 
ton Eagles. 



JANUARY SPECIALS 

3y 2 in. Glazed 

Flower P< ts 5c 

6 oz. China 

Coffee Mu % 6 for 25c 

Gray Enamel 

Wash Basins ...29fe 

21/2 Quart 

Gray Saucepans 25c 

32-Piece \& 

Breakfast Sets $2.95 

PAT'S CHINA STORE 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 



__ 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO 

rates. 

St. 



REPAIRS at 
COlonial 1121. 



t 



reasonable 
509 Scott 



FOR SALE — Fresh cow with sec- 
ond calf; also coming 1-year-old 
pony colt, saddle bred. Frank 
Kelly, Burlington, Ky. Phoke 

\ lt*-c 



Burl. 461. 



WANTED — 1300-pound work horse. 
Walter Eubanks, Crescent 
Springs:, Ky., Erlanger R P 4 l-tc 

NOTICE— I have a strayed buck 
sheep at my farm and would like 
for the owner to call me at once. 
M. G. Martin, Florence,' Ky. Tel. 
Flor. 17, lt-p 

— — 



FOR RENT— About 12 acres for 
corn and tobacco. Ernest Collins, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1, on North 
Bend Road. lt-p 



.FOR SALE— Large size wood and 
coal kitchen range with reserj- 
voir. Mrs. Geo. E. Coleman, 
Youell Pike, Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. lp 



WANTED— Man to. work on farm 
by month or day. J. c. Acree, Big 
Bone, Ky. lt-pd 



WISCONSIN DAIRY COWS^-40 
head of heavy-producing Hail- 
stein dairy cows just arrived for 
your inspection; all have been 'jr. 
B. and Bang's tested; all record 
cows with plenty of quality; al$o 
10 head of Guernseys and 5 head 
of Brown Swiss, to be sold for Mjr. 
Ray Hedwick of Wisconsin. Al$o 
30 head of horses and mules; 
week's trial given. All stock must 
be as represented or money re- 
funded; easy payments can be 
arranged; hog feed $1.65 per 100 
lbs. GENERAL DISTRIBUTOR^, 
30 E. Second St., Covington, Kyf 



PAINT VALUES! 
Enamel $1.98 

Quick-Dry gal. 

Varnish ...: $1.75 

All-Purpose gal. 

House Paint ,. 1.69 

gai. 

ROOF PAINT 1.59 

Red gal. 

Ttoof Coating 49c 

(In 5's) gal. 

Aluminum ■quart 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 



736 MADISON 



COVINGTON 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii 



FARMS FOR SALE 

10 A., close in, 3 room house, $1600 

44 A., good roa 1, house, barn, elec- 
tric, $3500. * 

45 A., near Dix'e, good bldgs., elec- 
tric. $7000. y 

60 A., house, barn, a cheap farm. 

$3000. w 

67 A., rich land, good buildings, 

electricity, $LJ,500. 
90 ACRES— Dudley pike, buildings; 

will sell in' 1 tracts. See sign 

near beacon tight. 
20 ACRES on pixie, new modern 

brick home, ii A-l condition, 

level land. <vj 
110 ACRES neat Florence, modern 

brick home, large dairy barn, 

fenced and watered, $12,500. 
40 ACRES on Dixie; new modern 

home, good- buildings, fenced; 

some woods. $10,500. 
150 ACRES nea. Dixie, good build- 
ings, dairy barn, level to rolling 

land, fenced, $15,000. 
240 ACRES ne^r Burlington, fair 

buildings, electric, all tractor 

land, a low p^ice at $70 per acre. 
100 ACRES v >ar Hebron; good 

buildings, feflfced. $9500. 
59 ACRES near Union; fair bldgs; 

rich land, 2 V 2 acres tobacco base; 

vacant; financed by Federal 

Loan for y 2 selling price. $5750. 
30 ACRES near Walton r buildings. 

$2000. 
65 ACRES npar Independence; 

buildings. $75j0. 

18 ACRES near Independence, no 
buildings; level. 

100 ACRES Taygar Mill; unimprov- 
ed. $5500. 

10 ACRES 5 mi'es out, 3 rm. house. 
$1600. , 

KENTON COU rTY SPECIAL— 57 
acres on blac top road one mile 
off Dixie, neA7-rm. house, barn 
and outbldgs? electric; 3-acre 
tobacco base; possession now. 
Price $7500. 

CAMPBELL COUNTY— The Lamb 
Dairy Farm, ftPt acres, 3 houses, 
2 barns. $20,(J0. 

80 ACRES good building; tractor 
land; camp on Licking River In 
woods. $7000. y 

20 ACRES, 3 miles out; stone house. 
$2000. 

19 ACRES — Concrete road; 7 room 
house, electrig $4500. 

IN BOONE CO,— 25 miles out; 10 

acres; old house and barn. $1200 
NEAR CARRO^LTON— 5% acres, 

rich level, X% a., tobacco base; 

8-rm. mod. heme, barn and out- 

bldgs. $8500. v 
NEAR WARSAW— 232 A., 2 houses, 

barn and outMdgs., $35 per acre. 

REL G. WAYMAN 

Office: 633 Washington St. 

Covington. k*hone HE. 5107 

Ind7 5064 



WANTED TO BUY Lespedeza hay. 
Call Mark Pleasant, HEmlocjk 
6530 after 6 p. m. It-te 



GUITARS — $15 up; Roy Acuff anjd 

other books. Strings and aceejf- 

.sories. Hanser Jewelry & Musi]:, 

515y 2 Madison, Covington. fUc 



FOR SALE— Three Angus bulls, or 
will loan; also 3 Angus cows and 
calves, 2 Hereford cows, 3 iJer- 
bred heifers, 5 milch cows, 10 
feeder cattle, 25 head of sheep; 
plenty of hogs. J. C. Acree, Bii 
Bone, Ky. it- 



WANTED— Tenant, to raise 6 to 10 
acres of tobacco; corn and other 
crops on shares. H. L. Kirby, 
Big Bone Church Road. Phone 
Flor. 957. 30-3t-pd 



FOR SALE— 4-Room house, furn- 
ace, running water, garage in 
basement; room for bath, with 
y 4 -acre lot. Call Burl. 686. Leon 
E. Ryle, located at McVille, Ky., 
near Dam 38. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE— 1934 Chevrolet Master 
sedan; tires and motor in good 
condition. Eldon Ryle, Burling- 
ton, Ky. I . lt-pd 



FOR SALE— One thoroughbred 200- 
lb. Hampshire boar. Ed Berkshire 
Burlington, Ky., R. 2. Tel. Burl. 
465-X. lt-c 



GET YOUR TOBACCO SEED AT 
CONNER'S LUNCH ROOM— JI 
*have Ky. 41A. This seed is th|e 
latest developed by the Experi- 
ment Station, highly resistant to 
root rot, quick grower, high yield- 
ing. Also No. 16 Root Rot Resist- 
ant. Both of these seeds are 
certified by the State. The o^d 
standby, Hamer's Golden Burle;jr. 
Come in, get the seed to produqe 
the kind of tobacco your ground 
requires. L. A. Conner, Burling- 
ton, Ky. 30-^f 



i 



BANTAM PULLETS AND HEN! 
WANTED — No roosters. Pleasje 
inform me by mail your price, 
and number you have to sell. C. 
W. Myers, Box 301, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 29-2t 



FOR SALE! — Baled hay, alfalfa, 
timothy and clover mixed; alsjo 
soybean and 5 ton of stra\jr. 
Floyd Campbell, Lawrencebur^;, 
Ind., R. 1. 29-3t-p 



WANTED TO RENT — Either cash 
or share, 50 acres or better. Can 
furnish my own team and tools. 
Harry V. Lorentz, Florence, K$r., 
R. i. 29-4t-cfy. 



WANTED — Housekeeper; must ble 
fond of children; reference re- 
quired; good salary to right peif- 
son.' Mary C. Grubbs, Waltoiji, 
Ky. Tel. Walton 352. 29,-^c 



FOR SALE — Thor electric washei[; 
living room sofa and chair witp 
springs; Jenny Lind bed. , May 
be seen at Mrs. John S. Ryle'p, 
at .Rabbit Hash. 29-4t 



TENANT— 130-acre farm in PerJ 
dleton County 6 miles north Qf 
Falmouth; all new buildings with 
electric; two acres of tobacc 
milk dairy; must have good re 
erence; good proposition wi 
right party. For further info;^ 
tion write Mr. E. R. Powers, 20114 
McCoy Ave., Covington, Ben 
tucky. 299-3t-i 



FOR SALE! — 2-horse riding turn 1 - 
ing plow; 6-month-old boar hog; 
1 red bull, beef type. Walter 
Eubanks, Crescent Springs, Ken 
tucky, Erlanger R 4 ttj 






FOR SALE — 50 shocks of fodde 
1 set double work harness; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 Oliver breaking plow. 
J. W. Berkshire, 111 S. Main' St., 
Walton, Ky. Telephone Walton 
543. 30-2t-p 



FOR SALE — Baled alfalfa hay. , 
J. Maddin, Walton, Ky. T; 
Walton 271. 30-2t-,c 



FOR SALE— 1929 Essex tudoi<; 
motor in good condition, with 5 
excellent tires. Winfield Waters, 
Limaburg, Ky. lt-4c 



FOR SALE; — Purebred blood tested 
barred rock pullets and roosterjfe. 
Price $1.50 each. Write or ca^l 
Flossie Campbell Martin, Hill- 
crest Farm, Phone 359. 30-2t-lc 



WANTED — Man to work on farm, 
to raise tobacco and work bjy 
day; everything furnished; $2.00 
per day. Dave Gaines, North' 
Bend Bottoms. 30-2t-ic| 



FOR SALE — Jersey cow, 6 yeai'S 
old, fresh with calf 3 weeks' old! 
T. B. and Bang tested. WiU 
Whife, Hebron, Ky. lt-i 



FOR SALE — Oak and black leath- 
er davinette; makes full size bed 
with mattress. Cheap. Ca!\l 
Dixie 7468-M after 7 p. m. or 83B 
Dixie Highway. lt-p<!l 



NOTICE— We have decided to con 
tinue our sawing business and 
will be open at all times; also 
good line of sleds for sale. W. A. 
Waters, Limaburg, Ky. 30-4 t-p 






LOST — Two fox hounds, one male 
and one female; white, black and 
tan; Ed Deaton and Jim Will- 
oughby names on collars. Lost 
in vicinity of Gunpowder. Noti- 
fy C. D. Benson, Burlington, 
Kentucky. lt-p 
*• . — 

FOR SALE — Duroc male hog, sub- 
ject to register, 9 months old; 
weigh 170 lbs. Call at Clyde 
Arnold's, Price Pike, Erlanger, 
Ky., R. 4. [ lt-p 

FOR SALE— Fresh cow with calf 
two weeks old. William G. Wahl, 
Tel. Hebron 172-X. 30-2t-c 



WANTED— Farm hand on poultry 
and fruit farm. Will furnish 
modern five-room house with 
electricity, furnace and running 
water; brooder house with stove; 
also room for 200 laying hens; 
stable and pasture for 4 or 5 
cows; garage and garden. Scott's 
Orchards and Vineyards, IVi 
miles from Bromley. lt-c 



FOR RENT — 40-Acre farm located 
4V 2 miles from Florence; con- 
crete block barn; plenty of wat- 
er; 65 apple trees; 900 ft. grape 
arbor. Share or money rent. Im- 
mediate possession. Apply Ben 
Anten, Florence, Ky. Tel. 21. 30-p 



WANTED TO BUY— Small farm, 
close in. Will pay cash. Must be 
worth the money asked. , C. M. 
Emral, Florence, Ky., R. 1. 29-3c 



FOR SALE— Alfalfa and timothy 
mixed hay; also ear corriT M. J. 
Millson, 15 Pike. St., Bromley, 
Ky. . - 29-2t-c. 



FOR SALE— Dix feed grinder; .3- 
horse riding plow; Delco light 
plant, batteries. Phone. Inde- 
pendence 6501. 29-2-p 



FOR SALE— 50 tons of straight 
timothy and 'timothy and clover 
mixed hay. Ralph Jones and 
Dave Gaines, TeL Flor 8103-J or 
Heb. 221. 29-4t-pd 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all legal 
damage claims, plus up to $500.00 
each to you and occupants of 
your car for injuries and med- 
ical services. Save cash. Phone 
Walter Gaines, Burl. 509; Joe 
Dringenburg, Flor. 860; Ryle 
Ewbank, Warsaw -2318. 26-4t-c 



£ET HELM help increase your 
" poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years contest 
winners; official world's records; 
government approved; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. oJuly31 



WANTED— Woman to work in 
kitchen and assist with cooking. 
Swan Restaurant. Tel. Dixie 
7555. 22-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. , tf. 



BE SAFE— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

LIVING ROOM SUITES 

DINET SETS $19 UP 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike St. Cov. G* 1750 



— _ 



1 



u 




fine i 

TEARING OR 
PAPBI 
PUBUC IiSRlfti 



**« Ky, s., 



Ail 






The Boone Couinty Recorder 




SERVB MID 



ESTABLISHED 1875 






^a. 



\t 




*»*»* 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY thebsday, January 20, 1944 



' 



VICTORY WASTE 
yPAPER CAMPAIGN 

Mess in county— everyone 
Purged to cooperate— 
chairmen ^named for vari- 
ous precincts. 




rs. Alan Gaines, chairman of 
waste paper campaign, urges 
sry community in Boone County 
^help in holding the line on the 
jer shortage. The paper short- 
age can be overcome by salvaging 
it on the home front, Mrs. Gaines 
seated. 

I Newspapers should be tied in 
I mdles about twelve inches thick, 
J :id all magazines, record books 
> ad old books should be tied in 
1, undies. Brown corrogated cartons 
lould be torn apart and flatten- 
Wrapping paper, all bags from 
lall ones to the large sizes used 
for cement, lime and fertilizer, shoe 
boxes, old posters, etc., are wanted. 
Wastebasket paper and envelopes 
re the best grade made. Leave 
i he paper sheets flat and stuff in 
' j 'artons. 

h'j It is the hope of the War Pro- 
fluction Board that all schools will 
Accept a quota of five pounds per 
46upil each week. The schools will 
4feceive the money from the sale 
'Cf the paper. 

The War Production Board' has 

guaranteed payment on all paper 

collected before the fifteenth of 

February. 

Dates for collection and collec- 

•, Jon mechanics have been set up 

yn many localities. Those whom 

f ju may call f^T further informa- 
on and who are acting as chair- 
Mien are as follows: Burlington, 
VM.rs. H. R. Forkner; Hebron, Mrs. 
Sue Rogers; Bullittsville, Mrs. Al- 
bert Willis; Constance, Mrs. Henry 
Kottmyer; Florence, Mrs. Harold 
Doner; New Haven, Mrs. Jake 
Cleek; Petersburg, Miss Gladys 
lopp; Rabbit Hash, Mrs. Orville 
telly; Taylorsport, Mrs. William 
Sprague; Verona, Mrs. Gilbert 
""Stewart; Walton, Mrs. Harry 
Mann; Walton (colored), Mrs. Alice 
Sleet. 

Collection dates are: Hebron, 
January 21; Walton, January 22; 
Verona, January 24; Petersburg, 
^January 20th. 



Hancock-McNeely 



Pi 



Miss Thelma L. Hancock became 



Mthe bride of Pfc. Lee R. McNeely, 
-'In a beautiful ring ceremony per- 
formed by Rev. Raymond Smith in 
[lihis home at 6110 Highland Ave., on 
yJanuary 15th. 

,K The bride is the attractive and 
ifpopular daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
^•'Emmett Hancock, of Indianapolis, 
Ind. She is a graduate of May- 
wood high school and now holds a 
position in that city. 
The groom is the only son of 
j ;Mr. and Mrs. Lee R. McNeely, of 
it (Burlington. He is a graduate of 
i'the Burlington high school in the 
Uclass of 1940 and was employed at 
^Wrights Aeronautical plant in 
4Lockland, prior to entering the 
jSArmy, May 11, 1943. He graduated 
yfrom the Army Mechanics School, 
Sheppard Field, Texas, January 5, 
and is now stationed at Goldsboro. 
N. C. He returned to his camp to- 
| (day- 

FARMERS URGED TO 
ILE APPLICATIONS 






FOR NEW 1944 BURLEY TOBACCO 
ALLOTMENTS NOT * LATER 
THAN FEBRUARY 1— REGULA- 
TIONS OUTLINED. 




Applications for new 1944 burley 
3acco allotments, must be filed 
at the Agricultural Conservation 
office not later than February 1st, 
.- 1944. New allotments are for those 
i persons who have never establish- 
ed a tobacco allotment on their 
j farm and no tobacco has ever been 
grown on the tract of land, on 
\jwhich the allotment is to be estab- 
j&lished. 

|| Information needed on* the ap- 
plication is the past five years of 
"jtobacco experience of the owner, 
cash tenant, or share tenant, the 
amount of crop land in the farm 
and the amount suitable for to- 
bacco. It is also required that the 
applicant live on the farm and ob- 
[ tain a substantial portion of his 
i income from the farm. 
\4 No allotment can be established 
unless either the owner, tenant, or 
[share cropper has had an interest 
in tobacco in the last five years, 
md can meet the requirements re- 
garding farm residence and income 
from the farm. 



Town Board Holds 

First Meeting Of Year 



I 



The^re-elected Board of Trustees 
of Florence held its first session of 
the n w year on Tuesday night, 
Janua y 11th. Mr. A. M. Yealey, 
was chosen as chairman, with Clif- 
ford. Coyle, vice chairman. Alfred 
Becker, R. G. Eades and Geo. R. 
Scott, members were present. Mr. 
Scott was chosen to fill the vac- 
ancy left by the removal of E. A 
Beall to Newark, N. J. 

The following committees were 
appointed : -.Light and water, Mr. 
Eades and Mr. Scott; street and 
cemetery, Mr. Coyle and Mr. Beck- 
er. 

The Police Judge, Harvey Baker 
has agreed to attend to the matter 
of notifying the Union Light, Heat 
and Power Co., when any street 
light is not burning. Anyone hav- 
ing knowledge of such a light, 
please notify Mr. Baker, telephone 
Florence 171. 



FORMER BOONE 
COUNTIAN DEAD 



Twelve Men Accepted 
At Induction Center 
Friday, January 14th 



ROY G. RUCKEL, FORMERLY OF 
HEBRON, REPORTED AS DEAD 
BY NAVY DEPARTMENT— HAD 
BEEN MISSING FOR YEAR. 






Twelve Boone County men were 
accepted for military service at the 
induction center, January 14, ac- 
cording to C. G. Kelly, Clerk of 
Local Draft Board No. 9, Burling- 
ton. 

Eleven of the twelve were placed 
in the U. S. Navy. They are John 



FARM LOAN ASS'N. 
HOLDS MEETING 



FINANCIAL REPORT SHOWS 
FTOrG CONDITION WITH RE- 
SERVE OF Sl^OO— ASSOCIA- 
TION S600,000.00 IN LOANS. 



Notification that their son Sea-| m hol ^ j ^ RusseU 

man Second Class Roy Glenn Reedf David Lewis Ta nner, William 
Ruckel, is now listed as dead after; miam Benjamin 



having been missing for more than <,„, . ' y^,^' Oo ^ 1( „ r-«,.oii T «« 



The annual meeting of the Boone 
County National Farm Loan Asso- 
ciation was held at the courthouse 
in Burlington, Tuesday of this 
week. E. A. Martin and William 
Hill were re-elected directors for a 
three-year term. Other hold-over 
directors were Thomas Hensley, 
Karl Rouse and A. G. McMullen. 

During the past year B. E. Aylor 
paid his loan and was no longer 
eligible to serve as a director. Ira 
M. Tanner sold his farm and not 
being eligible to serve as a directs 
or; A. G. McMullen was appointed 
to fill out Mr. Tanner's unexpired 
term of office, expiring in 1946, 
and the members voted to ap- 
prove this appointment. 

Following the meeting the direct^ 
ors held an organization meeting 
and elected E. A. Martin, presi- 
dent; Thomas Hensley, vice presi- 
dent, and A. B. Renaker. secretary 
treasurer. E. A. Martin was ap- 
pointed by the board as Investigat- 
or for the Loan Committee. The 
loan committee is composed of E. 
A. Martin, Thomas Hensley and A. 
G. McMullen. Alternate members 
are Karl Rouse and William Hill. 

The financial report of the asso- 
ciation showed a strong, healthy 
condition with over $12,400.00 re- 
serve to take care of any losses, 
should any occur. 

The officers do not know of any 
possible loss on any loan on the 
books and but five recent delin- 
quencies, which will be paid in this 
month from tobacco sales. 

Over $100,000.00 Federal Land 
Bank and Commissioner loans have 
been paid during the past year. 

S. Beverly Davis and Mr. Wade 
from the Federal Land Bank were 
present and explained a plan for 
consolidating this association with 
the associations of Kenton, Camp- 
bell, Grant and Owen counties, 
with a central office to be located 
at Williamstown. The members 
unanimously voted against such a 
a proposal. 

Judge John L. Vest was present 
and made a talk advising that he 
did not think a consolidation would 
be any benefit to the Boone Coun- 
ty Association. 

The association has over $600,000 
loans on its book as of December 
31, 1943. 






J. Frank Denny 



Funeral services for J. Frank 
Denny, 71, who died Sunday Ut his 
home, Lytle Avenue, Elsmere, aft- 
er an illness of several days, were 
held Tuesday by the Taliaferro fu- 
neral home, Erlanger. Mr. Denny 
was a member of the Christian 
Church, Richmond, «Ky. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Annie Denny; two daughters, Mrs; 
Bertha Isaacs and Miss Lula Den- 
ny; two sons, Pvt. Davis Denny, 
stationed at Santa Ana Army Air 
Base, California, and Charles 
Denny, Elsmere; two brothers, five 
grandchildren and two great- 
grandchildren. 



Daniel McGuirk 

Requiem High Mass was sung at 
9 a„ m. Friday at St. 'Henry Church 
Erlanger, following prayers at 8:30 
a. m. at the Philip Taliaferro 
funeral home, Erlanger, for Daniel 
McGuirk, 74, of 19 Center Street, 
Erlanger, who died Wednesday at 
St. Elizabeth Hospital after a short 
illness. Burial was in St. Mary 
Cemetery. 



Department by the parents, Mr 
and Mrs. Ernest Ruckel, 311 West 
Market St., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Two letters, one from Secretary 
Frank Knox and the other from 
Commander A. C. Jacobs, head of 
the Casualties and Allotments sec- 
tions, were received by Mr. and 
Mrs. Ruckel. 

The young sailor, who was 19 
years old at the time of his en- 
listment on Aug. 8, 1942, had been 
missing since Dec. 13, 1942, accord- 
ing to the letters received. 

He was a member of the armed 
guard crew of a merchant vessel 
which disappeared without a trace 
on that date. According to the 
message from Comm. Jacobs, no 
distress signals from the ship were 
heard; no wreckage was found and 
no member of the crew was ever 
heard from. 

It is presumed that the ship was 
sunk by an enemy submarine off 
the east coast of the United States 
as the last message the parents re- 
ceived from him was a letter sent 
from Brooklyn, N. Y., and which 
was dated Dec. 5, 1942. 

The original notification that 
the sailor was missing was deceived 
by the parents on Jan. 15, 1943, Just 
a year ago. 

Sec. Knox, in his message to the 
parents, said: "I extend to you my 
sincere sympathy in your great be- 
reavement and hope you can find 
comfort in ' the knowledge that 
your son gave his life for his coun- 
try. The Navy shares in your sense 
of bereavement and feels the loss 
of his service." 

Ruckel was a former resident of 
the Hebron community. 



Walton Home Damaged * 
By Fire Thursday 

Fire damaged the home of Hob- 
art Beach, on' High School Court, 
last Thursday, with loss estimated 
at $500, according to reports/ 

Mrs. Beach, his wife, ill at the 
time, was on the second floor of 
the home and did not •■ know that 
the living room floor had been 
ignited by sparks from an open 
fireplace. 

Neighbors discovering the fire, 
summoned the Walton Fire De- 
partment which soon brought the 
blaze under control. It was un- 
necessary to remove Mrs. Beach 
from the residence. 



Eugene Mahorney, William Blan- 
ton Hornsby, John Samuel Scud- 
der. William Frank Beil entered 
the U. S. Army. [. 

Men entering the Navy will re- 
port Friday for active duty, while 
those entering the Army are allow- 
ed 21 days prior to reporting for 
duty 



Farmers Plan To 

Attend Farm And 

Home Convention 



A number of Boone County 
farmers have made plans to at- 
tend the Annual Farm and Home 
Convention at the College of Agri- 
culture at Lexington, January 25- 
28th. 

The Wednesday and Thursday 
meetings are expected to attract 
largest attendance from the coun- 
ty. The Wednesday meeting will 
be devoted to the 1944 farm out- 
look and to national farm 'prob- 
lems. The Thursday meeting 
will include » wide variety of 
special meetings on farm produc- 
tion problems includings, soils, 
crops, dairy, poultry, veterinary 
and horticulture and the rural 
church. The Friday meeting will 
be devoted to soils, livestock and 
dairying. 

Plans are being made to aid all 
local people possible in their plans 
of travel to and '»fram the meet- 
ings. ' Those who do not have a 
way to go or those who are going 
and have extra room in their cars 
are urged to notify the County 
Agent's office. 



Thomas W. Dwyer 



Thomas William Dwyer a retir- 
ed fanner, died Monday at his res- 
idence in Verona, after a short ill- 
ness. He was 70 years old. 

Mr. Dwyer is survived by his wi- 
dow, Mrs. Susie Dwyer; a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Porter Stephenson. Cov- 
ington; a brother, Ben Dwyer, of 
Hume, HI.; five sisters, Mrs. Law- 
rence Ryan, Walton; Mrs. Kate 
Ryan, Verona; Mrs. Thomas Ma- 
loney, Cincinnati; Mrs. Edward 
Roberts, Paris, 111., and Mrs. Martin 
Ryan, Louisville, and one grand- 
child. 

Funeral services were held at 3 
p. m. Wednesday at the Hamilton 
funeral home, Verona, followed by 
burial in New Bethel Cemetery. 



Robert Sorrell 



Robert Sorrell, 80 years of age 
died Wednesday at his home 20 
May Street, Elsmere, following sev- 
eral months' illness. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Rilla Sorrell, a sister, step-sister, 
step-son and three grandchildren. 



er funeral director. 



William Sutherland 

William H. Sutherland, 82 pass- 
ed away Wednesday of last week 
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
Martin Siron, 900 Dixie Highway, 
Erlanger, after a brief illness. 

Besides his daughter with whom 
he was living he leaves two other 
daughters, two half brothers, a half 
sister, eight grandchildren and 
four great-grandchildren. 

Philip Taliaferro, Erlanger fu- 
•neral director was in charge of 
arrangements. 



Hebron Homemakers 

Sponsor Paper V • 

Salvage Drive 



The Hebron Homemakers are 
sponsoring a paper salvage drive 
this week ending Friday, Jan. 21. 
The 4-H club boys and girls are 
assisting us in the drive. Everyone 
having any waste paper please 
take it to the school house before 
Friday. If you have no way to 
transport your paper please notify 
Mrs. Edward Peel and we will; try 
to get the paper. 

All money received from the 
sales of paper will be paid on the 
new fair grounds. 

Let's all get behind this drive — 
the government needs the paper. 



FARMERS PLAN 
BETTER PROGRAM 






I ' ! 



FOR '44 ACCORDING TO COUNTY 
AGENT— IMPROVED METHODS 
WELL GREATLY ADD IN IN- 
CREASED PRODUCTION. 



1 



Funeral arrangements were in 
charge of Philip Taliaferro, Erlang-fbrid seed corn, more" economical 



Leading farmers meeting in com- 
munity meetings are planning to 
carry out better production prac- 
tices in 1944, according to H. i R. 
Forkner, County Agent. Meetings 
the past week were held in Hebron, 
Verona, Hamilton and Grant com- 
munities. Meetings during the 
next ten days will be held in Flor- 
ence, Walton, New Haven, Peters- 
burg, Constance and Burlington 
communities. 

Better farm ■ practices planned 
for 1944 todate include greater use 
of cover crop and permanent pas- 
tures, improved quality of hay 
crops, use of higher yielding hy- 



f eeding of dairy cows, parasite con 
- trol in sheep, adjustment of hog 
and poultry numbers and healthy 
stock production, heavy uses ( of 
fertilizers to reach a goal of a ton 
of tobacco per acre, improved 
truck crops production and a more 
complete home food production 
program and the greater uses of 
farm labor saving equipment. 

Farmers are faced with stren- 
uous production problems in 1944. 
The careful study of these prob- 
lems at this time is considered by 
the leaders as most important. All 
farmers are invited to attend the 
meetings held in their communi- 
ties. 



LOCAL DELEGATES 
ARE SELECTED 

FOR FARM AN1 I HOME WEEK AT 
LEXINGTON VjANUARY 25-28— 
CONVENTION WELL START AT 
9:30 A. M. TUESDAY. 



The Boone County Homemakers 
Advisory Counci selected Mrs. Al- 
bert Willis and'Odrs. Albert Pfalz- 
graf, as voting delegates to meet- 
ings of the Kentucky Federation of 
Homemakers hel^ during Farm and 
Home Week. 

Several local homemakers' clubs 
are planning tc send representa- 
tives to the program January 25 
through January 28th held at 
Memorial Hall ..n the campus of 
University of K< ltucky, Lexington. 
Others are planning to attend one 
or two days' program. Anyone 
from Boone Cojnty attending is 
asked to register In the lobby of 
Memorial Hall, so the University 
may have a com jlete record of at- 
tendance. 

The conventio: will start at 9:30 
a. m. Tuesday January 25th. 
Speakers for Tuesday include Dr. 
H. L. Donovan, p&sident University 
of Kentucky; Miss Florence Hall, 
chief Women's Land Army Divi- 
sion; Roy Henfrickson, director 
Food Distribution Administration, 
Washington; an J Dr. Faith Wil- 
liams, U. S. Deptf^of Labor. 

Highlights of Wednesday's pro- 
gram includes ta'ks by people fam- 
iliar with habits^of other counties, 
among the speakers are: Mr, A, H. 
Tandy, British Consul, Cincinnati; 
Miss Else Roed.^toyal Norwegian 
Information Service; Mrs. Chu 
Shih-Ming and Miss Flora Dodson 
returned mission 4ry. Dean Thom- 
as Cooper will be" the first speaker 
for Thursday. Others talks will be 
made by Miss Gertrude Dieken, 
Home Economic^ Consultant, Du- 
Pont Company; and Rev. A. W. 
Fortune, Lexington. The annual 
business meeting )f Kentucky Fed- 
eration of Homemakers will be held 
on Friday with t^e annual lunch- 
eon held in the ^illroom of Phoe- 
nix Hotel. 

Anyone desiring information on 
the program or jransportation to 
Farm & Home Week are urged to 
contact Miss Mary Hood Gillaspie, 
Home Demonstration Agent, Bur- 
lington 412. r 



Hebron Defea 







r>V 



30* 




ington Fri. 



Hebron turned back the Burling- 
ton hoopsters Friday night on the 
home floor by a score of 40 to 20. 
Hebron led all the way with a 21 to 
12 advantage at the halfway 
mark. 

In a preliminary game the Heb- 
ron reserves down the Burlington 
second string men 32-2. 

The Hebron Independent team 
defeated the Burlington five by a 
score of 42 to 30. 

Walton will meet Burlington on 
the local floor Friday night of this 
week. 

St. Henry high school hit the 
scqring packet Friday night when 
the team trounced New Haven 
52-21 at the New Haven gym. In 
a preliminary game St. Henry's re- 
serves won over New Haven 22-12. 

New Haven took an early lead in 
the first five minutes of play hold- 
ing a five-point lead, but the score 
was tied at the quarter 7-7. Fuss- 
ing, star for St. Henry hit the hoop 
for 18 points in the last half, total- 
ing 25 for the entire game. 






INJURIES SUFFERED 
IN ACCIDENT M0N. 



CAR OF FLORENCE MAN SKIDS 
ON ICE, PLUNGES OVER EM- 
BANKMENT—FLORENCE TRIO 
TREATED AT HOSPITAL. 



Delegates Attend 

Fanrivureau 

Convention Fri. 



Lloyd Siekman, Harold Crigler 
Boone County Fjrm Bureau dele- 
gates and H. F Forkner, coun- 
ty agent attende the State Farm 
Bureau Convenitta at Louisville on 
last Wednesday,^/ Thursday, and 
Friday of last week. 

The delegates report the best 
Farm Bureau convention on rec- 
ord with more than 800 delegates 
attending. Alex ^alvert of Mason 
county was re-elected president 
and J. E. Stanford, secretary of 
the State Federa^on. The national 
goal for 1944 is 1,000,000 farm fam- 
ily memberships. , 
w 

The county delegates expressed 

confidence that tie county goal of 
100 members would be exceeded 
this year. 



Clyde Sheriff 



L 






% Mate Third CI ss Clyde Sheriff, 
33, was killed in j boat accident, 60 
miles off Cape/yMay, N. -J., last 
Thursday when |$Navy patrol boat 
of which he wafei a crew member 
was rammed by^a merchant ship 
and sank. The body was recovered 
by the Coast Guard. . 

Mate Sheriff 1 aves his widow, 
Mrs. Ruth Sherij ; two sons Clyde 
and Robert; a d£ jghter Jacqueline 
his mother, Mrsf Katherine Sher- 
iff, Erlanger; nils father Everett 
Sheriff, Covington; two sisters, 
Mrs. I. L. Lewis, and Miss Fanna 
Rae Sheriff, and one brother, 
Charles Sheriff. - 

Funeral arrangements were in 
charge of Philip Taliaferro, Er- 
langer funeral director. 



Crop Sells For Average ^__ 
Of $55.00 Per CWT. 

W. E. Sullivf n and Richard 
Koons told thei* crop of tobacco, 
grown on the farm of Mr. Sullivan, 
Middle Creek, consisting of 4284 
pounds for $23104, an average 
for the entire croo of approximate- 
ly $55.00 per 100 .pounds. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Jarrell 
and daughter of .Walton, called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Maurer and 
and daughter, la t Thursday even- 
ing. v 



Albert Riley, Lucjjle Worthington 
and Jo Worthington all of Florence 
suffered injuries Monday morning 
when their auto skidded on the 
Dixie Highway, near St. James Ave. 
in Kenton county, and -plunged 
over an embankment for a 20-foot 
drop. 

Albert Riley, the driver said the 
car began to skid on the slippery 
highway and that as he applied his 
brakes the auto swerved over the 
embankment on the left side of 
the road. The auto was badly dam- 
aged. 

County patrolmen removed the 
trio to St. Elizabeth Hospital for 
treatment. Riley suffered cuts over 
the left eye. The Worthington 
girls suffered cuts on the legs: 
They were released after treatment. 

Mr. Riley and his two passengers 
were enroute to work when the 
accident occurred about 8:00 a. m 



Good Attendance 

At Council Meeting 



The advisory council of Boone 
County Homemaker clubs met in 
Burlington, Tuesday, January 11. 
County President, Mrs. Leo Flynn 
called the meeting to order, and 
gave an interesting review on the 
origin of our club collect, and a 
short sketch of its author. Mrs. 
Flynn advised all Homemaker club's 
to use it and the pledge to the flag 
in their regular meetings. Minutes 
of last year's meeting were read 
and approved. Treasurer's report 
given and accepted. County chair- 
men responded to roll call . with 
good reports on accomplished 
work, arid excellent ideas for fur- 
ther advancement in club work. 

Mrs. Alan Gaines was asked to 
introduce to gentleman represent- 
ative of the War Production Board. 
He discussed the urgent need of 
paper by our government, and was 
here to interest Boone County folk 
in the waste paper drive being 
staged in our two neighboring 
counties. Mrs. Alan Gaines was 
named county chairman for the 
drive. Mrs. Gaines asked each local 
club president Sfnd citizenship 
chairman serve on paper salvage 
committees. ~ 

• Miss Lula Logan, assistant state 
leader of Home Demonstration 
Agents discussed the State Farm 
and Home meeting at Lexington on 
January 25-28 inc. Two county 
delegates were appointed, and Miss 
Logan hoped each club would send 
a delegate. 

Miss Mary Hood Gillaspie dis- 
cussed some important amend- 
ments to the Federation Constitu- 
tion to be dealt with at the State 
meeting. 



Clipping Received From 

Local Boy In England 

George Powers, formerly of Ver- 
ona, now stationed with the U. S. 
Army in England sent the following 
clipping concerning the trial of 
Joan Kiger, and taken from a 
paper in England: 

iBurlington, (Kentucky)— Wed- 



shot her father and brother in a 
nightmare, was acquitted of a 
charge of murder here to-day. Her 
mother was also acquitted on a 
similar charge by the Jury of 12 
farmers.— B.UP." 



CHAIRMEN HOLD 



BOND MEETING 

— 



WAYS AND MEANS DISCUSSED 
FOR RAISING BOONE COUN- 
TY'S QUOTA— MORE INTEREST 
URGED BY LEADERS. 



— 






A meeting of precinct chairmen 
of the War Finance Committee in 
connection with the Fourth War 
Loan Drive was- held at the court 
house last Thursday night. Only 
eight of the twelve chairmen re- 
sponded to the call for this meet- 
ing. Those present discussed ways 
and, means for raising Boone 
County's quota of $500,000,00 and 
it was felt that more interest must 
be given toward the war effort by 
everyone in these drives. This 
country is practically the only 
country in the war that has not 
suffered from bombs being drop- 
ped on our homes and which has 
not suffered by women and chil- 
dren being wounded, torn and 
bleeding. 

The high prices' for tobacco now 
being marketed and the high wages 
being paid the factory worker is 
because of those young soldiers 
bleeding and dying on the battle 
fields of foreign countries. Can 
you look a soldier in the face when 
he returns knowing that you have 
been spared hardships of war and 
been -permitted to remain at home 
making money while he was? suf- 
fering the torments of Hell for you 
without knowing that you have 
gone the limit in purchasing War 
Bonds in this Fourth War Loan 
Bond Drive now in progress. 

Wake up Boone County citizens, 
there is a war going on! Get be- 
hind this Fourth War Bond Drive. 
Don't purchase si small bond and 
think you have pone tyour duty— 
you have only done youi duty when 
you buy to your very limit. 

Go to your bank at once and 
make your subscription. The 
coupon bond purchased before 
February 1st will not carry any 
accrued interest to be paid. After 
that date you must pay accrued 
interest. It is to your interest to 
subscribe before February 1st, 
however, the drive does not close, 
until February 15th. 

Let's have a good report for our 
County papers next week. 

A. D. Yelton is again serving as 
Co-Chairman with Mr. Renaker, 
and has charge of publicity and 
other details of the drive. 

Due to a typographical error in 
last week's bond article we are re- 
printing a list of bonds being of- 
fered. The list follows: In addition 
to the usual Series E, F, and G 
bonds, the Treasury offers a 2 J A 
percent bond dated February 1st, 
due in 1959 but callable in 1956; a 
2y 2 percent bond dated February 
1st, due 1970 but callable in 1965; a 
7-8 percent Certificate of Indebt- 
edness dated February 1st, due in 
one year; and Treasury Savings 
notes, Series C, due in 3 years, to 
yield 1.07 percent if held to ma- 
turity, or may be used for tax pur- 
poses. 



Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ryle and fam- 
ily and Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin 
and daughter were dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Earl 
Easton and family, one night last 
week. 

BURLEY AVERAGE 
SHOWS INCREASE 






OVER PREVIOUS WEEKS, AC- 
CORDrNG TO STATE DEPART- 
MENT OF AGRICULTURE- 
MONDAY AVERAGE $48.23. 



Burley tobacco prices averages 
advances on most Kentucky mar- 
kets Monday with a high of $48.23 
a hundredweight, top price for sev- 
eral weeks, recorded at Horse Cave, 
the State Department of Agricul- 
ture reported. 

Sales totaled 11,409,036 pounds 
for an average of $45.08, the state 
department reported, despite a War 
Food Administration statement 
that fair quality offerings were 
supplanting the quantity of good 
to choice grades. 

Growers received $5,153,580.56 for 
their crops. 

Carrollton sold 897,702 pounds for 
a total of $415,604.51, an average 
of $46.30. Covington sold 229,294 
pounds for $104,766.23, an average 
of $45.69. . Cynthiana sold 578,884 



nesday. — Jo Annkiger, the 16-year- 
old schoolgirl who told how she had pounds Pit $267,54151, an average 



of $4851. Lexington sold 2,788,536 
pounds for $1,299,921.74, an average 
of $46.62. 

High basket on the Covington 
market Monday was $60 and low 
basket $9. 



1 



>Vi 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






■*■ 



i 



BDflHE CflUNTY REEflREiER 



A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 
RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 



^ Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 



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SOLDIERS WILL GET THE 
BALLOT 

There has been a lot of discus- 
sion about the so-called soldier 
vote bill before Congress, the ques- 
tion being whether the Federal 
Government or the States should 
take charge of the program and 
arrange all the details. 

The dispute has been enlivened 
by news from the battlefronts, all 
to the-effect that men in the ser- 
vice expect to cast their ballots in 
the next Presidential election. 
Really,' it doesn't make much dif- 
ference whether the Federal Gov- 
ernment or the States carry out 
the details. But, there seem to be 
distinct limitations on the amount 
of mailing matter that can be sup- 
plied to the men in the field and 
on the ships. 

Apparently the responsibility 
rests upon Congress, and as the air 
clears of arguments and contro- 
versy it begins to look as though the 
practical way is for the Govern- 
ment to conduct the election. If 
the States can help, well and good. 

The obligation rests upon the 
Home Front to supply the battle 
fronts with ballots as well as bul- 
lets. Methods and means to do it, 
will be worked out. That seems to 
be a settled fact. 



A NATURAL REACTION 

OPA officials in New York City 
should be nearly convinced that 
housewives have no desire to play 
detective. In reply to four thous- 
and personal letters in quejst of 
price checkers, the Manhattan War 
Price and Rationing Board man- 
aged to secure eleven women vol- 
unteers. Eleven out of four thous- 
and iS a pretty poor batting aver- 
age. According to the OPA, a New 
York housewife simply does not 
want to be a "policewoman." 

Housewives have always had 
their* own way of dealing with 
merchants who seek to exploit con- 
sumers. Their methods are effec- 
tive. They just quit patronizing 
stores that arouse their ire. As a 
result, this country has perhaps 
the most efficient retail distribu- 
tion system in the world. House- 
wives are satisfied that it is treat- 
ing them fairly, and that retailers 
on the whole are doing the best job 
they can under difficult circum- 
stances. Therefore, why make 
their task harder? 

POWER TO DESTROY 

Federal income taxes have in- 
creased 700 percent since Pearl 
Harbor, says Paul Mallon, with the 
brunt of the burden falling on al- 
ready overtaxed sources of rev- 
enue. Taxes have now reached the 
point where it is ho longer likely 
that extensive new industries will 
develop from accumulated savings. 
Neither the money nor thje incen- 
tive is left for such purposes after 
the tax bills, are paid. 

The gravity of the tax situation 
brings the American people face to 
face with a serious choice. As 
Harley L. Lutz, eminent authority 
on tax matters, observes: "Con- 
cretely and in terms of an historic- 
al parallel, it is the choice between 
the Ford fortune and the Ford 
automobile. If they (the people) 
should decide that there shall be 



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I 



f I 




PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 






COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

fATJ 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 



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F. W. Kassebaum & Son, Inc. 

Authorized Dealers = 

'Rock of Age*" Barre Granite 

« 1 MONUMENTS | 

Aurora, Indiana = 

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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 



{ : 



I LUDLOW, 









Ambulance Service 
V 

Phone COlonial 2580 



KENTUCKY | 



=lit i it 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 mil f i Jffrr/t 

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g THE TEST OF TIME .. . 

55 After more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 

sa we can safely say that our organization has stood this stern- 

5E est and most exacting of all trials. 



I Chambers & Grubbs I 



5= FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



WALTON 352 5 



ilillllllililllllilillllliiilllllllllin 



no more, fortunes, they will also 
thereby decide that there shall be 
no commodities of mass comfort 
and enjoyment other than those 
now known. A few large fortunes 
would appear to be a small price to 
pay to gain the full benefit for all 
of the creative and productive 
capacity which can be stimulated 
most effectively and most certainly 
by allowing those who succeed to 
keep the fruits of their success." 

Fifteen state legislatures have 
resolved for a constitutional 
amendment limiting Federal In- 
come taxes in peacetime to 25 per 
cent. The instinct of self preser- 
vation should stimulate other states 
to similar action. Unrestricted 
Federal taxing power in the hands 
of a strong central government has 
become a menace to the sovereign- 
ty of the states, as well as to the 
freedom of the individual. 

COLLEGE PUBLISHES 

HOME FOOD LEAFLETS 

"If you grow your own food you 

can have all you want of what you 
need for health and vigor, at small 
cost." So declare specialists at the 
Kentucky College of Agriculture 
and Home Economics in a leaflet 
called "Grow Your Own Food." 

Another leaflet of interest just 
at this time is called "Your Vege- 
table Garden," It tells what to 
plant, how to plant it, and how to 
take care of it. 

Still a third leaflet of interest 
just at this time is, "Keep Chick- 
ens and Eggs for Home Use." It 
tells how to have a small flock 
that will supply all the eggs a 
family can use. 

' These leaflets may be had free 
ot charge at offices of county 
agents or home demonstration 
agents or by writing to the col 
lege at Lexington. 



£31 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

VALLEY 0887 

We pay 'phone charges 

Kentucky Dead Animal 
Disposal Co. 

LOCKLAND, -:- OHIO 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 




6*6 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




QUicki 



All leading breeds D. S. 
Approved. Blood-tested, started chicks one, two and 
three weeks old. Prices right. 'Also Sexed chicks. 
FREECATALOG.Write: KENTUCKY HATCHERY 

827 WEST FOURTH STREET • LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:0 0a. m. ( CWT ) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 

and fourth Sunday. 



BULLI TTSBU RG BAPTIST 

CHURCH 
• Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 

Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:15 p. m. for Juniors. 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship at 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 

BRETHREN 

Orion Erbangh, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each ■ Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:60. 

You need your church. 



\ 



Go To Church 



BELLEYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. '"■ Guth, Pastor 

Sunder School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. I.ogers, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone is cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



EAST BEND METHODIST 

CHUDCH 

Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and. third 

Sunday evening at 7 p. m.; also 

every fifth Sunday morning and 

evening. 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Robt. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 %. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 

Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 

Church 12:0i E W. T. 

Evening services 8 p.m. E. W. T. 

FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. . 

Evening Worship 8 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even- 
ing 8 p. m. 

You are invited to come— wor- 
ship an ' work with us: 

RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedlnger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. . Harry 
Jarbo, Supt. • , 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 



Sunday School io:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, Supt. 
MOrning Worship 11 a. m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.) 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT 
Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. CWT 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 

at 7:30 CWT. 
Services held each Sunday. The 

public is cordially invited. 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 19 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 

FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 

Rev. Elmer Kidwell. Pastor 

S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 

Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p* m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Alrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. \ 

Evening Worship 8:90' pL m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pastor 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m, EWT. 

P rayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. • 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. 

Preaching first and third Sun- 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:3Q p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed S'linWe. Supt 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. 

Evening Service at '.:?i (C.W.T.) 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p. in, 



s»^» % »»»»>» , 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 



S 



UNDAYl 

chool Lesson 



By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 

Of The Moody Bible Institute ot Chicago. 

Released by Westerr Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for January 23 



Lesson subjects an> Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyriphsM by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. . 



JESUS TEACHES IN PARABLES 

LESSON TEXT— MlnVk 4:1-8, 26-32. 
GOLDEN TEXT— If any man hath ears 
to hear, let him hear.— Mark 4:23. 

Parables were often used by our 
Lord, particularly when He had 
truth to reveal w"iich was not for 
unbelieving heart that -had hard- 
ened themselves ^ against it <see 
Matt. 13:10-16). , 

The method is *hat of telling an 
earthly story, true to life (hence, not 
a fable), which is placed alongside 
of the spiritual tr ;h it is designed 
to teach. It thus differs from an 
allegory, which giies the meaning 
with the story (sat John 15:1-6). 

Jesus used paraHes in our lesson 
to teach the truth that the good seed 
of the Word of God will be received 
in varioiVways and will bring forth 
widely differing results. He — the 
Lord— was the Sower, and the field 
was the world (ItfBtt. 13:37, 38). 

We note first that in that field 
there were and are — 

I. Four Kinds of Soil (Mark 
4:1-9). 

The reception ot the seed is de- 
termined by the condition of the soil. 
The great field was essentially of one 
kind of soil, but it had become wide- 
ly different in its bility to take in 
the seed and bear ruit. 

The interpretation of this parable 
is given by our Lord in the verses 
immediately following (w. 3-20). It 
has striking application to our day. 

A road, or beatei pathway, was a 
common thing in ti«e fields of Pales- 
tine. On such hard soil a seed found 
no place to grow, and the birds car- 
ried it away. Such is the condition 
of a man who pemits the heavy 
and sinful traffic «f this world to 
harden his heart against spiritual 
truth. If our heart has reached that 
stage we should ask God to break 
it up. The birds (always a symbol 
of evil in the Bible are Satan and 
his emissaries. T^ey are always 
busy about carrying away the Word 
of God when it is truly preached. 

The rocky soil was a thin layer of 
good soil on a rock ' ledge. At first 
this caused rapid j rowth, but with- 
out deep roots it < )uld not survive 
the heat of summe: This is the one 
who enthusiasticall responds to the 
gospel appeal, but l^ing without real 
conviction and repentance, he has 
no stability when persecution comes. 

The thorny gdjjjind — where the 
growing grain was choked by weeds 
— typifies the professed believer who 
lives in worldliness. The friend of 
the world is God's enemy (James 
4:4). Note the thins which destroy 
spiritual life (v. 19 jf and shun them. 
In the good ground— open to receive 
and ready to yiey itself for the 
growth of the seed— there is abun- 
dant harvest. Even here there is a 
difference in the imount of fruit. 
Why not be a "•jundredfold" be- 
liever? • 

Changing the picture a little our 
Lord now speaks ofV 

II. Normal Growth and a Good 
Harvest (4:26-29). 

This parable, foutrd only in Mark, 
has a lesson for the sower. He is 
not to expect the arvest immedi- 
ately after the time^pf sowing. There 
is a period of patient waiting while 
God is producing ■ ■ le growth (and 
only He can do it!)S-then the joy of 
harvest. 

Thftre are many ?ssons to learn 
here. We who seethe the Lord in 
teaching or preaching the Word are 
too impatient, too » ager to be able 
to announce results? God is always 
willing that things should mature 
naturally and in die season. Let 
us wait for Him a^d be at rest in 
our spirits (v. 27). 

Then let us be glad as the seed 
begins to show sig-is of maturing, 
but let us not be r slow to gather 
the harvest when it^is ready. Some 
forget to gather the spiritual fruit 
of their labors, pos ( ibly having long 
since lost patience fend interest. 

We should also be encouraged by 

.this parable to con inue sowing the 

seed, knowing that It will find place 

in the hearts of some and bring forth 

fruit unto eternal I' 'e. 

Next we are wanted to be on our 
guard against accepting or approv- 
ing— 

III. Abnormal Gi'wth and an Evil 
Harvest (4:30-32). 

The mustard is an herb, not a 
tree ; hence this pa; able gave warn- 
ing that there wo' Id be an over- 
grown religious sya. em calling itself 
Christian. The bir^s are (as in the 
parable of the khjps of soil) evil 






. o I 



men, or "ismSi 



birts are 
kinks of 
" Ir ori 



organizations 



eager to take shelter in a religious 
system without spiritual power. 

The church had $ ch an abnormal 
growth when Cons^antine espoused 
Christianity as a political move, 
mixed it with paganism, and ele- 
vated it to a position of worldly 
power. 

All this was and still is contrary 
to God's plan for *be church. He 
wanted a spiritual b^dy distinguished 
by lowliness, meekness and "service. 
These are the things that mark the 
true Christian spiri*. The marks of 
true Christianity e e always those 
of likeness to Him^Wio said: "I am 
meek and lowly in heart," who came 
"not to be ministered unto but to 
minister." 



BULLITTS VK.LE CHRISTIAN 
CHUR r E 

Noble Lucas- Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottayer, Supt 

— • \ w 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF JANUARY 20, 1904 



Plattsburg 

Jesse and Carl Wingate, of North 
Bend, were visiting "Les Sebree a 
few days ago. \ 

Tony Bentler, Of Burlington, was 
in this neighborhood a few days 
ago, buying calves. 

Commissary 

Mrs. Ida Bower, of Holten. Ind., 
is visiting her father, Henry Grif- 
fith of Bellevue. 

Misses Emma and Genie Moody 
Artie and Stella Ryle, Mary Gaines 
and Carl Cason, W. G. Kite and 
Miss Maggie Kite, were guests of 
Miss Maud Scott, near here last 
Sunday. 

Belleview 

Susie Smith has been with her 
sister, Mrs. Laura Lacy, of Wil- 
loughby, the past two. weeks. 

The following' are on the sick 
list this week: Alice Cook, Mrs. 
Joseph Maurer, Jake Cook, Agnes 
Cook, Mrs. T. J. Clore, William 
Stamper and Mrs. William Wil- 
liamson. 

Hebron 

Hubert Gaines and sister, Miss 
Kathryn, were guests of relatives 
here Saturday and Sunday. 

Henry Beall gave a party for the 
young people of this vicinity Sat- 
urday night. 

Buffalo 

Mrs. A. J. Utz - and Miss Jessie 
spent last Sunday with Mrs. J. G. 
Elsten and family. 

Mrs. Octavia Ryle and Miss Alma 
Ryle, of Gunpowder, were guests 
of Mrs. Tom Stephens, several days 
ago. 

Big Bone 

The infant son of Thomas Huey 
and wife, has been very sick with 
pneumonia, but he is convalescent. 

George Coyle and bride, of Cres- 
cent Springs, visited his sister at 
this place, last week. 
Hathaway 

Charles Craig, Jr., of East Bend, 
spent Friday with John D. Mc- 
Neely and' family on Gunpowder. 

Henry Ross and Lou Clarkson, 
of near Union, were guests of R. R. 
Houston and Joe Weaver ,last Sat- 
urday. 

Idlewild 

Miss Bernice Duncan will leave 



for Elgin, m., tomorrow, to visit 
her uncle, Rev. J. S. Kirtley. 

Mrs. John Jones attended the 
funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Calvin 
Wingate, of Petersburg. 
Gunpowder 

Mrs. William Phillips, of Ludlow, 
spent several days last week with 
her daughter, Mrs. E. E. Rouse. 

J. H. Tanner and family were 
visiting at Florence, last Sunday, 
guests of W. H. Tanner and wife. 
Erlanger 

Mrs. Carl Price, of Florence was 
the guest of friends here last Sun- 
day. 

Mr. James Lowe and sister, Miss 

Ora, of Williamstown, who have 

been visiting Miss Ida Zinn, have 

returned to their home. 

Limaburg 

Mr. John Utz was visiting Mrs. 
Jemima Tanner, of Gunpwoder, 
Sunday. 

Miss Ottie Rouse and mother are 
ill with tonsilitis. 

Burlington 

In the. deaths of R. Y. Randall 
and T. C. S. Ryle, Boone County 
lost two of her oldest and most 
substantial citizens. 

William Hughes is now a full 
fledged butcher at the stand, until 
recently, occupied by W. C. Brown. 
Personal Mention 

Dr. Duncan was called to Belle- 
view yesterday to see James Rog- 
ers, who has a bad case of pneu- 
monia. 

Paddy Johnson, J. W. Conner 
and John L. Jones, appeared to 
enjoy their stay in Burlington while 
serving as supervisors of the tax 
books. 

R. S. Cowen began hauling tele- 
phone poles for this end of the 
Waterloo line yesterday. 







OUR WANT ADS 



PACK A WALLOP 



T 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

the first man you meet. 




E 



FULL CREDIT 






given on 



g ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME I 






-, * - • 



EE Phone ERL. 87 Ambulance Service M 

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A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral' may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP&STITHJ 

FUNERAL HOME | 

AMBULANCE ; PHONE 



SERVICE 






FLORENCE 13 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 



u/uZ. 



V 

1 



— 




_k 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 







•■ 



I 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



Outlines Practices 

That Make Possible 

20% Increase In Food 



The United States has 358 mil- 
lion acres of suitable cropland now 
in use, from which the U. S. Soil 
Conservation Service estimates it 
is possible to get an average of 20 
percent increase in food produc- 
tion almost immediately by the 
use of standard conservation prac- 
tices. This average increase has 
been recorded on thousands of 
farms under conservation plans. 

Land in the United States is di- 
vided on the basis of its ability 



POSTED 

All persons are nereDy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

J. W. Marsh, Woolper Creek, Bur- 
lington, R. 2. 

Robert S. Hood Estate, Constance 
Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1944. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



easily applied practices of erosion 
control, water conservation, drain- 
age, and irrigation. Crop yields 
due to low fertility can be improv- 
ed by addition of fertilizers • or 
lime. Erosion-control and mois- 
ture-conserving practices most 
commonly needed on this type of 
land are contour tillage, strip crop- 
ping, cover crops, crop rotations 
(that include grasses or legumes, 
for sustained agricultural produc- rough tillage, stubble mulch, and 
tion into eight classes. The classes basin listing, 
range from highly productive, non- Class IH Land 

erodible areas to wasteland, and Class ni land < 140 million acres) 
the first four classes constitute our *■ suitable for permanent cultiva- 
cropland. These four classes and tion w® 1 intensive management 
the type of conservation practices practices. It may require water 
that might need to be applied to conservation, drainage irrigation 
them to bring about this increase < and correction of low fertility by 
in food production are: addition of fertilizer or lime. Fre- 

Class I Land quently a combination of practices, 

k™ T i -i ^ , cft ,,i« ^ > and always a higher degree of 

-(Class I land (50 million acres) Management ski li, i s required to 
1S the most desirable cropland and maintain satisfactory p roduction 
2S. P™ d « ce moderately high to. on class m land than £ classes x 



FLORENCE 



I Mrs. Sarah Ma>kesbery. 
Mr. and Mrsf Wallace Ryle 



or II. If class in soil is on slopes 



h gh yields, the Soil Conserva- 
tion Service has found It is easi- so ste that erosi(m control h fa 
ly worked, nearly level subject to< tiy y ifc need 2 

very httle erosion free from oyer- Iotation ^ ^i dit ches, water- 
flows, well-drained and required Gontour tm coyer 



no special management practices. 



stubble mulch, rough tillafle, or 



Ordinary good farming practices basin tillage-usually several' of 
are required, such as replenislmient ;these on gg same ^ 
of nutrient elements removed by 



crops and lost by leaching, tillage 

practices to maintain good soil ^tlu^han "on class n land 
structure, crop rotations to control 



drainage or irrigation systems are 
likely to be more difficult to in- 



diseases or pests, or green manure ; 
crops to replenish organic matter. 
All of these practices are well 
known, and any or all are com- 1 
monly required to maintain pro- 1 
duction of even the best cropland. 
Class II Land 



>M m '"'.*' W '!«! Hfi m m m ffsm ><M m 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 
FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 



eeiAete 



DIXIE HIGHWAY ot Cro«cs 

ERLMGER 

•,M AN ACE P.:; 0E0R.G&->i4.EMINC- 



Class IV Land 

Class IV land (45 million acres) 
is suitable for -only occasional or 
limited cultivation. It may be 
| steeper, more severely eroded, more 
| susceptible to erosion, more diffi- 
cult to drain or irrigate, less fer- 

i tile, more open and porous than 
Class II land (123 million acres) | class m land It ^ not good for 

is suitable for cultivation withi row crops> and ^ Des t used for 

j permanent vegetation such as grass 

_ | or hay. In humid regions much 

j class IV land may be cultivated 
I occasionally by growing a grain 
| crop every five or six years, follow- 
I ed by several years of hay or pas- 
! ture. If it is in trees at present 
| it should be left in trees unless 
needed for pasture. Although some 
j of this class" IV land is nearly 
j level it cannot be drained suffici- 
i ently well for use in growing in- 
jtertilled crops. In semi-arid re- 
j gions, some class IV land can be 
j used for growing feed crops, pro- 
vided only a small acreage is cult- 
ivated in one place and surround- 
ding land is left in grass. Class IV 
land in dry country is generally 
not suitable for production of 
wheat. 





Suburbon jewelers exclusively 
with modern stores in.- 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD* MAOISONVI 





■i m 4v( »r, »v( »r, k\«i m m »vi m m »v, i\<t »>•■, »v/ m Sw m »>< »»■/ »v, »>■/», 



ADMINISTRATRIX' NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Lloyd D. McGlas- 
json, deceased are requested to 
present same properly proven, ac- 
cording to law, and all persons in- 
debted to the said estate are re- 
quested to call and settle with the 
undersigned. 

Mrs. Pearl McGlasson, 
31-2t-c Administratrix 



I will offer at Public Auction to the 
highest bidder at the Wm. Eggles- s 
ton farm located on 
Creek, on 



SAT. 



, 



u 



*> • ii 



li30P.M. 



The following: One 9-year-old mare; one 10-year-old horse; 
1 Jersey milch cow ; 1 brood sow ; 3 shoats ; 1 hay rake ; 1 mow- 
ing machine; 1 disc harrow; 1 riding cultivator; 1 smoothing 
harrow; 1 single stiovel plow; 1 double shovel plow; 115 feet 
of hay rope and fork; single and doubletrees; 1 Fordson tract- 
or and plows in good condition ; and other articles too numerous 
to mention. 

TERMS-CASH 

CLYDE BARLOW 

' OWNER 

LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



Estel Jack Bingham, 56, a native 
of Grant county, died Wednesday 
at Booth Hospital, Covington. One 
sister, Mrs. Cam Kennedy of Flor- 
ence ^and one brother, Arthur Bing- 
ham "of Burlington, have the sym- 
pathy of the entire county in the 
loss of their brother. 

Prof. A. M. Yealey and Mrs. Lutie 
Aylor spent a pleasant evening 
Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Lon 
Clore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Aylor and 
son, of Aurora, Ind., spent Sun- 
day with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ezra Aylor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor and 
children spent Sunday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs.- Charles 
Snelling and family, of. Woolper 
neighbor 

Mr. tfnd Mrs\ B#n Stephens and 
daughter, of East Bend neighbor- 
hood spent Sunda^Jwith her fath- 
er George Taylor and daughter, 
Mrs. H. Stephens of the Dixie High- 
way. 

Mrs. Lillian Ryle and daughter, 
Mrs. Louise Beateen spent Sunday 
afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. Hobe 
Roberts* and Mrs. Ardell Fox, of 
Price Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elby Dringenburg 
and granddaughter spent Wednes- 
day evening with Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
bert. Lucas. 

Mrs. Jane Bartha and Miss Ruth 
Cahill, daughters of Mrs. Mamie 
Cahill of the Dixie Highway, who 
have been enjoying a visit with her 
husband, Pvt. Melvin Bartha and 
Sgt. Kenneth Ball at Camp McCoy, 
Tomah, Wis., h^ye returned to 
their homes. 

Mrs. Cecil Martin and children 
spent Saturday with Mrs. Alice 
Blackburn and mother. 

Mrs. Hubert Ziegelmire (nee 
Babe Popham) spent the week-end 
with her husband, who is stationed 
at Paducah, Tenn. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Powell Crouch 
of Covington, spent Saturday even- 
ing with his aunt, Mrs. ' Sallie 
Thompson, who has been ilL 

Mrs. Blanche Snyder visited Mrs. 
Emma Rouse on Wednesday after- 
noon. . 

Sgt. Joe McClain and wife (nee 
Ethel Mae Barlow) of Camp Hood, 
Texas, arrived here Sunday to visit 
Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Barlow and will 
spend a 15-day furlough with rela- 
tives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Coyle enter- 
tained .with a six o'clock dinner 
on Saturday evening in compliment 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Coyle and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Rob- 
erts. 

Mrs. K. McClain and mother, 
Mrs. Traylor of Edgewood, were re- 
cent guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. P. 
Barlow. 

Charles Burris and wife, of Bur- 
lington, spent Saturday evening 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
T. Snyder. 

Winfield Myers, of Lafayette,, 
Ind., enjoyed a few days' visit last 
week with his aunt, Mrs. Sallie 
Thompson and uncle Hal Snyder. 

Miss Elizabeth Lowry^of' Bur- 
lington called on Mrs. Ella Barlow 
Saturday afternoon. 

Quite a number from here at- 
tended the Clarence Rogers sale 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor and 
family spent a pleasant evening 
Friday, with Charles Beall and this 
scribe. 

David Tanner, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. I. M. Tanner of U. S. 42 has 
joined the Navy and will leave on 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Schram and 
daughter Bonnie entertained at 
their beautiful - home Thursday 
evening with a luncheon in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and sons Billy Ray and Harold 
Victor. 

' Friends of Mrs. Geneva Souther 
regret to learn of her illness the 
past week. ; I 

Word has been received that Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell House of U. S. 42 
have arrived in Florida and visited 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Nead, of 
Plant City. 

Friends of Miss Dorothy Mc- 
Henry regret to learn of her ill- 
ness at her residence. 

Charles Kelly, of Burlington was 
a welcome visitor here Friday. 

Mrs. Georgia Rouse was the re- 
cent guest of Mrs. Mary E. Rouse 
and son Carlr 

Mr. and_ Mrs. P. J. Allen spent 
Friday in Cincinnati on business. 

Mrs. Rebecca Frances Points and 
daughter of Erlanger visited her 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. 
Stephenson on Tuesday. 

Mrs. Mary. Humphrey of Walton 
called on her friends* Mrs. Blanche 
Beemon, Miss Dorothy McHenry 
and Mrs. F. D. Caton, Friday after- 
noon. I 

E. G. Stephenson has returned 
home after passing a few days at 
Irvine, Ky., on business. .1 

Mrs. Mabel Garnett is the proud 
owner of a new Home Comfort 
range, presented to her by her hus- 
band. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Arnold Of 
Price Pike spent a pleasant even- 
ing Monday with Mr. and Mrs. W. 
M. Markesbery and family. 

Correction: Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Tanner entertained in honor of 
their grandson Cpl. Elmer Home, 
Jr., of Texas, and not their son 
Stanley, as stated. 

Mrs. Helen Crouch moved Wed' 
nesday to a flat of Mrs. Blanche 
Beemon on Dortha Ave. 

Mrs. Geneva Souther was din- 
ner guest Thursday of Mrs. Mae 
Ross. 

Mrs. Zayda Clore, of Walton was 
a dinner guest Friday evening of 



and 
daughter, (J Brlanger were guests 
of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John T. Stephenson, Thursday. 

Mrs. Helen ^rschell has accepted 
a position as^ clerk at the M. G. 
Martin stor;. 

Kenneth Aylor of. Virginia, ar- 
rived here la t week to visit his 
brother Ezra vylor and wife and 
other relative, 

Mr. and M 
Hopeful Road 
day with a 
of their granc 



Harry Tanner, of 
tertained last Sun- 
ner in compliment 
n Cpl. Elmer Home 
Jr., of Texas. ^he following guests 
were present: .^Ir. and Mrs. Elmer 
Home and sjjn Cpl. Elmer, Jr., 
Glenn. Donald and daughter, Mrs. 
Richard Bit ?lrburn and little son, 
Richey, of ^V x > Ohio, Rev. Bruce 
Easterday and wife, of Erlanger, 
Mrs. Lennie Busby and daughter 
Betty Lynn. ^ ' 

Friends of Mrs. Leslie Rose, who 
has been ill a 1 ; the home of her 
daughter, Mrs Oscar Willis at Bel- 
leview, is grea y improved. 

Mr. and Mij W. T. Dugah, of 
Sparta, visited -Chas. Beall and this 
scribe Tuesda* afternoon. 

Mr. and Mr|*Bert Scott and son 
visited Mr. andLtyrs. Lon Clore, last 
Tuesday. . . 

Pvt. Eddie Beteem, who is sta- 
tioned in Tesas, enjoyed several 
days' furlough here with his wife 
and other re 'w ves last week. 

Mrs. Sallie^' hompson, who has 
been ill for sei iral. weeks is great- 
ly improved. 5pe desires to thank 
the W. M. S. of the Baptist Church 
for the lovely flowers presented 
her by Mrs. G. Green last week. 

Mrs. David Wingate and mother 
Mrs. John TT Stephenson visited 
Mrs. Bob Houston Friday, who is a 
patient in Booth Hospital, suffer- 
ing from a broken hip. The acci- 
dent occurred when she fell down- 
stairs at the home of her son Er- 
langer. 
er. 

Friends of U >cle Ezra Aylor re- 
gret to learn t i his illness at his 
residence. | j -^ 

Mr. and Mr, V. P. Kerns are 
planning to speid.a few months fci 
Florida. ■ * 

Quincy Mahomey and family 
entertained a number -of friends 
over the week-end in compliment 
of his son Paul, who joined tne 
Navy. 

Mrs. Floyd !* hinger spent Sun- 
day with her '; /other ,^ Mrs. Cray- 
craft of Germa^town, Ohio, who is 
very ill. 

Pvt. Robert S^pott, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Sco^, who .is stationed 
in a California ^camp, arrived here 
Saturday for a ?5-day furlough. 

Mrs. Lillie Co nn and son Elmer 
had for their g ?sts Sunday even- 
ing, Mrs. Lora 1 idle, Mr. and Mrs. 



Russell Mitchell, Chas. Beall and 
Miss Minnie Baxter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lowe, of Er- 
langer visited Mr. and Mrs. P. J. 
Allen on Sunday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Baker, of 
Ludlow, visited his brother Harve 
Baker and family, Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. John M. Connley and sons 
Ronnie and Dennie left Saturday 
for Harrison, Ohio, to visit her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Baxter 
and family. 

Mrs. . Bud Sullivan, of Erlanger, 
spent Sunday with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Bradford. 

Mr. and Mrs- Gayle Denny and 
children, of Lexington spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
old Conner. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stephenson 
Spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Clayton Brown and family, of 
Covington. 

Mrs. Lennie Easton and Mrs. 
Naomi England spent Monday in 
Covington, shopping. 

Mrs. Charleston, of Latonia 
spent Friday and Saturday with 
Mrs. Lora Laile. 

Friends of Harry Brown regret to 
learn of his illness at his home 
in Covington. We wish for him a 
speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Nancy Garrison of Morrow, 
Ohio, called on Mr. and Mrs. Rus- 
sell Mitchell, Friday. 

Atty. Paul Tanner of Frankfort, 
spent the week-end with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Lon Tanner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Corbin, of 
Covington spent a pleasant even- 
ing Friday with his mother, Mrs. 
Lillie Corbin. 

Friends of G. K. Kindard regret 
to learn of his illness at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Nancy Gar- 
rison at Morrow, O. 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 

Ross Shinkle. killed hogs Friday. 

Bro. Hogan and wile and son 
spent Saturday night with Huey 
Ryle and wife. 

Mrs. Dick Schwenkel called on 
the Shinkle family, Saturday aft- 
ernoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sebree 
spent Saturday, with Garland Huff 
and family. I 

Tom Huff called on Garland 
Huff. Saturday morning. 

Emerson Bunger called on the 
Shinkle family, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sebree took 
dinner Sunday with their daughter 
and husband, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. 
Love. . 

Wayne Arrasmith is spending a 
brief furlough at home. 

Huey Ryle and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eldon Ryle and son were 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Hamilton. 

Mrs. Tom Hamilton spent Mon- 
day afternoon with Mrs. Elizabeth 
Miller. 

Tom Hamilton called on Frank 
Sebree, Monday afternoon. 

Mrs. Francis Shinkle,! Mrs. Chas. 
Feldhaus, Miss Alma : Schwenke 
and 'Edith Sebree helped the 
Shinkle girls with their hog kill- 
ing dinner Friday. 

Jean Schwenke made; a business 
trip to Burlington, Saturday morn- 
ing. I 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 




You Can't 

Tell 'Em Like 
This :: Use A 

Want Ad 




TARPAULINS 

AFTER SELLING YOUR TOBACCO, STOP AND 
SEE OUR LINE OF TARPAULINS 

I * 

All sizes — Prices reasonable. 
WE DO REPAIRING 

Covington Awning & Roofing Co. 

l / 2 sq. south of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse 
301 Scott St. Covington, Ky. Hiland 1735 




^Uplcuf rfpnc44dly--da you* poti 

• ' 41 ^ r/l/lOTii IAJAT> MAM 



in Uve FOURTH WAR LOAN 



This >s 1944 — year of decision. 

Milftbos of your fellow Americans 
poised for all-out attack on Fortress 
Europe. They are prepared to sacrifice 
everything — even life itself — to de- 
livery knockout blow. 

But guts alone won't do the job. It'll 
take mountains of munitions and sap- 
plies which must be kept coming in a 
never-ending stream. What has been 
used v p to now is only a trickle conv 
pared^to what will be needed when 
the Big Push begins. 



And that's where you come in. You 
can do your part by buying extra War 
Bonds during the Fourth War Loan. 
Not with your spare change. Not by 
spending what's left over after indulg- 
ing your fancy.. But by digging down 
deep... by doing without things... 
by sacrificing with the same selfless 
devotion «o duty that is being shown 
by our boys over there. 

The Fourth War Loan begins January 
IS. Buy at least one extra $100 War 
Bond as your personal contribution to 
Victory. 



1&A& BACK THE ATTACK! 



\ 



this Advertisement Sponsored by 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

-4 



if. 



* 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



i 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Collins and 
Mrs. Minnie Shaw, Thursday even- 
ing. " 

Mrs. Clint Riddle spent Friday 
with Mrs. Joe Aylor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. John Kilgour and daughters, 
Saturday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wilson en- 
tertained Sunday for Mr. and 
Mrs. John Jones and Rev. and Mrs. 
E. M. Helton and son Billy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 



U. S. War Department 

Certification of Authority 

AG 095 Expires Aug. 10, 

1945 

USEFUL 

NEEDS 

FOR 

Service 



daughter Jean called on his moth- 
er, Mrs. Octavia Day, of Florence, 
Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 
and daughters, Mrs. Evelyn Wil- 
son and Mrs. Edna Eggleston spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. George 
Eggleston. 

Miss Alice Eggleston entertained 
Sunday, Miss Juanita Muntz, of 
Ohio and Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Ryle 'and daughter Jean. 

Miss Irene Green entertained on 
Sunday for Mrs. Tom Bradley and 
Mr? and Mrs. Marshall, of Ohio. 

fl|r. and Mrs. Norman Craddock 
an* family moved last week to a 
far a near Burlington. We regret to 
los these good neighbors from our 
midst. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Earl Whit- 
aker were Sunday guests of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Og 
den. \ 

Mr. and Mrs. William Blaker and 
family were guests of Mr. and Mrs 
Jake Blaker, Sunday. 






HAMILTON 




FURLOUGH BAGS 

ROLL KITS -APRON KITS 

SHOE SHINE KITS 

SEWING KITS 

MONEY BELTS 

GARRISON CAPS 

OVERSEAS CAPS 

TIES - BELTS - SWEATERS 

CHEVRONS - COLLAR ENSIGNIA 

SHOULDER PATCHES 

SERVICE RD3BONS 

GARRISON BELTS 



EF- 




Army Store 

508 MADISON AVE. 

Near 5th COVINGTON Near 5th 



Mr. and Mrs. Everett Jones en- 
tertained Sunday in honor of Bro. 
and Mrs. Sam Hogan and baby son 
of Louisville, Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Aylor and son, Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Shields and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Jones and family, Mrs. 
Edward Bowen, Waller Jones and 
Colon Riggs. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hamilton en- 
tertained Sunday in honor of Mr. 
and Mrs. Huey Ryle and son Floyd, 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff and Mr. 
and Mrs. Eldon Ryle and son. 

Charlie Allphin was in Coving- 
ton one day last week. 

Several from this community 
have sold their tobacco, all receiv- 
ing high prices. 

Mrs. Frances Aylor entertained 
the W. M. S., Thursday. 

Mrs. Georgia Ryle called on her 
aunt, Mrs. Elva Norman in Union, 
Wednesday, while Mr. Ryle made a 
trip to the doctor at Florence. We 
are sorry Mr. Ryle is in ill health. 

Mr. and Mrs. Huey Ryle enter- 
tained Bro. and Mrs. Sam Hogan 
and baby son overnight Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orin Edwards re- 
ceived word of the death of hisf 
uncle in Erlanger, Saturday. 

Biddie Huff is stripping tobacco 
for Bill Ogden. 



CALVES ROLL IN 

4-H CLUB MONEY 



DEVON 



Mr. and Mrs. John Duval, of In- 
diana called on Mr. and Mrs. Bill 
Feldhaus and son and Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Holzworth on Tuesday. 

Miss Mary Bresser has been ill 
at her home this past week. We 
wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood, Mr. 
and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter and 
sons, Mrs. Maggie Glacken, Carey 
and Dan Carpenter called on Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Holzworth and 
family and helped cut feed on 
Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
and sons and Mrs. Maggie Glack- 
en called on Mrs. Alma Glacken 
and family, of Covington, and vis- 
ited Cpl. James R. Glacken who is 
enjoying a fifteen-day furlough 
with his family and friends. 

Doc Stanley of Spanish Villa 
sold his crop of tobacco consisting 
of 2600 pounds for an average of 
$54.00 per hundred. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Feldhaus and 
son returned to their home in 
Hamilton, Thursday afternoon, fol- 
lowing a short stay with her uncle, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth. 

This neighborhood was sadden- 
ed to hear of the death of Wil- 
liam H. Sutherland, who passed 
away at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Martin Senour. Mr. Suther- 
land was a former resident of this 
place. We extend sympathy to the 
entire family. 

Miss Kathern A. Holzworth and 
Mrs. Rose Lunkenheimer, of Cov- 
ington called on Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Reverman and son and Pete 
Eckles, who is ill at Price Hill. 

Mrs. Clara Smiley and daughter 
Patricia, Mrs. Alma Glacken, Miss 
Louise Ransom, of Covington and 
Cpl. James R. (Rod) Glacken, of 
Tallahassee, Fla., called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Carpenter and family 
Sunday. 



PETERSBURG 



Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Berkshire are 
spending two weeks with their son 
Frank and daughter of Lawrence- 
burg. Mrs. Frank Berkshire is 
convalescing at Christ Hospital 
from a recent major operation. 

Mrs. Lyman Christy is improving 
we are glad to report. 

Little . Miss Barbara Ann Chris- 
ty has had tonsilitis this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Florian Holton, of 



The calf -raising project boost- jSylacauga, Ala.,; returned home last 
ed 4-H club results in Christian I Sunday. They are now enroute to 
county, Kentucky, last year, says | Seattle, Wash., where he has em- 
Carl H. Lay, assistant county | ployment. They were calling 



agert. Ninety calves exhibited at 
a sfcbw at Hopkinsville weighed a 
tota of 85,000 pounds, sold for an 
average of $15.12 a hundred, and 
brought in a total of $12,852. 



Tr: A Want Ad— They Sell 



on 
friends here Wednesday afternoon. 

We hear W. O. Rector has bought 
the Kelly property and will move 
there in the early spring. Embry 
Klopp will move to the Rector 
farm. 

Mrs. J. T. Bradburn and grand- 



PUBLIC 

AUCTION 

On account of the death of my mother and brother, I will sell 
at absolute auction tljru the A. S. Rice Real Estate Agency, my 
farm, stock, tools anc feed, rain or shine at the farm on Horse- 
branch Rd, l / 2 mile West of Sanf ordtown and near St. John 
Orphanage, on 

SAT., 

^VT 12:00 P.M. 

The following descriljed property: Farm, 60 acres (more or 
less), 6-room house, with electric, large dairy barn and all neces- 
sary outbuildings; land lays level to rolling; well fence and wat- 
ered ; lot of alfalfa and tobacco land ; plenty of limestone. Has 
been used as dairy farm for 60 years or more. Can be seen any 
date. 

STOCK — 17 head cows and heifers, consisting of fresh ones, 
heavy springs and some giving good flow of milk; Whiteface 
bulls; 1 pair good farm mules; 100 laying hens to be sold in 
dozen lots. 

MISCELLANEOUS— About 5 tons alfalfa hay; 1940 % ton 
Chevrolet truck, panel body, driven 18,400 miles in perfect con- 
dition. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS— Mowing machine and hay rake; iron 
wheel wagon; 2 sleds ; turning plow; hillside plow; 2 cultivators; 
corn drill; disc harrow; lot of harness; hoes, rakes, axes, forks; 
100 ft. rope; fence stretchers; scalding box; lard press; sausage 
mill L almost new ; electric cream seperator. 

• Coal Range; Estate Heatrola; some household and kitchen furn- 
iture and other things too numerous to mention. 

TERMS ON FARM ANNOUNCED ON DAY QF SALE 
TERMS ON STOCK and TOOLS, ETC., CASH 

MISS CECELIA DELANEY, OWNER 

LLOYD E. TANNER, SALES MGR., WITH 

A. S. RICE REAL ESTATE AGENCY, Agents 



son spent Monday afternoon with 
Mrs. Burgess Howard. 

Mrs; J. N. Thompson and Mrs. 
Stella Gaines spent Friday after- 
noon 'with Mrs. Herman Mathews. 

Mrs. C. R. Reading called on her 
nephew L. S. Chambers and Mrs. 
Chambers on Friday afternoon. 

Miss Joanna Gordon is recover- 
ing after a two weeks' attack of 
flu. 

Mrs. Laura Crisler has been 
quite ill at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Pearl McGlasson. 

Mrs. Sue MorgarC of Bellevue 
spent last week With her aunts, 
Mrs. Eunie McWethy and Miss Lou 
Ella McWethy, both of whom have 
been suffering with flu, but are 
better. 

Word was received here of the 
death of Delbert Rosebloom at 
Frankfort, O., on Tuesday. His re- 
mains were brought here for buri- 
al Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Rose- 
bloom was reared in this commu- 
nity and we extend our sincere 
sympathy to the family. 

Mrs. L. S. Chambers was hostess 
to the Homemakers' Club on last 
rhursday. 

Mrs. Burgess Howard entertained 
the W. M. U. of the Baptist Church 
with an all-day meeting Friday. 

The house occupied by Wilson 
Leek and family caught fire Thurs- 
day night, but damage was slight. 

Miss Elizabeth Walton has been 
ill the past Week with bronchitis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry Carver's 
dinner guests Sunday were Mr. 
and Mrs. Lee Meyers, of Hyde Park, 
Mrs. Eva Carver and Miss Elizabeth 
Walton. 

Wilson Lee moved to the W. O. 
Rector farm, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Alloway en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lamp- 
kin and daughter and -several 
friends from Sayler Park on Sun- 
day, the occasion being "Podge's" 
75th birthday. They attended ser- 
vices at the Christian Church in 
the morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Edwards 
received word that their son Wil- 
son had arrived in the states and 
is convalescing in a hospital in 
North Carolina, after receiving a 
serious leg injury in action. 



fflLL**TO 



p 



Mesdames Leh nan Qoodridge, 
Harold Schneider* A. W. Rogers, 
Reuben Asbury, Henry Anderson 
and. H. S. Tanner attended the 
Hebron Homemarars' meeting last 
Wednesday at the home of Mrs. 
.Craddock. 

Miss Juanita Muhtz, of Westwood 
Ohio* was the week-end guest of 
her aunt, Mr. an 1 Mrs. Truman 
Lucas. 

Mrs. Mary C. Gross was the 
pleasant caller Friday afternoon 
of Mrs. Norman Harbstrelt and 
little daughter, T anda Kay. 

Recent guests \fi the Asbury 
family were his aunt, Mrs. Cora 
Harber, of Mt^ Olivet .and his 
mother, Mrs. Ma |de ' Asbury, of 
Florence. » ; 

Mrs. Robert Mq^re and children 
spent a few day; ilast week with 
Mr. and Mrs, Joh i Moore, of near 
Hebron. Mf 

Mr. and Mrs. WD. Carder call 

ed on Mr. and M s. Henry Ander 
son and childrer Tuesday even 
ing. ^, 

Mr. and Mrs. *jTruman Lucas 
spent Friday nigr, jf with Mrs. Wm. 
Rawls and little laughter Linda, 
of Covington. ^ 

Mrs. Harold Sdfcieider, recently 
attended a shower, at the home of 
Mrs. Clarence Ne rberry, of New- 
port, u 

A. W. Rogers is -.visiting his par- 
ents in Georgia. 

Mrs. Kittie Clor^ 
daughter, Mr. as 
Barnes, of Cincini 

Virgil Happley 
evening for his lutae in Minonfc, 
111., after spending two weeks with 
his cousins the Jergens and Herb- 
streit families. .p. 

Henry Anderson ^attended a sale 
at Florence, Satu day afternoon. 

Mrs. Edna Eggl jton, spent last 
Sunday with Mr. j tad Mrs. George 
Eggleston and faraly, of Frances- 
ville. f 

Mrs. Duke PurceU is on the sick 
list. 

Mr. and Mrs. OWper Hempfling 
called on his sistiVg-Mr. and Mis. 
Art Connley, of St^ingtown, Sun- 
day. 



is visiting her 

• Mrs. Walter 

!ti. 

j left Sunday 



WOMEN SAVE MONEY 

BY WISE SHOPPING 

Homemakers in Christian coun- 
ty did some patriotic and wise 
clothes shopping in their homes 
last year, thereby saving them- 
selves an estimated $2,062. Realiz- 
ing the importance of good equip- 
ment, they cleaned and oiled 351 
sewing machines and purchased 
121 new ones. Then they renew- 
ed garments by cleaning 536 pieces 
and dyeing 569. Six hundred and 
thirty-one items of wearing ap- 
parel were made from good used 
material oh hand, while 2,757 gar- 
ments were mended and repaired, 
according to records in the office 
of Home Agent Mary Ellen Mur- 
ray. Using cotton sacks, these 
women made 1,179 articles of cloth- 
ing and household items. One 
hundred and thirty hats were 
cleaned and remade. 



1005 SCOTT ST. 



COLONIAL 0595 



CONSTANCE 

Mrs. Paul Craven and Mrs: Man- 
ilus Goodridge called on Mrs. Dun- 
can Huey and daughter Wednes- 
day evening. 

Glad to report that Mrs. Bertha 
Lane is improving after her recent 
illness. 

Mrs. Mamie Barlow and chil- 
dren of Hebron were calling on 
her mother, Mrs. George Heist, 
Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Louise Lutkehaus of Ham- 
ilton, Ohio, spent the week-end 
tyith Mrs. Lena Fritz: 
I Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Kottmyer 
spent Thursday in Cincinnati. 

Irvin Hood and daughters en- 
tertained the following guests on 
Sunday: Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Purdy 
and family, W. G. Kite and Mrs. 
Addie Ryle. Mrs. Ryle remained 
for a visit. 

Mrs. Lena Fritz and Mrs. W. E. 
Zimmer spent Wednesday after- 
noon with their brother, who is in 
Christ Hospital. 

Dave Turner was calling on 
Barney Turney and wife Friday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Charles Hodges, Mrs. James 
Clayton and Mrs. Charles Kott- 
myer spent Monday with Mrs. 
Harold Burton, of Latonia. 

Mrs. W. E. Zimmer, Mrs. Henry 
Kottmyer, Mrs. Duncan Huey and 
daughter spent Tuesday afternoon 
with Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Huey and 
daughter, of Burlington. 

Pvt. palph Prabel, of Aberdeen, 
Md., spent the past week with his 
Darents. Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Prabel. - 

Miss Olivenell Kottmyer and 
Otho Daniel Heist have been on 
the sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burton and 
daughter, af Latonia, spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Kott- 
myer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Dolwick and 
daughter, of Pqint Pleasant and 
Miss Edith Carder, of Hill Top at- 
tended services at Constance 
Christian Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Heist and 
son Ralph and Miss Jean Faust, 
of Norwood; O., were Sunday 
guests of Mrs. George Heist. Ralph 
had a nine-day leave after grad- 
uating from the University of Wis- 
consin U. S. Naval Radio School. 

Mr. and Mrs. (Stanley Maegley 
and family of Crescent Springs 
spent Sunday with Mrs. Fred 
Prabel and Charlie. 

Anyone having news items for 
this column, please leave at Geo. 
Kottmyer's store by noon Monday. 



_d_ 



BELLE7IEW 

Mrs. Mary C. Sanford and Miss 
Anna Cason spen. Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs; T. a. Cason. Others 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Lennie 
Love and children hi Union. 

Mrs. Alice Aylof- spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs Franklin Clore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ha, ry Ashcraft and 
daughter were visiting Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Childon and 
children, of Campjellsburg, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. L. McNeely 
and children, of Maderia, Ohio, 
were week-end gvssts of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. E. McNeely. 

Mrs. Mary E. Scheben and 
daughter, of Erla lger have been 
visiting with Mr.»and Mrs. Sher- 
man Burcham and daughter. 

Pvt. Emmett Louden, of Camp 
Bowie, Texas was 'isiting relatives 
in this community? Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Kirtley 
and daughter an<? Mr., and Mrs. 
Orville Hensley and sons, of East 
Bend spent Sunday with Mrs. 
Christena Kirtley. 

W. B. Rogers, Sr., remains ill. 
Orville Rice has also been on the 
sick list the past week. 

Congratulations o Pvt?" and Mrs. 
Lee Roy McNeeljr (nee Thelma 
Hancock, who were married last 
week. 

Misses Jean a. d Irene White 
spent Sunday wim Mr. and Mrs. 
Marvin Ligon and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Flick re- 
ceived word that heir son Harold, 
is now* stationed Jrt the U. S. Ma- 
rine bise in' San Diego, Calif. 

Mr. a»d Mrs. Ralph Cason, Betty 
and I^an, Mr. ajd Mrs. Lillard 
Scott, and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Carl Qriesser an<? daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. E. Wf Iton and daugh- 
ter wefe Sunday i uests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen Burcnam and son, of 
Petersburg. f 

Mrs. Sherman Burcham is visit- 
ing her daughter and family, Mr. 
and Mrs. James i E. Ransom and 
daughter, of Lou'sville, Ky. 

y 



were shopping in Covington, Sat- 
urday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Rogers spent 
Wednesday and Thursday with 
their daughter, Mrs. Alvin Buff- 
ington at Sayler Park. 

Mrs. John Rogers, Mrs. Martha 
Feltman and daughter and Mrs. 
Ashcraft and Mrs. H. E. Arnold 
spent Wednesday with Mrs. Allen 
Rogers. 

Mrs. Bobbie Rogers spent Wed- 
nesday with her mother, Mrs. Fred 
Birkle. 

Jim Rogers called on. his father 
and Mr. and Mrs. Ott Rogers last 
Thursday. 

Mrs. Abdon entertained relatives 
Sunday. 
Web Rogers was ill last week. 





WOMEN GET BREAK 

The ladies get a break by the 
OPA (Office of Price Administra- 
tion) ruling that certain types of 
women's shoes are permitted to be 
sold without the collection of th« 
usual ration coupons. 

Consequently, until the period 
expires, Feb. 5, The Recorder may 
carry special announcements of 
Boone and Kenton Counties' shoe 
merchants offering bargains with- 
in the ruling of the OPA. It's a 
"holiday that thrifty women shop- 
pers will appreciate. 

__ 

1 ■ ■ i 



f*W EASIER WAY 
^TOSOU/E 

Business 

TROUBLES 
IS 
TO 

Advertise 

HERE^ 




DON T DELAY THE 
EXAMINATION 

If your eyes feel strained, 
uncomfortable, or tire easily 
when reading, come to us at 
once for a careful check-up. 



Illllllllllllllllll 

GUITARS 

$15.00 up 

USED TENOR 
BANJO 

$12.00 

ROY ACUFF AND OTHER 
GUITAR, CORD AND IN- 
INSTRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE MUSICAL 

WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 



' 



HANSER JEWELRY ft 
MUSIC COMPANY 

515 1 .> Madison Ave. 
Covington, -:- Kentucky 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



For years many Northern • 
Kentuckians have found eye 
comfort and good vision by 
entrusting their optical 
trouble to us. 



H 




iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiuiitiiim 

Most of your 

t ■ J o 

friends away? 

• If most of your friends are 
away now — in the service — do- 
ing war jobs — don't you feel 
left hehind sometimes? 

Why not get in the midst of 
this war? Join the WAC! 

You can see new places, 
make new friends, learn in- 
teresting things — while you are 
doing vital work to speed vic- 
tory. 

The Army needs your help, 
urgently. This is your chance! 

For full details apply at the 
nearest U. S. Army Recruiting 
Station (your local post office 
will give you the address). Or 
write. The Adjutant General, 
Room 4415, Munitions Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

IllllllllllllllllllllllUllllUillUllilllllllllllll 



K 



— REGISTERED JERSEYS — I 

WHY SELECTIVE REGISTRATION 

PROTECTS BUYER: Too many times the buyer has accepted 
an implied "guarantee" in the registration certificate that was 
not there in fact. Ancestry was guaranteed, but the KIND of 
ancestry was not. Buyers of Registered Jersey Bulls now have 
assurance that their interests are in part protected by a study 
of the production history in the immediate ancestry of their 
bull calf. • j » 



GASBUR£ 

Glad to reporr that all on the 
sick list are improved. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanlf Smith and 
children moved fyiis • fek to John 
Maurer's farm. 

Mrs. Howard Hue^ ; and Mrs. 
Wallace Aylor vjre ; . chopping in 
Covington one d£y la, t week. 

Mrs. ' Ann Townserji spent the 
week-end with h >me fblks. 

Mrs. Cord Cox and s^n Willie and 
Paul Nixon spent Friday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector 
and daughter. « 

Miss. Joyce Foggin is spending 
this week with Mr. and Mrs. How- 
ard Huey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brabrburri 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Charlie White. 

Dr. and Mrs. G. F.. Smith, Of 
Lawrehceburg, called on their sis- 
ter, Mrs. W. O. Rector and daugh- 
ter, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Leek moved 
to W. 6. Rector's farm Sunday. Mr. 
and Mrs. Recto and daughter will 
move in the n^ar future to the 
home they purchased from Mrs. 
Blanche Beemon in Petersburg. 

Bill Bradbury and wife, of Cov- 
ington spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Charley White. 

Mr. and Mrs . Allen Rogers and 
daughter and Mrs. John Rogers 



S. WHITEHOUSE DUNLAP-FARM 



L. C. FISH, Herdsman, 

Richwood, Kentucky U. S. 25 



s 

H 

Z 
H 

X 
H 

X 

X 
N 
X 
N 
X 
M 



x Herd T. B. and Bang Tested 

H 

S H 

tXNSHXMXHXHZHZHZMZHZHXHXHXlNXHXHXHXNZHXNXMXHXNXHXMXHXIff 



i.'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii 

I WASHERS REPAIRED I 



AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SER 
MAYTAG OIL 




WM. HAGEDORN 1 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. | 
niiimiiiiiiiimiiiNiiiiiiimmmimiiMimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiim imirf? 



USED CAR BARGAINS 

1937 FORD COACH ....~.,..$295 

1937 DeSOTO SEDAN -$375 

1940 DeSOTO SEDAN, 7-passenger :...$1250 

1937 DODGE COACH :$350 

1937 OLDSMOBILE COACH : $375 

1937 (TWO) STUDEBAKER COUPES $350 

1936 CADILLAC $325 

1939 HUDSON 4-DOOR $695 

1937 FORD COUPE $295 

1937 CHRYSLER SEDAN $295 

1939 DODGE 4-DOOR SEDAN $695 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 

1937 PACKARD COUPE $345 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN $245 

1938 WILLYS SEDAN $325 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



wmmm 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



pilllllllillllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIM 

Seen And Heard Around 



\i\\\\\\\ 



The County Seat 

1 



Mrs. Ida Balsly is much improv- 
ed after a recent illness. 



Little Miss Beryl Jones is quite 
ill with throat trouble. 



Miss Mary Bess Jarrell spent the 



week-end with Miss 
Brady, of Belleview. 



Emma May 



Mrs. Alva Snow, who has been ill 
with pneumonia at Christ Hospital 
return^ to her home last week. 

Mr. and Mi-sV; Cajrl tJason have 
purchased the home owned by Mr. 
and Mrs. Leon Ryle, of McVille. • 



The Federal and State Bank ex- 
aminers are making the regular 
annual examination of the Peoples 
Deposit Bank this week. 



Pvt JSkeets Louden called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Horton and 
family, Sunday. 



Miss Inez Martin spent Friday 
night with Betty and Sue Horton 
and attended the basketball game 
at Hebron. 



Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Rector, of 
Erianger, were Sunday guests of 
Mrs. Myrtle Atyt and daughter 
Wilma. 



\> 



Mrs. Al Stephens, of Petersburg, 
called on her mother, Mrs. Lee 
Huey and her sister, Mrs. Walter 
Brown, one night last week. 



The many friends of Herbert 
Snyder were glad to see him out 
Saturday, after a recent illness. 



Miss Luclle Cotton spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs, W. B. 
Cotton and daughter Ruby, of La- 
tonia. 



Orville Senour, who lives with his 
daughter, Mrs. Galen Kelly, was ill 
several days last week. 



Mrs. Charles N. Benson spent the 
week-end with relatives at Eriang- 
er- 

Robert W. Smith, of Burlington 
R. 2, was a business visitor at this 
office Saturday morning. 



Rev. R> F. Demoisey, of Walton, 
who supplied the pulpit in the ab- 
sence of Rev. R. A. Johnson, Sun- 
fday, was -the guest Sunday of Mr. 
and Mrs. Earl Smith and family. 



I 



Your 

Eyes 






Have headaches — nervous? 
Perhaps your eyes are the 
cause. An examination may 
reveal it. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 
5 PikS Street, Covington 
Phone HEmlock 0700 J 



Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter, 
of Florence paid The Recorder of- 
fice a pleasant call Monday morn- 
ing. * 

•; i££L. • 

H. J, Kelly and Lonnie Tanner, 
of Florence were business visitors 
at The - .Recorder of f ice Monday 
morning. 



Cpl. Edwin Walton, of Tulsa, 
Okla., is spending a furlough with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Phelps 

Walton, of Hebron. 

- ■ - . . - • 

Leonard Cook, of Walton was a 
brief called at the county seat 
Monday. While in town he called 
at The Recorder office, fft 

Mrs. Katherine G. Brady, of Bur- 
lington R. 1 was a pleasant caller 
at The Recorder office Saturday 
morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector of 
near Petersburg were business vis- 
itors in Burlington Monday. While 
here they called at The Recorder 
office. 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter Horton and 
two children Helen Faye and 
Scbtty called on Mr. and Mrs. W. 
D. Brown and Mrs. Forest Brown, 
Sunday evening. 



jtf XHXHSHXHXHZH XHXHX 



HXNXHXMXHXHXHZMXHXHXHXHXHXHXNXHXMXf 



WAR BONDS 



Make that subscription to the Fourth War Bond 
Drive as soon as possible. 

The soldiers who are prote< ting us need your sup- 
port and Uncle Sam is generous enough to pay Vou 
interest for your money and pay back the princip- 
al at maturity. 

You can not afford not to subscribe to the limit. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY & 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 



Visitors at this office Saturday 
morning were Frank Hager, Walton 
R 2; Alvin E. Whitaker, Burlington 
R. 1; Bernard Sebree, Woolper. 



Edna Doan, of Covington was a 
business visitor in Burlington last 
Saturday morning, and while here 
called at this office. 



— -y 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



FOUR REAL ESTATE 
DEALS COMPLETED 






H O 






THREE FARMS AND ONE PIECE 
OF TOWN PROPERTY CHANGE 
HANDS DURING PAST FEW 
DAYS. 



Chester 



i 
- 






Mr. Mart Benson and Mr. Geo. 
P. Nicholson of Walton were visit- 
ing relatives here one day last 
week. 



Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
entertained with a turkey dinner 
in honor of Sgt. James R. Glacken 
on Sunday. The following guests 
were present: Sgt. James R. Glack- 
en, Miss Louise Ransom, Mrs. Her- 
man Smiley and daughter Patricia 
Louise, Mrs. Alma Glacken, Miss 
Mary Bresser, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Robinson and G. L. Robinson. 



BURLINGTON R. 2 



nXNXHSKSHSHBHXHXHSHSHZHXHKHSMXHZHXHXHXHXHXHXHZHXMXHSH 



The Home Store 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiMiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle ea. 6c 

PTZ POWDER 1 lb. $1.60 

PTZ POWDER 5 lb. 7.50 

j [] 1 

MUSTARD GREENS, No. 2 can, 6 points ..each 10c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can, no points each 15c 

PUMPKIN, No. VA can, 15 points each 17c 

TOMATOES, No. &tt can, 15 points ( each 19c 

TOMATOES, No. 2 can, 13 points I each 14c 

TOMATOES, No. 1 can, 5 points . . . ? each 7c 

?URND? GREENS, No. 2 can, 6 points each 10c 

LK & BEANS, 20 oz. can, 13 poiits... . ., 2 for 25c 

SWEET POTATOES, No. 2^2 can, n< points each 20c 

CARROTS, No. 2 can, 4 points each lie 

PEAS, No. 2 can, 15 points v , each 13c 

PEAS, small, No. 2 can, 15 points. each 17c 

CORN, Country Gentleman, No. 2 ca i, 13 points each 14c 

CORN, Whole Kernel, No. 2 can 13 points each 16c 

MIXED VEGETABLES, No. 2 can, 14 points. each 13c 

KRAUT, 32 oz. can, no points r «. each 20c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 214 can, 36 points ... .each 28c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2 can, 30 points each 25c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 qt., 14 oz. no points./ each 35c 

TOMATO JUICE, 46 oz.. 6 points each 25c 

PLUMS, No. ZVz can, 15 points each 20c 

PEACHES, No. ZY2 can 27 points \ , each 27c 

PEANUT BUTTER, pt. size L each 35c 



47 -IN. 12-IN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD FENCE ,....** rod 55c 

26-IN. MED. WEIGHT 6-IN. STAY rod 50c 

4-FT. POULTRY FENCE rod 60c 

4-POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll $4.50 



We are having some fine winter 
weather. 

Bro. and Mrs. Sam Namilton 
spent Saturday night with Mr. 
and Mrs. O. D. Purdy. 

Clinton Rowe is working in Law- 
renceburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Purdy took 
grandma Ryle to Constance, Sun- 
day. 

Callers on Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Cook Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. 
Cam White, Mrs. Percy Ryle, Mrs. 
Lou Williamson, Miss Mary Lou 
and Gene R> Purdy .>^/ 

Members of the MaHfcoat family 
are able to be out again after hav- 
ing the flu. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cook of Flor^ 1 * * 1S h ° m . e HfFX. 
ence, Ind., were visitors at the 
homes of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Cook 
and Mr. and Mrs. H. Presser. 

Harold Lloyd Presser is ill with 
mumps. 

Miss Mildred Kittle and Emily 
Alice Deck spent a few days With 
Kermit Mallicoat and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dock Philson pur- 
chased the property of Howard 
Presser in McVille, the past week. 

G. Ryle hasn't. been feeling so 
good the past week. 

Miss Lucille Nead was guest of 
Tommie Stevens and mother, Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cason pur- 
chased the property of Leon Ryle 
the past week. The property is lo- 
cated in McVille. 

Glad to heaT Clifford Sutton 
much improved. 



is 



100 LBS. 24% DAIRY L $3.15 

100 LBS. 16% DAIRY \j; $2.90 

100 LBS. SHELLED CORN ■;...: $2.90 

1 •' $2.90 



100 LBS. GROUND WHEAT. 



WOOD HEATING STOVES $5.50 to $10.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3- room size ..$45.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4 -room size .$60.00 

GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



COMMITTEES OUTLINE 

COUNTY WAR PROGRAM 

Five committees planned a war- 
time farm program for Madison 
county, Kentucky, and placed their 
recommendations in the hands of 
County Agent J. L. Miller. Here 
are some of their suggestions. 

Keeping the number of hurley 
tobacco plants under 9,000 to the 
acre will save labor but will not 
reduce yield or quality. Plants 
should be spaced 12 to 21 inches 
in rows 3 feet 3 inches to 3 feet 
6 inches apart. 

Use more fertilizer on about all 
crops, especially on tobacco. Spray 
tobacco plant beds with the blue- 
stone-lime solution to help con- 
trol diseases. 

Grow disease-resistant varieties 
of tobacco, hybrid corn, balbo rye 
and other improved grains, and 
alfalfa. 

Produce hogs in line with feed 
grown in the county. Raise two 
litters a year on b clean ground. 
Vaccinate against cholera. Provide 
pasture, minerals and balanced ra- 
tions. 

To cattle, feed less grain and 
more hay and pasture. Grow 
balbo rye and barley for grazing. 
Control the heel fly. 

Use the new phenothiazine treat- 
ment to control sheep parasites. 
Feed grain to standardized lambs. 
Produce 200 to 250 pounds of hay 
for each ewe. 

Buy baby chicks as close home 
as possible and from good hatch- 
eries. Select a good laying strain; 
hatch in March for early fall eggs; 
raise chicks on clean ground; sell 
roosters when hatching season is 
over; cull flocks and feed well. 



Mrs. Chester Tanner sold her 
farm of 107 acres located on the 
hill east of Limaburg to Rollie and 
Cartney Kenton last week. The 
improvements consist of two dwell- 
ings, two large barns and other 
outbuilding. The land is very pro- 
ductive and has been in Mrs. Tan- 
ner's family many years. The Ken- 
tons had sold their farm of 345 
acres out on the East Bend Road 
several weeks ago to Mrs. Edna 
Doan of Covington, but formerly 
of Harrison County. It will be re- 
called that the Kenton family 
moved from Bourbon County to 
this county two or three years ago 
when they purchased the farm 
where they now reside, and we are 
glad to learn that they will con- 
tinue to reside in Boone County. 

Willaim Wahl sold his farm of 
40 acres one mile east of Hebron 
on Highway 20 to Alfred Dolwick 
of Constance last week and will 
give possession March 1st. This 
farm has been in the Wahl family 
more than fifty years. 

Mrs. Louisa B. White sold her 
farm of 98 acres 1% miles out on 
the Burlington-Belleview highway 
last week to Jesse J. Vastine of 
Covington. Mr. Vastine is a close 
friend of Mr. W. A. McLoney, who 
owns the farm known as the Sam 
Hall farm on which there is a log 
house. The White farm has been 
idle for the past 17 or 18 years and 
the buildings need repairing. Mr. 
Vastine plans to clean up the land 
and repair the buildings and make 



Mrs. Blanche Beemon sold her 
house and lot in Petersburg to Mr. 
and Mrs. W. O. Rector a few days 
ago, where Mrs. Beemon's father 
and mother lived until their death, 
and was ' formerly the home of 
James Thompson and family. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rector and daughter 
have rented their farm to a ten- 
ant and will move to Petersburg 
as soon as they can make some 
needed repairs to the house. 

All of the above sales were ne- 
gotiated through the real estate 
agency of A. B. Renaker and J. G. 
Smith. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, Jan. 23, Bible School at 
.10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
Holy Communion/ will be administ- 
ered at this service. 

The Lutheran men- of Greater 
Cincinnati will meet at First Luth- 
eran Church, Race St. at 12th, 
Cincinnati, on Monday, Jan. 24, at 
8:00 p. m. Rev. Olan Aughbaugh of 
Melbourne, Ky., will be the speaker 
of the evening. All men welcome. 



4-H CLUB LEADERS 

SI IVE MANY YEARS 

Unusual reca Is of men and wo- 
men who have^ served' as leaders 
of 4-H clubs ovef a period of years 
is* reported by jParm Agent J. T. 
Cochran of GaMatin county. Miss 
Mary Turley ojfthe Napoleon Club 
has served for 17 years, while Mrs. 
J. W. Groves of the Drury Chapel 
Club and Mrs. Margaret Gardt of 
the Warsaw cr b have served nine 
years. In the '.teeles Creek Club, 
Mrs. Sile Rydc, has been a club 
leader for elghj£years, Jack Perry, 
nine, Mrs. R. WjSEwbank, five, Mrs. 
William Perry, S, and Jasper Seav- 
er, nine years; Ten othejr leaders 
have served from two to four years. 

Gallatin club members last year 
helped in wartime production of 
hogs, sheep, pc lltry, hybrid corn 
and ! tobacco. [embers of girls' 
clubs conserved food by gardening 
and canning; they also carried a 
clothing projec 

• 



Himiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimm 

New James 



Theatre 



' 



Beginning Sept. 25th One Show 

Each and Every NigKt at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

Wa Time$ 

BARGAIN NIGfeTS MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiimi'iiiii 

BIG DOUILE FEATURE 
PROGRAM 

Mary Lee and John Archer, in 

SHANTY-T9WN 

Plus 
Tim Holt, C iff Edwards, in 



PIRATES OF THE PR ARIE 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 
JANUARY 21 AND 22ND 



Jon Hall, M ria Montez and 
S&tm in 

"WHITE SAVAGE" 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23RD 



Blondie an^ Dagwood, in 

"FOOTLIGHT GL1M0UR" 

Also new serial Chapter No. 1 

DAREDEVILS OF THE WEST" 

Don't miss seeiu? this first chapt- 
er of this thrilling serial. 

MONDAY, JANUARY 24TH 



See the astonishing story of a Nazi 
sky-spy who f" ;w his way right 
into the R. A. '. 
Amazing, Baf i ng, Breathtaking 

Eric PortmalJ, Ann Dvorax, in 

SQUADROI LEADER X 

TUES. & WED., JANU RY 25 & 26 
1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 s 1 1 1 1 i t ; 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 11 11 1 1 1 







REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

Farmers Bank 

Of Petersburg in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 31, 1943. 

' " - ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including $11.25 overdrafts) $ 68,128.90 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 60,300.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 6,840.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures j ' w . . . 7,667.30 

Corpbrate stocks .. . ? 200.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve 

balances, and cash items in process of collection 



Bank premises owned J ..... .* 






';• 






■ • • • ■ 



46,117.27 
900.00 



.$190,153.47 



FLORENCE HOMEMAKERS 

The Florence Homemakers will 
hold their next meeting at the 
Town Hall on Friday, January 21 
at 10:30 a. m. Please answer roll 
call with your 1944 New Year's res- 
olution. 

Mabel G. Sayre, Reporter. 



"Pigs in blankets" combine two 
foods from the basic seven — en- 
riched flour and pork sausage. lioll 
out biscuit dough in thin square, 
then roll a link pork sausage in 
each square and bake. 



TOTAL ASSETS 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations \1 ... ; -. $ 92,056.48 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 51,809.65 
Deposits of United States Government .including 

postal savings)' [ j '.- .4. j 4,805.45 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions , 5,000.00 

TOTAL DEPOSITS ....... J. .... i . . .L. . . '. $153,671.58 

Other liabilities j ;...'.. • Ji 20.00 

TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) . .' .-, $153,691.58 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

..$ 25,000.00 

6,000.00 

5,461.89 

$ 36,461.89 



Capitalt ....'. — 

Surplus 

Undivided profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 



, .. . . 



.... 



J I 



M 

.......... ...... *t. 

1 •'- Mi 

1 7- 



TOTAL LIABnjTHCS AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS* $190,153.47 

tThis bank's capital consists of 250 shares common stock with total par 
value of $25,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value): 

U. S. Government obligationls, direct and guaranteed, . ' 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $ 39,500.00 

Other assets pledged to secure deposits and oth< r k 
liabilities (including notes and bills rediscount6 
and securities sold under repurchase agreement 



6,800.00 



Notice Of Bids 



Notice is hereby given that bids 
will be received by the Board of 
the Hopeful Lutheran Church for 
a Sexton for the Hopeful Lutheran 
Cemetery for the year 1944. 

Bids must be in the hands of H. 
J. Kelly, not later than February 

12, 1944. 

The Council reserves the right to 
reject feny and all bids. 
HOPEFUL LUTHERAN COUNCIL. 



i. \J 1 AL .••••• ••••■■•••*.•■• , 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law 

total : ..; 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was ^. 

Assets reported above which were eligible as.legal 

reserve amounted to 




.$ 46,300.00 



4,617.95 



i 



4,61755 

8,161.37 

46,117.27 

I, J. H. Huey, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solfl^ nly swear- 
affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully arife correctly 
represents the true state of the several matters herein contained and 
set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. ' «• 

J. H. HUEY 
Correct— Attest: J. W. Grant, B. ( H. Berkshire, G. H. ■ jrant^Directors. 
State of Kentucky, i _ 

County of Boone ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 17th day of Jarjuary, 1944, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

O. S. WATTS, Notary Public. 
My commission expires July 1, 1946 f; 



Genealogist Seeks 

Heir To $12,000 Estate 

Chicago, HI., Jan .20— A $12,000 
estate to which he will be the sole 
known heir if found, is hunting for 
Robert von Gundy, 64, who walked 
away from his father's funeral in 
Covington, Ky., in July, 1910, and 
was never heard from again. 

This was revealed, here today 
when "Walter C. Cox, probate gen- 
ealogist, 208 S. LaSalle St., took 
over the direction of the search, on 
behalf of the estate, at the request 
of attorneys. Mr. Cox, who spec- 
ializes in tracing family trees and 
missing relatives to settle estates, 
said that the whereabouts of von 
Gundy appears to be a "perfect 
mystery." 

"There is, of course, the possibil- 
ity that he may have since died, 



would be claimants totthe fortune," 
Mr. Cox said. "While it is said 
that he 'had a girl' when he drop- 



614 Washington St., and giving 
their occupations as traveling 
salesmen. Because the father died 
on July 26, 1910, and other inform- 
ation, there seems to be some 
grounds forthe^Belief that the 
Jacob vD*r"Gundy listed in the 
Washington St. address was Jacob, 
Jr., m brother of Robert. 

"Robert isknown to have attend- 
ed his father's funeral because he 
is shown by records of H. Linne-f 
mann & Moore, now Henry Linne- 
mann & Sons, who conducted it, to 
have rented a conveyance. When 
the funeral was over, Robert was 
seen leaving town, to be heard 
from no more, insofaras we can 
learn. • : 

"What became of Robert's moth- 
er, lis unknown, except for reports 
that she died in Cincinnati, but no 
vital statistics* record of this has 
been found. Robert is known to 



and if so his children, if any; -have had two other brothers, 



Thomas, who died in 1885, and 
Fenton, who died in 1888. Reports 
of a third brother, Jacob, Jr., are 



Try adding cooked buttered 
mushrooms to scrambled eggs. 



ped out of sight, it is not known if not definite and may be errone- 
he ever married. ous." 

"Robert von Gundy was the son 
of Jacob and Stella von Gundy, 
nee Baird, who were, as far as we 
can learn, born in Covington and 
married in that city August 15, 
1878, where Jacob also had a sister, 
or second wife, named Clementine, 
who died in 1911, 

"Robert was born in 1879, when 
he was 13 years old, his father took 
him to Louisville where the latter 
reportedly worked for the street 
car company « until about ' 1909, 
when the two 'returned to Coving- 
ton, and Jacob and Robert von 
Gundy are found listed in the 1910 
Covington city directory as living at 



BOWEL CLEANING POWER 
OF ERB-HELP MEDICINE 

One man recently took ERB- 
HELP three days and said after- 
ward that he never would have 
believed his body contained so 
much filthy substance. He says his 
stomach, intestines, bowels and 
whole system were so thoroughly 
cleansed that his constant head- 
aches came to an end, several pim- 
ply skin eruptions on his face dried 
up overnight, and even the rheu- 
matic pains in his knee disappear- 
ed. At present he is an altogether 
different man, feeling fine in every 
way. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering I Get ERB- 
HELP. Dahlenburg's Drug Store, 
Erianger. 



JANUARY SPECIALS 



3V 2 in. Glazed l„ J. 
Flower Pots 4.5c 

6 oz. China 

Coffee Mugs, 6 for 25c 

Gray Enamel 

Wash Basins s 

2y 2 Quart 

Gray Saucepans 25c 

32-Piece 

Breakfast Sets . 



• ••••••• . £* i/C- 



4 



... 



r 
$2.95 



PAT'S CHINA STORE 



736 MADISON 



COVINGTON 



PAINT VALUES! 
Enamel gallon $1.98 

Quick*-Dry 

Varnish gallon $1.75 

All-Purpose 

House Paint ...gallon $1.69 
Roof Paint gallon $1.59 

Red 

Roof Coating gallon 49c 

(In 5's) 

Aluminum Paint... qt. 1.75 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON <► | COVINGTON 



« 
<1 



WHEN INTOWN BUY AT J. A. BAUMGARTNER 



LOWEST PRICES ON 






RUGS, MATTRESSES and FURNITURE 

COME IN AND SEE 



50-Lb. 

All Cotton 

MATTRESS 

S7.95 

50-Lb. 

All Felt 

MATTRESS 

$10.98 



9x12 Felt Base Rugs $3.50 

12x12 Armstrong Rugs. S3.95 

9x12 32 Oz. Waffle 

Rug Pad ..$5.95 

HEAVY WEIGHT 

GOLD SEAL . . . .* yd. 49c 



Felt 

Day Bed 

MATTRESS 

S8.95 



i 



MAPBLE BABY CRIB 



Baby Crib 
MATTRESS 

$12.98 . $3.98 



Bedroom, Living room, studio couches, chairs, 
rockers, occasional pieces an many odd pieces. 

Don't Forget The Address 
1046 MADISON AT 11TH, COVINGTON, KY. 






WOMEN'S SHOE SALE 

OPA SPECIAL RELEASE 






NO STAMP 



Flattering styles! Your oppor- 
tunity to buy leather-soled shoes, 
ordinarily rationed ... at both a 
great saving in price and without 
a coupon. All sizes, hut not in 
every style. 

■ ■- 






You get more t%r your money when you buy 
"Star Brand, ,, "Poll Parrot," and "Endicott John- 
son" shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 
prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. 



BUY WAR BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLA^GER, -:- KENTUCKY 



\ 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUC 



at 



■ 






4 



Town And Farm In Wartime 



Ration Reminder 

Gasoline — In 17 east coast states 
A-8 coupons are good through 
February 8. In states outside the 
east coast area A-9 coupons are 
good through January 21, and A-10 
coupon become good January 22 
and remain good through March 
21. 

Sugar — Stamp No. 30 in book 
four good for 5 pounds through 
March 31. 

Shoes — Stamp No. 18 in- book 
one is good for 1 pair. Stamp No. 
J on the Airplane sheet in book 
three is good for 1 pair. 

Fuel Oil — Period 2 coupons are 





Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far 
away front— send your smil- 
ing Valentine Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. 

Service Kioto Studio 

804 MADISON, COVINGTON 

Studio Hours: 11 a. m. to 

9 p. m. daily. Sundays 1 to 

5 p. m. 



good through February 7 in all 
areas except the South where they 
are good through January 24. 
Period 3 coupons, now valid in the 
Middle West, East, West and South 
remain good through March 13 in 
the Middle West, East, and Far 
West, and through February 21 in 
the South. 

Meats, Fats— Brown stamps R, S, 
T, and U are good through Janu- 
ary 29. Brown stamp V becomes 
good January 23 and remains good 
through February 26. 

Processed Foods — Green stamps 
D, E, and F in book four are good 
through January 20. Green stamps 
G, H, and J in book four are good 
through February 20. 

Selective Service Changes 

Occupational < deferrments gen- 
erally will be denied 18 to 22-year- 
old registrants other than those in 
agriculture, fathers and non- 
fathers alike, unless they are en- 
gaged in activities in which de- 
fernnent is specifically authorized, 
according to Selective ' Service. 
Furthermore, all registrants will 
be given pre-induction physical 
examination at least 21 days before 
being inducted. Therefore, the 
period ' of three weeks in the en- 
listed reserve now granted by the 
army and the one-week period 
granted by the navy will be elimin- 
ated. These changes become ef- 
fective February 1. » 
Social Security For Farmers 

Social insurance for farm oper- 
ators, farm workers, business and 
professional men, household work- 
ers, and employees of government- 
al and non-profit organizations 
was recommended by the Social 
Security Board in its eighth an- 
nual report. The Board urged in- 
clusion of these groups in an ex- 
panded social security program 
which would include insurance 
against costs of medical and hos- 
pital care without disturbing the 
present principle of free choice in 
seleetion of physicians or hospit- 
als. The Board recommended that 
a comprehensive social insurance 
system should be set up now while 
earnings are "at record levels" In 
order to have it in full operation 
for the postwar period. 
To Stabilize Ration Buying Power 



i\ 



^lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllr 

NO PRIORITIES 

Are Needed For Farm Tools 
To Be Welded 



1/ 



| R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY | 

1 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 

~lllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!llllir- 



^NXNXHXNZMKHZHXHZHXHXNXHXNXNXHXHXNXNZHXHXtlXHXHZHZNXHS 

— - - - 3 

£ 

M 



H 

X 
H 



i 



Wood Sheet Metal Heating Stoves 
Coal Heaters, Oakes and Warm 
•: Morning - also large stock of 
Stove Pipe and Elbows 



j 



4-point 



z 
N 

a 

H 



X 
M 
Z 
M 

m 



39 inches high, 12-inch stay FIELD FENCE and 

Cattle Barb Wire 



John Deere Farm Machinery and DeLaval 
Milkers and- Cream Separators. 



E 



H 
2 
H 



H JJ 

I The Jansen Hardware Co. | 

M X 

■ CO. 0910 108-110 PIKE ST. COVINGTON, KY. g 

Shxiixhxhxhxhxmxhxmxhxhxhxhxmxnxhxmxhxhxhxhzhzhzhzhxn9 



Under the new ration token 
plan effective February 27, the 
housewife will be able to buy about 
the same amount of rationed pro- 
cessed foods and meats-fats as she 
can now. Point values will be ad- 
justed so the individual's allotment 
of 60 points for buying meats and 
fats will, buy the same amount as 
the^present allotment of approx- 
imately 64 points. Similarly, under 
the token plan the 50-point allot- 
ment for processed foods will buy 
an amount equal to the present 48- 
point allotment. 

Pre-War Baby Carriages Back 

Pre-war model baby carriages, 
strollers, walkers, and pushcarts 
will re-appear on the market in 
about six weeks, according to WPB. 
Greater availability of steel makes 
possible the production of these 
pre-war models. 

Asks Farmers' Help In Woods 

To mobilize farmers on farm 
woodlands and for work in forest 
industries, the War Production 
Board, War Food Administration, 
and -War Manpower Commission 
have combined forces. Farfners 
and farm workers are asked to de 
vote their spare time, particularly 
during the slack winter-spring 
period, to work in the woods and 
wood industries. Production of 14 
million cords of domestic pulpwood 
will be necessary in 1944 to supply 
the needs of our alfned forces over 
seas and meet essential home front 
ware requirements.Xaccording to 
WPB's pa^fej^division. Farmers 
have nearly 139 million acres of 
farm woods which annually pro- 
duce about one-third of all forest 
products and 38 per cent of the 
country's pulpwood. 

More Food For School Lunches 

America's school children have 
been assured by the Office of Price 
Administration ■ more generous 
amounts of food for lunchroom 
and cafeteria meals under a new 
plan for providing rationed foods 
to schools. The new allotments 
were worked out by OPA in close 
cooperation with school lunch and 
nutrition experts of the Food Dis- 
tribution Administration. The 
Government school lunch pro- 
gram, which went into effect, one 
year ago, is a wartime measure to 
make sure that school children will 
have a well-planned and nutrition- 
ally appropriate noon meal. 
Advice For Soldiers Overseas 

When writing to soldiers over- 
seas, particularly those in the 
tropics, home folks may help con- 
tribute to their health, says the 
War Department, by reminding 
those overseas men of the neces- 
sity of following the advice of their 
medical officers. 

Tractor Production Up 

Production of wheeled tractors in 
December was the largest for any 
month in two years — in excess of 
20,000 as compared with 4,200 in 
December, 1942. .However, accord- 
ing to the fWPB, the curernt rate 
of production must be maintained 
in order to meet the tractor quota 
of 209,000 for the 12 months that 
will end June 30. This will not be 
easy because many of the parts 
needed for tractor production are 
also used in landing craft, now in 
urgent demand by the armed ser- 
vices. 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, Jan.. 23, Bible School -at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Woodford Crigler, 
Supt. 

The Church Council will hold 
their regular business meeting, at 
the church this Thursday, Jan. 20, 
at 8^00 p. m. 

The Lutheran men of Greater 
Cincinnati will meet at First Luth- 
eran Church, Race St., at 12, Cin- 
cinnati, on Monday, Jan. 24, at 8 
p. m. Pastor Olan Aughbaugh will 
speak on "Missions from a Man's 
Standpoint." May we have a good 
representation. 



1 '•-. 



DO YOUR FEET BOTHER YOU, 

FOOT SUFFERERS? 

Why Hobble about when you can be spry and happy? Bring your burden 
of foot troubles to us where thousands have been helped. You get expert 
advice, a series of electric manipulations and hand massages and you only 
pay for your prescription shoes, THAT'S ALL! 



FREE 

Electric Oscilating 
Treatments 



FREE 

Foot analysis. Get to 
the bottom of your 
Foot Troubles. 



N. TDLCH 

FOOT COMFORT 
SPECIALIST ] 

Associates — D. E. Witzleben 
C. Kenenth Kruse 



PEOPLE'S 

SHOE STORE 

"Where Foot Comfort Begins" 

814-816 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 



imimiiiiiiiinniiiiimitiiiimniriiiimmi 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiii 

Cpl. Samuel B. Walton, 1505- 
5359, H. T. Co. 10th Inf. U. S. Army 
APO 5, care Postmaster, New York, 
N. W., writes he is in Northern 
Ireland and likes the country and 
people fine. He says "hello" to all 

his friends back. 

* » * 

Pvt William R. Walton 35128173 
Serv. Btry 56th F. A. Bn., APO 118 
care Postmaster, New York, N. Y.,| 
writes in a letter dated Xirias Day 
that he is in Northern Ireland, but 
as yet had not got in touch with 
his brother Samuel B. He states 
that he likes the country fine and 
hopes to see his brother in the near 
future as it has been 2V 2 years 
since he has seen him. He sends 
his regards to all his friends back 
home. 

* * • 

Londonderry (delayed) — Marine 
Sergeant Richard L. Jones, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Jones, Verona, 
Ky., has been promoted to that 
rank from Corporal. 

He attended Simon Kenton High 
School at Independence, Ky., grad- 
uating in the class of 1938, and 
then attended the Covington Com- 
mercial College in Covington, Ky., 
before entering the employ of F. 
W. Woolworth in Covington. 

He left a position there as as- 
sistant manager to join the Mar- 
ines in January, 1942. He was on 
guard duty for a short time after 
coming to this- base. 

Sergeant Jones has two brothers 
in the service, Raymond W. and 

Carl, both in the Marine Corps. 

* • • 

Clyde E. King, "Barbel" Detail 
Box 61, U. S. Submarine Base, New 
London, Conn., writes: 

"I have just finished reading the 
paper I received today. Since I 
have written to you last, I have 
been transferred to brand new sub- 
marine that is just about complet- 
ed here at the Electric Boat Co. at 
New London, Conn. It's name is 
"Barbel" and will be commissioned 
March 16, 1944. 

"I have been receiving your 
paper for quite a few months now 
and we will be sent to a Submarine 
base in the Southwest Pacific soon! 
I will send sufficient funds so that 
I may still receive this paper over 
there. 

"As you probably already know, 
the patrols that we make are long 
and tiresome. During a three- 
month patrol, a fellow- could read 
everything and of course, he would 
like to have something that he 
knows. We don't get any mail 
while we are out on patrol, so we 
really have piles of letters waiting 
for us! 

"I am expecting to be home on 
leave before the first of March as 
the Captain of our submarine is 
trying to give the entire crew leave 
before leaving port. So I will stop 
in personally and thank you again 
for sending the paper." 

Ed Note — Clyde, there will be no 
charge for your paper, regardless 
of where you may be stationed — it 

will follow you there, without cost. 

* * • 

Sheppard Field, Texas — Pfc. Lee 
R. McNeely, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee R. McNeely, Burlington 
R. 2, has graduated from an in- 
tensive course in airplane mech- 
anics and now is prepared to join 
the ranks of "coverall commandos" 
who keep our American planes 
aloft. Sheppard Field, near Wich- 
ita Falls, Texas, is one of the 
largest schools of the Army An: 
Forces Technical Training Oon\- 
mand, training specialist technic- 
ians for the ground crews which 
"Keep 'Em Flying." 

Before entering the school, he 
was trained at one of the basic 
training centers of the Army Air 
Forces Technical Training Com- 
mand, Gulfport Field, Miss. 




ERLANGfiR, ELSMERE, KY 
FREE PARKING LOT 
SHOW TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:* and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shew I 6: Of 7:45, 9:30 p. m. 

Sunday 3 show 6:00,7:45,9:30 

Sunday Matii te 2:30 p. m. 

V 



TONIGHT znd FRIDAY 

JANUARYS 80 AND 21 



s een's greatest 
omedy team I 



HEBRON 



Pfc. Edwin Walton is home on 
a furlough from Tulsa, Okla. 

Pvt. Weston Rogers was home 
from Richmond, over, the week- 
end. 

Pvt. Elmer S. Dickey of Ft. 
Thomas was called here over the 
week-end due to the illness of his 
father-in-law Ed Baker, who has 
been very ill of flu. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Baker, of 
Bromley called on Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Baker, Sunday afternoon. 

Terrill Riley, of Lexington spent 
Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Riley. 

Mrs. Lee Craddock entertained 
the Homemakers, Wednesday. 

After a 14-day furlough Sgt. 
James Watts returned to Camp 
Maxey, Texas, Saturday. 

Mrs. Jerry Fowler entertained 
the Bullittsville Missionary Society 
at her, home, Saturday. 

Miss Helen Anderson spent Fri- 
day night with Miss Marilyn Gar- 
nett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Goodridge 
entertained with a 6 o'clock din- 
ner Tuesday evening in honor of 
Sgt. James .Watts. Other guests 
were Mrs. Ida Watts and daugh- 
ter Dorothy, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Schwab, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Good- 
ridge, Mrs. Hallie Herbstreit and 
son. 




Our beys must keep on 
ing — we must keep en bay- 
ing WAR BONDS until vic- 
tory is won. Keep on BACK- 
ING THE ATTACK. 



i 




Dona Drake-Cully Richards 

Eve Ante • ZaSu Pitts 

l ariorie Weav ■ Raymond Walbun 

SAT^IDAY 




ioi sou* L tw sous or tsi pionhrs 4 
•.-Hi Roth TERRY PAumtiiY 
"Batman" No. 9 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

JANUARY 23 AND 24TH 



THEIR 
BEST 
YET! 




TOMMY DORSEY J5S&, 

GIL STRATT0H • ROBERT E. STRICKLAND 

"RAGS" RAGLAHD • JUNE ALLYS0M 

NANCY WAL ER • BUY K1BBEE 






UNION 






Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Rachal were 
out from Cincinnati Thursday for 
the day with Mrs. Maud N. Rachal. 

Mr. and Mrs. Surface Barlow en- 
tertained a group of r^tives at 
dinner Wednesday night, compli- 
meting the birthday anniversary of 
their mother, Mrs. Leslie R. Bar- 
low;. 

Miss Sallie Blair Huey's friends 
are glad to see her out again, fol- 
lowing ten days' attack of flu. 

The Young Women's Auxiliary of 
the Baptist Church met Wednes- 
day night in the church building 
following the m d-week prayer ser- 
vice. This rejpMar monthly meet- 
ing was presided over by the pres- 
ident, Mrs. Preston Hedges. 

Mrs. Lora Mullins came in from 
St. Elizabeth Hospital Wednesday, 
where she had been a patient for 
a short time. 

Mrs. Clifford Bruner and small 
daughter of Columbus, Ohio, were 
guests Saturday afternoon of Miss 
Nannie P. Burkett. 

Pvt. Russell Doane left Thurs- 
day for California, following a two 
weeks' furlough with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. W H. Doane. 

Mr. William Satherland, a form- 
er resident of the community, was 
buried Saturday afternoon in the 
Rice Cemetery. Mr. Sutherland 
died Wednesday at his home in 
Erlanger, following a lingering ill- 
ness. 

Mrs. Elmer Noe and children and 
Mrs. James Thornton Bristow spent 
Friday in Erlanger with their kins- 
woman, Mrs. Harold Weaver. 

Mrs. Delia May Clements and 
Mrs. Tom Robert Huey were in Cin- 
cinnati, Saturday to attend a mat- 
inee performance of Franz Schu- 
bert's beautiful operetta "Blossom 
Time." 

Mrs. Winston Mason, president, 
presided at the regular monthly 
meeting of the W. M. U. Wednes- 
day afternoon at the Baptist 
Church. 

Capt. George R. Coe, who is here 
from Randolph Field, Texas for a 
visit with relatives in Erlanger, 
spent Friday afternoon with his 
friends the Raymond K. Newmans. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gepford and 
son, of Cincinnati were dinner 
guests Saturday night of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. H. Bristow at their home 
on Big Bone Road. 

Miss Kathleen Liggett was out 
from Cincinnati for the week-end 
with her mother, Mrs. Bess Lig- 
gett. 

Mrs. Mary Grater, Miss Jane 
Shelton Bristow, Mrs. Tom Robert 
Huey and Roy Butler, Jr., attended ; 



the morning service at Richwood 
Church, Sunday. 

— 'i 

HOMEMAKERS MARKET 

DOES BIG BUSINESS 

A farm women's market in Bar- 
ren county brought $4,358 to its 
five contributors in 1943, an in- 
crease of $2,173 over the . preced- 
ing year. Largest sale days were 
in May. and December, when $232.69 
and $480.65 respectively were tak- 
en in. 

A total of approximately $1,100 
was made by Mrs. Clem Davidson, 
who used her earnings to pay the 
high school expenses and music 
lessons of her daughter, and to buy 
war bonds. Mrs. Ehvin Bordon re- 
ported to the home, agent "that she 
purchased an electric brooder and 
200 chickens, and did a consider- 
able amount of home decoration 
besides other expenditures. War 
bonds, church dues and furniture 
were some of the uses- to which 
Mrs. Shelby Riherd put her earn- 
ings. All bf the women agreed that 
besides being remunerative the 
work was enjoyable. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

" Phone HE. 2088 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 

Features Shoppers' 

Lunch 

A special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 25c 
should be of special interest 
to Boone County shoppers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE. 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 

BABY CHICKS 

We Sell DR. SALISBURY'S Poultry Remedies, 
Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

512 Pike St. ^ ■ ^j|j|y^^j HEmlock 9168 

Covington irrnt^SrnTn Open Sundays Till Noon 



NEW 



DIXIE BRAND 






TUES., an* WEDNESDAY 



V 



V 



£> 



*s» 



mm 



Hai nti DUAPMA'N • ! - FliPHlNUN 



SEEDS 



SOLD ONLY AT HILL'S 



High in germination and purity . . . 
best all-around results assured. We 
advise you to bay them at your 
earliest convenience . . . begin now 
to make 1944 the biggest year you 
ever had . . . it's up to you! 



T?-- 



Same high quality since 1863 



For your convenience this 
Theater sells WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 
box office. 



CEORCEW, 



Since 1863 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-26 W. 
SEVENTH ST. 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 
I SINCE 1863 



■ 



i 



i 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 










THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

\ ' ■ I 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY 17, 1924 



Petersburg 

Earl Smith and wife, of Burling- 
ton, spent last Sunday here with 
her sister, Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Stephens. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Keim gave a 
six -o'clock dinner in honor §f then- 
son, Weindel and Corel Keim and 
two of their girl friends, Miss 
Francis V. Berkshire and Miss 
Gene Miller. 

Pt. Pleasant 

Mrs. Emery Smith and son, Miles 
Alden, spent Saturday and Sun- 
day in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Hollis and 
son Roger Layman, spent last 
Sunday with Mrs. Sallie Souther 
and son, Gordon. 

Gunpowder 

P. J. Allen and wife, of near 
Point Pleasant, broke bread with 
her parents, last Sunday. 

Mrs. Sam Cummins spent Satur- 
day night and Sunday with Cov- 
ington friends. . 

Constance 

Harry Klasserner of Welch, Va., 
was the guest of his parents, here 
New. Year's week. . 

It is reported that Serman 
Peeno, son of James Peeno, and 
Irene Arnold, daughter of Walter 
Arnold, of near Burlington, are 
married. 

Hume 

Katie and Howard Stahl spent 
several days last week with Mary 
Allphin. 

Harvey Scott, of Covington, is 
visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Scott. 

Hopeful 

Lula and Thelma little daughters 
of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Robbins 
have whooping cough. 

Mrs. Howard Kelly had as her 
guest one day last week, Mrs. Jas. 
Kelly, of Burlington. 
Hebron 

Mr. and Mrs. Liston Hempfling 
and son were guests of her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. William McGlasson, 
last Sunday. 

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen Goodridge, who has been sick 
for several weeks, continues about 
the same. 

Taylorsport 

Mrs. Anna Goodridge is the guest 
of her son and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lehman Goodridge. 

Mrs. Walter Sprague spent 




WATCH THAT BALL! 

Von will enjoy football more fully . . . 
even though yon do not get seats on 
the 60-yard line . . . with Glasses we 
fit to your optical needs. Ton will 
see things more quickly, clearly, 
wherever yon may be; and morel 

DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OFFICES WITH 



MOTCH 

Opticians — Jewelers 

613-15 Madison. Ave., Covington 
SINCE 1857 



Wednesday with her mpther, Mrs. 
Jennie Brose, of Riverside. 
Verona 

Clifford Myers, Who has a posi- 
tion in Covington, visited his 
parents last Sunday. 

O. K. Whitson and wife are 
spending several weeks with their 
daughter, Mrs. Blanche Coffman, 
of Walton. 

Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. Timothy Westbay, of Cov- 
ington and W. R. Rogers and sis- 
ters, of Burlington, spent Sunday 
with M. G. Martin and wife, of 
Florence. 

Charles Beall, Jr., spent last 
Sunday afternoon with Bug Ogden 
and family of near Limaburg. 
Idlewild 

Mrs. Anna Barnett, of Lawrence- 
burg recently presented her small 
granddaughter, Anna Lucille Grant 
with a piano. 

Forest Krutz, of Petersburg, will 
clerk for L. C. Scothorn this year. 
Big Bone 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Baker on the eleventh, a girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Jones, Mr. 
and Mrs. M. C. Carroll and James 
Jones spent Sunday with Chris- 
tena Jones, of Covington. 
Limaburg 

Mrs. Stella Waters spent Monday 
afternoon with Mrs. Lizzie Rouse. 

Mrs. C. E. Beemon had as guests 
last Thursday, Misses Hettie Rouse 
and Ada Aylor, of Florence, and 
Mrs. Grace Carpenter and daugh- 
ter, of Cincinnati. 

Rabbit Hash 

Herman Ryle and wife are 
operating the switch board at this 
place. 

Solon Ryle and wife are enter- 
taining a nine-pound boy since 
January 11th. 

Beaver Lick 

Mr. and Mrs. John Delahunty 
spent last Saturday in the city. 

Miss Sarah Hughes and Miss 
Kate Sleet are at Enterprise, Fla. 
■ Devon 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Perry, of 
Covington, were guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Morton Perry and family, 
Saturday night and Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Bassett, Wednesday. 

Burlington 

Miss Pink Cowen was confined 
to her bed several days last week 
with grippe. 

Mrs. Lavina Kirkpatrick has 
been on the sick list for several 
days. > 



The Nails 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



HO-HUMMM! 

What This Place 
Needs, Folks, Is 
A Few Good 
Ads In This 

NEWSPAPER 





N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist 

PEOPLED SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



The nail, like the hair, is a spec- 
ialized epidermal structure. It is 
composed of two layers, the muc- 
ous or the soft layers, £hd tig 
horny which constitues the nl 
proper. The nail bed is the tissue 
covered by the nail. The poster- 
ior end of this is the matrix from 
which the nail grows. The exposed 
portion of the nail is termed the 
body and the posterior portion 
embedded in the groove is the 



root. Accidental white spots on 
the nail are due to the presence 
of air between the lamellae. 

Ingrown nails is a condition in 
which the free edge of a nail has 
penetrated through the skin layers 
and become imbedded in the soft 
parts of the toe. 

In 98% of the cases shoes are 
the cause. HOw often have you put 
shoes on in a store (that knows 
nothing about feet) that are long 
enough when you are sitting down, 
and the minute you stand up they 
are short. It is an absolute im- 
possibility to fit feet unless you 
can control feet with the shoes 
you are being fitted in. This is 
important. The foot must be lock- 
ed at the arch so as to hold the 
foot back against the heel 'so that 
the shoe that gives you % of an 
inch clearance when selling does 
not get short when you stand up. 

Adv. 



SOIL *. DSION 




Hillside planted 
Grass should be 
falfa to prevent 

Soil erosion co 
the greatest of 
often thought th 



< alfalfa alone. 

[anted with al- 

osion. 
ues, even with 
e. We have 
ur soil erosion 



PRICE PIKE 



Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gross had as 
their guests last Sunday, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Feldon, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Jesse Jackson, of Sadieville, O. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lon Stein called 
on Wm. Gross and wife. 

Mrs. Gertie Howe is visiting her 
husband in Camp Lawton, Okla. 

Charles House is on the sick list. 

Mrs. Sterling Rouse is on the sick 
list, but is somewhat improved. 

Claud Addison killed hogs last 
week. 



Try A Want Ad— They SeU 



problems were ove# when we sow- 
ed our fields to alfalfa or grass. 
The above field was sown to alfalfa 
alone and note the severe gullying. 

It is a good prac ice when sowing 
alfalfa or any oth r grasses to sow 
a mixture of leg\ ties and peren- 
nial grasses, 1. e., i falfa and orch- 
ard grass, alfalfa find timothy or 
bluegrass. One of Jtie best combin- 
ations is alfalfa and orchard grass. 
One of the best wais to get a blue- 
grass sod is to sow bluegrass with 
alfalfa. Of cours||alfalfa will not 
grow if the land isn't sweet. Lime 
and phosphate are very essential. 

The effectiveness of grass in 
preventing erosion is shown by an 
experiment carried on at the Mis- 
souri Experiment station over' a 
fourteen-year period. The field 
had a 3.68 foot fall per 100 feet. 
From data^ompiled it would take 
3043 years Tor 'he soil to erode, 7 
inches where a bluegrass sod was 

_fc 



established, but only 56 years if 
cultivated to continuous corn. In 
other words corn ground will erode 
or wash away 60 times faster than 
sod land. Taking into considera- 
tion (1) the labor involved to 
plow, cultivate and harvest a corn 
crop; (2) the cost of restablish- 
ing a sod; (3) the greater amount 
of soil lost by erosion; (4) the 
actual value of corn harvested 
compared to the grazing value or 
hay crop; (5) also corn is more apt 
to be sold as corn or in animals 
than grass or hay. Can we afford 
to grow corn in Boone County? 
For this week's problem, figure 
out what you would have to get per 
bushel for your corn that would 
justify you to plow up^a good sod. 
Isn't it about time to cast aside 
the plow with the shovel and the 
hoe and pick up the mowing ma- 
chine with the fiddle and the bow? 
More harmony. 

J. Casper Acree. 



GIVE HER . . . 

a permanent entitling her to » 
lovely natural looking curls! 
Priced to fit any pocketbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious cold wave. 

Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
, Open Evenings 



PRINT 1000 ENVELOPES 
Like Last Time. 
■■ Got A Sample? 
FINE! 




Phone Us for Your 
PRINTING 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 




.1 



All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

CARDOSI 

Rear 24 East Fifth St. 
COVINGTON 

Phone Hemlock 8689 
Residence Phone Florence 386 





Zon't- 



• NEGLECT YOUR PROPERTY 

MAKE REPAIRS -A/oka I 

See Us About a New Reel 

or Needed Roof Repairs 

Yon can't afford to lot your homo depredate lor m ii of • 
dependable, weather-tight roof. Wo are roofing speciaiista, 
prepared to give you prompt service — to use the biggest-value 
roofings money can buy— CAREY Asphalt Shingles. You* 
choice of beautiful, non-fading colors. We handle all details. 
No red tape. Cell, or come in and see us today. 

Jt Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 
oone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 



L affl kl JfflL 



STANDARD FOR OVER 60 YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



/- 




Every patriotic home in America will want 

■ to put up this emblem! 



THIS emblem is a symbol of your patriotism. It tells the 
world that you have done your full share in the 4th 
War Loan. Every true American will be proud to display 
It at home. 

Our valiant fighting men . . . soldiers, sailoi and marines 
... on every far-flung battlefront are on f s attack . . . 
forging ahead steadily, relentlessly. Nothin pn earth can 
•top them ... if we back them up! :*J- 

Backing them up means throwing every abllar we can 
possibly spare into the .fight right now . . e$?n if it takes 
sacrifice on our part. 

That's the purpose of this 4th War Loan Drive. 

To earn the right to display the 4th War Loan Emblem 
you must invest in at least one extra hundred dollar Bond 
(at a cost of only $75) . . . over and above your regular 









War Bond subscription. But don't stop w.ith one! Invest 
in all the extra Bonds you think you can afford . . . then 
invest in some more ! 

Remember, every dollar you put into War Bpnds does 
double duty. It helps to win the war . . . and at the same 
time it insures your own financial security. 

Here, too, is a chance to help your company meet its 
quota in this 4th War Loan. 

Maybe this will mean sacrifice on your part. Maybe it 
will mean doing without something you want. But don't 
forget . . . while you are only lending a few spare dollars . . . 
thousands of our gallant fighting men are giving their lives 
for you! Show that you're backing them up 100%. Invest 
in extra War Bonds to the limit of your ability. And dis- 
play the 4th War Loan Emblem at home! 



. 






BUILD YOUR FUTUfeE \ /ITH THE WORLD'S SAFEST INVESTMENT 



All over the country men and women look 
to the future with confidence. They are the 
ones who have put part of their extra war- 
time earnings into the . world's safest in- 
vestment — U. S. Government War Bowl . 
Yea, they are helping their country in igt 
grimmest straggle. But they are helping 



themselves, too! They are helping to 
secure their future, to weather any troubled 
dM that may lie ahead. 

What about youf Are you letting the 
dollars slip through your fingers— dollars 
that should he put safely away in War 
Bonds? 



There arc War Bonds to fit your needs 
. . . Bonds hacked up by the strongest 
"company" in the world. Build that home 
you have always dreamed about. Send your 
child to college. Buy the wonderful things 
that are coming after the war. YOU CAN DO 

)T WITH "YOUR WAS BOND SAVINGS. 



I 






V 



&#M BACK TH E ATTACK 




This Advertisement Sponsored by She following Patriotic Concerns 



PEOPLES DEPOSIT BANK, Burlington, Ky. 

DIXIE STATE BANK, Walton, Ky. 

HEBRON DEPOSIT BANK, Hebron, Ky. 

FLORENCE DEPOSIT BANK, Florence, Ky. 



* 



UNION DEPOSIT BANK, Union, ,Ky. 

CITIZENS DEPOSIT BANK, Grants Ky. 

VERONA DEPOSIT BANK, Verona, Ky. 

FARMERS BANK, Petersburg, Ky. 



MMsaW. 



&?, ■ \_-. .•; > j. 



2 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 20, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






llllUllllllimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllll 

AT TBBh— — - 

Gayety Theatre 
1 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ti 1 1 1 1 ■ i ■"■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



SATURDAY 

"Man From Music Mountain" is 
the title of the latest Republic 
picture starring Roy Rogers, which 
will be shown at the Gayety, Sat- 
urday. 

Supporting Rogers is a big cast, 
including Ruth Terry, The Sons Of 
The Pioneers, Pat Brady, and Paul 
Kelly, and the picture was directed 
by Joe Kane. 

Once again, his many fans will 
have the opportunity of seeing 
"Trigger," Rogers' wonderful Pal- 
omino horse, who is so intelligent 
that spoken directions are hardly 
necessary. He can perform more 
than fifty tricks perfectly. 



^ 



■ 



M 



V 






SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

In addition to their singing and 
famed . impersonations, Mickey 
Rooney and Judy Garland dance 
their most extensive routines yet in 
M-GtM's Tilmization of the Gersh- 
win Broadway hit of a few seasons 
ago, "Girl Crazy." Judy sings and 
dances the lovely melody, "Em- 
braceable You," and teams with 
Mickey in the finale number to 
dance and sing "I Got Rhythm." 
' . In addition Mickey does two nov- 
elty numbers, "Treat Me Right," 
with June Allyson, and "Can You 
Use Me?" with Judy. Tommy Dor- 
sey and his band supply the music- 
al background. Also in the cast are 
Nancy Walker, Gil Stratton, Robert 
E; Strickland, "Rags" Ragland, 
Prances Rafferty and Guy Kibbee. 
• * * 

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY 

Edward G. Robinson, star of 
Columbia's "Destroyer," coming to 
the Gayety, should act like a dyed- 
in-the-wool Chief Boatswain's 
Mate in this new picture. His per- 
sonal technical adviser, who spent 
some time putting him through the 
paces, was Chief Boatswain's Mate 
Joe Kavel, who has 23 years of 
Navy service to his credit. 

He was Chief on the USS West 
Virginia when it ' went down at 
Pearl Harbor, and since then he 
has taken part in the naval attacks 
on Gilbert and Marshall Islands, 
Wake and Marcus Islands. Robin- 
son patterned his characterization 
after Kavel. K '. • t< • 



HEBRON^UTHERAN LEAGUE 

The Hebron Lutheran League 
had its second meeting on Wed- 
nesday 8:00 p. m. at the Hebron 
Lutheran Church in the Sunday 
School room. 

There were eleven present. The 
elections w< *e made as follows: 
President, ^.Barney Hogan; vice 
president^enry Mikkelsen; treas- 
uVer, Donald Conrad; secretary, 
Shirley Mikkelse 

The next meeting will be held 
at the sam^place and time on 
Wednesday; February 16. 1944. All 
young people^ are cordially invited 
to attend. 

Sh^J^lMTkKelsen, Sec'y. 




— *r 
CONSTANCE HOMEMAKERS 

The Constance Homemakers met 
at the home of Mrs. Lena Fritz 
January 5, There were eleven 
members and our H. D. A. present. 
In the absen e of the secretary and 
treasurer, M S. George Kottmyer 
Was appoirqgd temporary secre- 
tary-treasurer* 

In the afternoon Miss Gillaspie 
give the lesson on "Mending, 
Patching and Darning." 

The door prize was won by Mrs. 
George Heist. 

Next meeting will be held Feb. 
2, at the home of Mrs. Grace Dol- 
wick. Roll call to be answered, 
"Something about Lincoln." Each 
member asked to bring one or two 
points for meat at each meeting.. 
Next month's lesson will be on 
"Household Pests." 

— Secretary-Treasurer. 



Left-over fat may be used again 
in piecrust, cakes, waffles, bis- 
cuits, muffins, or stuffing. 



PETERSBURG HOMEMAKERS 

The Homemakers' Club met on 
January 13th at the home of Mrs. 
frankie Chambers. The meeting 
was opened by the president, Miss 
Gladys Klopp. 

After the business meeting Mrs. 
Mathews read an interesting pap- 
er on the main cities of Italy. 

Miss Gladys Klopp gave a good 
report on the Advisory Council 
meeting held at Burlingttm. 

The Club vrted to have a paper 
drive which ^ill be January 19th. 
The truck will gather all the paper 
and take it to the school building. 

Miss Gillaspie gave the lesson on 
"Patching and Mending." 

After the lesson the ladies work- 
ed on the afghan for the Red 
Cross. The club hopes to have two 
more afghans ready to turn in 
soon. 

The next meeting will be Febru- 
ary 10th.. 

— Leona Klopp, Reporter. 



i 



i v 



, 



MITH'S GROCERY 

m 
We Deliver— Phone 74 

JRL1NGTON, >:• KENTUCKY 



S TAPIOCA • • P* r box ^ 

per dozen 40c 

.per doz. 30c 

per pound 10c 



ORANGES 

TANGERINES 

APPLES, cooking or eating, . . 

PDLLSBURY PANCAKE FLOUR P er box 1Zc 

LOG CABIN MAPLE SYRUP P er bottle Z * c 

MOTHER'S OATS, quick and regular .... ...small 12c 

WILSON'S MILK, tall cann 1 point ™ c 

WHOLE KERNEL CORN, No. 2 can .13 points 15c 

MUSTARD GREENS, No. 2 can $&' ' 6 ^°| nts 14c 

TURNIP GREENS, No. 2 can, \f 6 points 14c 

NOODLES, large bag ; if 18c 

KALE f* lb - JJ" 

KRAUT, bulk P" lb - 10c 



GRAIN HOMINY 

PORK CHOPS . . . 
JOWL BACON . . 
ROUND STEAK . 




.,.*»•• 



. .per lb. 6c 
.per lb. 37c 
per lb. 20c 
per lb. 44c 



By A. M. Yealey 

The writer has been requested to 
state in his articles the cost of a 
Negro slave prior to the Civil War. 
This would be a difficult task as 
the price of a slave varied accord- 
ing to the laws that were passed by 
the U. S. Government and also the 
State Government. 

On February 3rd, 1849 the House 
of Representatives of Kentucky 
passed this resolution by a vote of 
93 to 0: "Resolved. That we the 
Representatives of the people of 
Kentucky are opposed to aboltion 
or emancipation of slavery in any 
form or shape, whatsoever, except 
as now provided for by the Con- 
stitution and By-Laws of the 
State." 

Previous to 1833 there was a law 
in Kentucky that prohibited any 
persons- from purchasing and 
bringing into the state slaves for 
their own use. This law was 
amended in 1849 so you could pur- 
chase and bring into the . state 
slaves for your own use. 

In 1845 Calvin Fairbanks and 
Delia A. Webster from Vermont 
were encouraging the slaves in 
Kentucky to leave their owner. 
Many became restless and attempt- 
ed escape. On Sept. 27, 1853 there 
was a stampede of slaves over the 
Ohio River, 32 from Mason and 
Bracken county, 9 from Campbell 
and 14 from Boone county. These 
escapes had a tendency to -reduce 
the cost of a slave. 

On January 8, 1855, seven slaves 
were sold to settle the estates of 
persons who were deceased, and 
the lowest price paid for a slave 
was $1,015 and the highest 'price 
paid was $1,505. 

On April 12, 1862, the U. S. Con- 
gress abolished slavery in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and appropriat- 
ed $100,000 to colonize any liber- 
ated slaves who wished to leave 
the U. S. and $1,000,000, out of 
which to pay a loyal owner $300 
for each slave if applied for in 90 
days. The U. S. Congress here set 
the price as we find on May 5, 
at a sale of eleven slaves at Rich- 
mond, Ky. The lowest price was 
$140 per slave and highest price 
$388 and the average was $246. 

We hereby give you the sale of a 
slave woman that was sold at Gun- 
powder, Boone County 1839. Copy 
of the sale: 

"December 30th, 1839, we have 
this day sold to Jacob Crigler a 
Negro woman' named Tinie which 
we warrant to be sound in body 
and mind and the title goes to 
you under, our hands this 30th day 
of December 1839. 

Joseph Kendrick, 
Jacob Clarkson." 
' Although the price paid for Tinie 
was not stipulated in the above 
sale, the writer has other papers 
of Mr. Crigler's in his possession 
that leads him to believe the price 
paid was $180. Mr. Crigler was a 
good business man and perhaps he 
did not care to pay in order that 
he might find out for himself 
whether or not Tinie was sound in 
body and mind. 

So we see that the passage of 
laws by Congress and state had 
much to do in the price of slaves. 



i 

* 



OPA RELEASE OF 
WOMEN'S FOOTWEAR 

A , • \ 



DAILY PROOF YOU DO SAVE HERE 



Odds and ends, 
all sizes in the 
group but not in 
every style. 




•Real Leather Soles 

• Gabardine Uppers . 

• Leather Uppers 



No Lay-Aways 
No Exchanges 
Every Sale Final 



• Low Heels 

• Medium Heels 
•High Heels 



NO RATION STAMPS NEEDED , 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 

627 Madison Avenue Covington CO. 1430 



SECTioN TO DISCUSS 

POST-WAR PLANNING 



A forum to discuss the subject, 
"What Should We Plan for When 
Peace Comes?" will be part of the 
program at the rural church and 
rural community session at the 
annual Farm and Home Conven- 
tion at the University of Kentucky 
Jan. 25-28. 

The rural church will be repre- 
sented by the Rev. W. J. Clarke of 
Sparta, Ky.; business and indus- 
try by Washington Reed of Lex- 
ington, chairman of the commit- 
tee on economic improvement for 
the eastern district of Kentucky; 
agriculture and the rural commu- 
nity by J. E. Standford of Louis- 
ville, executive secretary of the 
Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation 
and education by Dr. H. L. Dono- 
van, president of the University of 
Kentucky. 

Another speaker at the rural 
church and rural community ses- 
sion will be Miss Flora Dodson of 
Louisville, whose subject will be, 
"My Experience in a Japanese Con- 
centration Camp." 

The Kentucky Rural Church 
Council will meet during the con- 
vention. 

Farm women and members of 
homemakers'-clubs will hold meet- 
ings throughout the four days of 
the convention. Among the speak- 
ers will be Mrs. Chu Shih-ming, 
wife of an official in the Chinese 
legation in- Washington, and Miss 
Dodson. 

Farmers will attend general 
sessions for two days and then 
divide into groups to discuss soils 
and crops, livestock raising, dairy- 
ing, poultry keeping, improved 
seeds, and food production. 

BIG LEAF YIELD 

From 12 acres of Ky. 16 burley 
tobacco Autrey Janes of Adair 
county sold 2,170 pounds of leaf 
for $1,127.98. Manure was spread 
on the land and vetch turned 
under the first week in May. After 
breaking, 600 pounds of 20 per- 
cent superphosphate to the acre 
was worked into the soil, and 350 
pounds of complete fertilizer was 
applied along the rows before set- 
ting. 



More Shells For 

1944 Seem Likely 

Frankfort, Ky.— News of the 
shotgun shell situation and hope 
for a decided improvement during 
the coming 12 months was con- 
tained in a letter received recent- 
ly by S. A. Wakefield, Director of 
the Division of Game and Fish, 
from Virgil Chapman, Congress- 
man from the Sixth Kentucky Dis- 
trict, who is a member of the 
House Select Committee on Con- 
servation of Wildlife Resources. 

Mr. Chapman reveals that the 
committee and the U. S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service have - set a goal of 
240,000,000 shells for farmers and 
hunters for 1944 and says it is ap- 
parent this reasonable supply can 
be made available without inter- 
fering in any way with the heeds 
of the Army and Navy. Chapman's 
letters is as follows: 

"For several months Mr. Ira 
Gabrielson. director of the Fish 
and Wildlife Service, and the Sel- 
ect Committee on Conservation of 
WildMf e Resources, of which I am 
a member, have as you know, tried 
to secure the manufacture and 
distribution of sufficient shotgun 
shells for farmers and sportsmen. 
"Eight hundred forty-one mil- 
lion shells were made in 1941 and 
many were left over for use in 
1942. The 'normal pre-war pro- 
duction was approximately 700,- 
000,000 annually. 

"This year, notwithstanding all 
the efforts made, only 82,000,000 
less than one-seventh of the norm- 
al supply, were made. 

"Our committee conducted a 
hearing last week (week of Dec. 6) 
in which it was brought out that 
the inability to obtain a larger 
amount of ammunition this year 
was due partly to the slowness In 
placing orders, but to a greater ex- 
tent to the inability to obtain 
brass, one of the most important 
strategic metals for military pur- 
poses, and the- reluctance of the 
manufacturers to make steel-based 
shells. 

"The first shells manufactured 
were ordered distributed in North- 
ern States because, in the migra- 
tion of birds, their seasons come 
first. Consequently there was a 
severe shortage in Southern 
States. 

"The Army has cancelled a 
number of contracts and several 
plants have been closed. There is 
no powder shortage. It is believed 
that a larger amount of brass and 
copper strips, in addition to steel 
strips, will be available to manu- 
facture shells for the next season. 
The goal has been set at 240,000,- 
000 shells, abput one-third of 
normal production. 

"The Army and Navy appear to 
have no objection. 

"The request has been based on 
three things, the necessity of con- 
trolling so-called pests by farm- 
ers, the need for proper recreation 
in the interest of civilian morale 
for the more than 13,000,000 citi- 
zens who pay for a hunting license, 
and consideration of the food sup- 
ply, which produced in dressed 
game last year, 255,000,000 pounds 
in the continental United States. 
"It is now apparent this reason- 
able supply of ammunition can be 
made available Without interfer- 
ing in arty way with the needs of 
the Army and Navy. 

"Here is hoping that we may se- 
cure the 240,000,000 shells for 1944." 













Calvert House. She has our sym- 
pathy 1 in he • bereavement. 

Mrs. M^ (tie Hodges received 
word of thjj deatfl of her sister- 
in-law Mrss Ida >Love Riggs, of 
Kokomo, IrM., last -week. She was 
the widow of the late Chas. Riggs, 
formerly of this -place. Relatives 
have our sincere sympathy. 

Joe Stephens and Mrs. Flora 
Stephens are on th sick list. 

We are glad tc report J. E. 
Hodges is improviL. ■ after an at- 
tack of flu and astpna. 

Mrs. Lou VanNeps has been ill. 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas.^Dolph, of Bel- 
leview visited with them Sunday. 

Mrs. S. B. Ryla of Rising Sun 
has been on the sick list. 

Lehman Wadsworth has a posi- 
tion in Cincinnati. , 

Mrs. Minnie Ste hens and Mrs. 
J. W. Craig visited ] th Mrs. Craig's 
mother, Mrs. BessieiJplore, of Wat- 
erloo last Saturday.^ 

Several from heiiajfwere shopping 
in Rising Sun, Safin-day. 

Mrs. Elmer JarreYl and husband 
entertained her sister and husband 
of Covington, Sunday. 

Mrs. Mellie Wingate spent Sun 
day night with her son, J. J.Soott 
and family. 

Mrs. Dora Delph and family 

«ent Sunday and Monday with 
m. Delph and i mily. Frank 
York and family, o\ Aurora, Ind., 
were dinner guests t^ere Sunday 



Boone County Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF 
GUARDIAN OF BEN AL RELET 

Alma B. Riley, Guardian of Ben 
Al Riley, has filed her settlement 
in the Boone County Court and 
any person having exceptions to 
file to the settlement must do so 
on or before February 7, 1944, 
(Next Regular Term of County 
Court). 30-2t-c 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk 
Boone County Court 



RABBIT HASH 

We have been having some lovely 
weather. 

J. E. Hodges remains very ill. 

Deloris Wilson has been suffer- 
ing with mumps. 

Word was received here of the 
illness of Ezra Aylor, of Florence. 

Mrs. Adah Wilson returned home 
Tuesday after attending the funer- 
al of her brother, Calvert Houze, of 
Indianapolis, Ind. She has our 
sympathy in her loss. 

Russell Stephens and wife were 
in our burg Thursday afternoon 
attending the funeral of their 
yncle, Walton Ward, who was buri- 
ed in Indiana. He was a former 
resident of this place. 

,Rev. Godby and wife were call- 
ing in this neighborhood Wednes- 
day. « 

Relatives of Mrs. Ida Riggs has 
our sympathy hi loss of a dear one. 
She was a former resident of this 
place. She died at the home of her 
son in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Robt. H: Wilson and Sam Wil- 
son butchered hogs last Tuesday. 

Quite a few from here are putting 
their tobacco on the market this 
week. 

Mrs. Mellie Wingate is at the 
bedside of her brother of East 
Bend. 

Mrs. Sarah Sqptt and sister, Miss 
Dona Ryle of Rising Sun. Ind., 
were shopping in Covington, last 
Thursday. 

Mrs. Mattie Hodges spent Sunday 
with Mrs. B. W. Clore and hus- 
band and called on Mrs. Lou Van- 
Ness. 

Paul L. Clore writes he has 
gained several pounds since being 
sent overseas. 

Mrs. Hazel Braden has been vis- 
iting her sister, Mrs. Dora M. York 
and family in Aurora, Ind. 
. I— — ' 

We are having some cold weath- 
er. .. V ' ~- 

Quite an epidemic of colds and 
flu reported here. 

Mrs. Adah Wilson was called to 
Indianapolis, Ind., last Friday on 
account of the death of her brother 



BOYS MAKE $1,018 

FROM TOBACCO CROP 

That farmers who used the lime- 
bluestone treatment of tobacco 
harvested the biggest yields was 
stated by Fa m Agent C. V. Bryan 
of Taylor county. Nolan and Dan 
Beningfield were giv *n nine-tenths 
of an acre for toh :co by then- 
father. The/ used Ky. 10 seed, 
the beds we 5 W&[ 3 twice with 
limei-stone, :„) l<rads$ of manure 
were? spread^and 4p^ pounds of 
4-12-8 used^in thf rows. The 
boys harvesMfl a '^rop of 1,814 
pounds of tobacco < hich sold for 
$57 per hundred, getting them 
$1,018 above expens > 

Robert Cowherd roduced 5,700 
pounds on three aL.es of turned 
crimson clover sody which was 
heavily manured afi beds treat- 
ed. His crop averted $55 per 
hundred pounds. Oy the farm of 
Allison Shipp, 1,650 "Pounds of Ky. 
41A were produced to the acre, 
which sold for $51 per hundred. 

CARD-OF THANKS 

I wish to take this opportunity 
to thank my friends and neighbors 
for their kindness /-hown to me 
during the ill jess ant death of my 
husband * 

G. M. Harr on 

Especially do I 4/h to thank 
the ladies of tjie W. *£ U. for their 
floral offerings; RejH Roy John- 
son for his consolirH? ,*words and 
Chambers & Grubbs^fbr the man- 
ner in which they conducted the 
funeral. lt-p 

Mrs. May Harrison 



EXECU TtlX' NOTICE 

All persons paving •laims again- 
st the estal j of G. If. Harrison, 
deceased are request J to present 
same properly*prover according to 
law and all persons ('owing said 
estate are reauested-to call and 



rea 
thf 



settle with tlHI undefsigned 



31-2t-p 



Majr Harrison, 
Executrix 



BooneJ^County Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE 
ESTATE OF MAR* T FRANCIS 
GAINES, DECEASED 

The Administrator of the estate 
of Mary Francis Gaines has filed 
his settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any p rson having 
exceptions to file tot s settlement 
must do so on or be* ire February 
7, 1944 (Next Regular Term of 
County Court). K 30-2t-c 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk 
Boone - (fcunty Court 



ADMINISTRATRIX' NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the state of Mrs. Emma Green, 
deceased are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons ii iebted to the 
said estate are reqm ted to call 
and settle immediately with the 
undersigned. 

tfene Green, 
29-2t-c Administratrix 



FARMS F0 f SALE 



53 ACRES near Bu, ngton; rich 
level land; some w^bds; fenced; 
new 5-room English shingle 
bungalow; all buiU in features. 
$8000. W 

97 ACRES near new firport; most 
level; 5-room hous i and barn; 
state road. 1 10,000. i 

240 ACRES m ir Bv lington; lays 
good; 8-rooi hou ?, electric; 2 
barns. $70 pyx acr 

INDIANA stock dai* ±and tobacco 
farm, 178 acres, N.\,W. of Brook- 
ville; 6-roon£*hous£ dairy barn, 
tobacco barra? douj|jt crib; strip- 
ping rm; silo, driveE well, cistern 
dug well; abundance of water; 
20 acres bottom land; 35 acres 
for crops; 40 a. for^hay; 6 acres 
alfalfa; about 70 acres of virgin 
timber, watiut, hickory, oak 
popular and maple. Price $30 per 
acre. y 2 cast ; balance 1st mort- 
gage at 3 peyent interest. 

I special in land— I nt %d farms. 

RELC. WA/MAN 

Office: 623 Washiiton St. 
Covington. Phonr^HE. 5107 
' ♦• Ind. 506 



! 



Boone ixjunty Court 
FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE 
ESTATE OF J. H. CLORE, 
DECEASED 

The Administrator, De Bonis 
Non, of the estate of J. H. Clore, 
deceased, has filed his settlement 
in the Boone County Court and 
any person having exceptions to 
file to the settlement must do so 
on or before February 7, 1944 
(Next Regular Term of County 
Court). 30-2t-c 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St. t f 

FOR SALE— Upright piano, Fisher 
make; ebony case; good condi- 
tion. Price, cheap. Call Mrs. 
Grace Castleman, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. 39. - 31-tf. 



WISCONSIN DAIRY COWS— 50 
head of hWvy-producirtgJ Holl 
stein dairy cows have arrived for 
your inspection; all have been 
T. ;B. and Bang's tested; alj 
record cows with . plenty o| 
quality; also 5 head of Guern- 
seys and 5 head of Brown Swiss 
to be sold for Mr. Ray Hedrick 
of Wisconsin. -Also 30 head of 
horses and mules; week's trial 
given. All stock must be as rep- 
resented or money refunded^ 
easy payments can be arranged; 
hog feed $1.65 per 100 lbs. GEN- 
ERAL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 E. 
Second St., Covington," Ky. lt-c 



LOST— Near Hopeful lane on Bur^ 
lington pike, Friday, January 14, 
7 bags shell corn and 4 bags of 
egg mash. Cash reward for re-* 
turn of same to Aylor & Meyer, 
Aurora, Ind. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Chester White gilt, 
due to farrow March 1; weigh 
250 lbs. C. G. Jones, East Bend 
Road, Burlington, Ky. Tel. Burl. 
527. it-pd 



WANTED— Tenant to raise 2M> 
3 acres of tobacco on shares, an 
to work by day; house and gar- 
den furnished. G. B. Yates, 
Idlewild, Ky. Tel. Burl. 259. 31 2c 



FOR SALE! — Fresh cow with sec- 
ond calf"; also doming 1 -year-old 
pony colt, saddle bred. Frank 
Kelly, Burlington, Ky. Phone 
Burl. 461. it-c. 



GET YOUR TOBACCO SEED AT 
CONNER'S LUNCH ROOM— I 
have Ky. 41A. This seed is the 
latest developed by the Experi- 
ment Station, highly resistant to 
root rot, quick grower, high yield- 
ing. Also No. 16 Root Rot Resist- 
ant. Both of these seeds are 
certified by the State. The old 
standby Warner's Golden Burley. 
Come in, get the seed to produce 
the kind of tobacco your ground 
requires. L. A. Conner, Burling- 
ton,. Ky. . 30- tf 



FOR SALE— Baled hay,, alfalfa, 
timothy and clover mixed; also 
soybean and 5 ton of straw. 
Floyd Campbell, Lawrenceburg, 
Ind., R. 1. . 29-3t-p 



WANTED. TO RENT— Either cash 
or share, 50 acres or better. Can 
furnish my own team and tools. 
Harry V. Xorentz, Florence, Ky., 
R- 1. 29-4t-ch. 



FOR SALE— Thor electric washer; 
living room sofa and chair with 
springs; Jenny Lind bed. May 
be seen at Mrs. John S. Ryle's, 
at Rabbit Hash. 29-4t-p 



TENANT— 130-acre farm in Pen- 
dleton County 6 miles north of 
Falmouth; all new buildings with 
electric; two acres of tobacco, 
milk dairy; must have good ref- 
erence; good proposition with 
right party. For further inform- 
tion write Mr. E. R. Powers, 2014 
McCoy Ave., Covington, Ken- 
tucky- 299-3t-c. 



FOR SALE— 50 shocks of fodder; 
1 set double work harness; 1 disc 
harrow; 1 Oliver breaking plow. 
J. W. Berkshire, 111 S. Main St., 
Walton, Ky. Telephone Walton 
Ml 30-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Baled alfalfa hay. P. 
J. Maddin, Walton, Ky. Tel. 
Walton 271. 30-2t-c 



FOR SALE— Purebred blood tested 
barred rock pullets and roosters. 
Price $1.50 each. Write or call 
Flossie Campbell Martin, Hill- 
crest Farm, Phone 359. 30-2t-c 



WANTED— Man to work on farm, 
to raise tobacco and work by 
day; everything furnished; $2.00 
per day. Dave Gaines, North 
Bend Bottoms. 30-2t-c 



TOBACCO SEED— Warner's Gold- 
en Burley improved white bur- 
ley.. Agents: L. K-. Conner, Bur- 
lington; B. F. Elliott, Walton; 
Walter Renaker, Verona; or by 
mail. $1.50 oz., 75c Y 2 oz. Clay 
Bedford, Cynthiana, Ky. 31-6t-c 



FOR- SALE— Nice Drphington hens, 
full blooded; ; reasonable. Mrs. 
Katherine G. tfady, Burlington, 
Ky., R. 1. it-pd 



FOR SALE— Team of young mules, 
mare and hor« 2 and 3 years 
old; also 2 frJp cows. Robert 
W. Smith, Burlmgton, R. 2. lt-p 



FOR RENT— Kenton farm on East 
Bend road. Will rent to person 
who can furnish equipment; 8.3 
acre tobacco "base; to raise 15 
acres of corn; hay to cut; can 
furnish house with electric. Edna 
Doan, 407 Scott St., Covington, 
Ky. 31-2-p 



STRAYED FROM HOME— Thin- 
rind pig, weigh 35 lbs., with nar- 
row list around neck. Anyone 
knowing of its whereabouts, I 
will appreciate it if they would 
call Burlington 570. Mrs. Harry 
Hamilton. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Nine 100-lb. shoats. 
Clyde Anderson, Price Pike, 
Florence, Ky. lt-ch 



NOTICE— We have decided to con- 
tinue our sawing business and 
will be open at all times; also 
good line of sleds for sale. W. A. 
Waters, Limaburg, Ky. 30-4t-p 



WANTED— 100 Locust posts abou„ 
5 or 6-in. dim. and 8 ft. long, 
delivered to my place; also 6 
corner posts about 8 or 10 in. 8 
ft. long. Al Hesselman, R. 4, 
Box 415. Turkeyfoot Road, Er- 
langer, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Jersey cow with calf, 
$80.00. A. R. Kinman & Son, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 2. It-pd. 



FOR SALE— 5 shoats, weigh 150 to 
175 lbs. each. J. V. Tupman, 
Sterling Rouse Farm, near Lima- 
burg, Ky. lt-p 



_i_ 



WANTED— Saleslady. Dixie Dry 
Goods, Co., Elsmere, Ky. Tel. 
Dixie 7355. lt-c 



FOR SALE— 1930 Chevrolet; fair 
tires and motor. Will trade for a 
bred O. I. C. sow or horse. Eldon 
Ryle, Burlington, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— DeLaval magnetic | 
electric milker; practically new. 
W. O. Rector, Petersburg, Ky., R. 
D. Tel. Burl. 372. 31-tf 



FOR SALE— 128-acre farm located 
4 miles west of Union on Grange 
Hall-Burlington road; 3-acre to- 
bacco base; 3- room house;, dairy 
barn and all necessary outbuild- 
ings. Farm in good state of cult- 
ivation. This farm being sold to 
settle estate. E. A. Connelly, Ex- 
ecutor. Address 449 Palace Ave., 
Erlanger, Ky. . 31-3-pd. 



WANTED— Lady to clean office 
and wash windows one <jtay each 
week. Apply Forest Lawn Mem- 
orial Cemetery, Erlanger. Ask for 
Jim Owens, Phone Dixie 7172. 

31-2t-pd. 



WANTED— Tenant, to raise 6 to 10 
acres of tobacco; corn and other 
crops on shares. H. L. Kirby, 
Big Bone Church Road. Phone 
Ffor. 957. 30-3t-pd 



FOR SALE — 4-Room house, furn- 
ace, running water, garage In 
basement; room for bath, with 
14-acre lot. Call Burl. 686.' Leon 
E. Ryle, located at McVille, Ky., 
near Dam 38. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE — Fresh cow with calf 
two weeks old. William G. Wahl, 
Tel. Hebron 172-X. 30-2t-c 



FOR RENT— 40-Acre farm located 
4Vfe miles from Florence; con- 
crete block barn; plenty of wat- 
er; 65 apple trees; 900 ft. grape 
arbor. Share or money rent. Im- 
mediate possession. Apply Ben 
An ten, Florence, Ky. Tel. 21. 30-p 



WANTED TO BUY— Small farm, 
close in. Will pay cash. Must be 
worth the money asked. , C. M. 
Emral, Florence, Ky., R. 1. 29-3c 



FOR SALE — 50 tons of straight 
timothy and timothy and clover 
mixed hay. Ralph Jones and 
Dave Gaines, Tel. Flor 8103-J or 
Heb. 221. 29-4t-pd 



LET HELM help increase your 
poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years contest 
winners; official world's records; 
government approved ; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. ojuly31 



WANTED— Woman to work ' in 
kitchen and assist with cooking. 
Swan Restaurant. Tel. Dixie 
7555. 22-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf. 



AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT 
~ —BUY NOW 
Special This Week Only 

BEDROOM SUITES $49.00 np 




Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison, Cov. HE. 9273 
MOSS FOB TOUR MONEY 



V 






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~* ™ Tim Km CUTTING' 
PUBLIC ^f^ 6tatute8 1 Amcle 1164 



1 

I 




THE BOONE COUNTY 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



VOLUME 68 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January 27, 1944 








SERve mid 




NUMBER 32 



MRS. FANNIE SCOTT 
NAMED CHAIRMAN 



Tobacco Specialist 

To Meet Local Growers 



OF COUNTY INFANTILE PAR- 
ALYSIS CAMPAIGN— MONEY IS 
DIVIDED BETWEEN STATE- 
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. 



Plans are being made for the an- 
nual fund-raising drive to raise 
money with which to fight infan- 
tile paralysis in the State and in 
the Nation. 

In Boone County, the campaign 
will be under the leadership of 
Mrs. Fannie Scott of Florence, Ky., 
whose appointment as chairman 
for the county was announced by 
H. St. G. T. Carmichahel, State 
Chairman. 

The money given by the people 
of the State is divided into two 
equal parts. One half is sent to 
the' National Foundation for In- 
fantile Paralysis, which uses it for 
research into the cause and cure 
for this disease, and also sends 
nurses, doctors, money and other 
help to any area where an epidemic 
rages. 

The other half is turned over to 
the Kentucky State Chapter of the 
Foundation, which pay it out when 
called on by the Kentucky Crippled 
Children's Commission, in cases of 
infantile paralysis only. The 
Chapter also brought to Kentucky 
in 1942 during an epidemic a train- 
ed Kenny technician, who is still 
working at the Kosair Hospital in 
Louisville, where an average of 
thirty children from all over the 
State are receiving treatment The 
Chapter also sent two trained 
nurses to the University of Min- 
nesota for a six-months course in 
the Kenny method and is paying 
their salaries at the same hospital, 
where they are stationed. 



Bullittsville Homemakers 
Sponsor Waste Paper Drive 

The Bi'lHttsville Homemakers are 
sponsoring a waste paper salvage 
campaign in the Bullittsville neigh- 
borhood, it was announced this 
week. Collection date for the pap- 
er has been set for February 3rd. 

Persons having no way of deliv- 
ering paper to the home of Mrs. 
Albert Willis, please contact Mrs. 
Willis or Robert Grant. Mr. Grant 
will use his truck for picking up 
the paper on the above date. * 

Proceeds from the paper will be 
used for construction of floral hall 
on the fair grounds. All persons 
in the community are urged to co- 
operate in this drive. 



Rabbit Hash Homemakers 
Will Sponsor Paper Drive 

The Rabbit Hash Homemakers 
will sponsor a waste paper drive 
this week, closing February 8th. 
The student body of Hamilton 
school will assist with collecting. 

Everyone please bring or send 
your paper to Hamilton school or 
Chas. Craig's store. If you have 
no way of transportation, please 
notify Mrs. Edith Caudill or Mrs. 
Orville Kelly. 



Russell Hunt tobacco specialist 
from the College of Agriculture 
will meet with county growers on 
Friday, February 25th, according 
to H. R. Forkner, County Agent. 
Mr. Hunt will discuss new produc- 
tion practices recommended for 
1944. 

There are many new recom- 
mendations and practices in tobac- 
co production that are bringing 
growers greater cash returns. The 
exact time of the meeting will be 
announced in the near future. 



Walton Team Chalks Up 

Victory Over Burlington 



Walton hoopsters chalked up 
another for the win^ column Fri- 
day night when they defeated the 
BuJtington team 25-J5. Walton took 
the3 lead after first quarter when 
the j score stood 4-4, with a lead at 
halt of 11-6. Pennington was high 
poi: it man for Walton with 11 
pbi: its, while Presser and Tupman 
collected 4 each for Burlington. 

In a preliminary game the Bur- 
lington reserves emerged on the 
long end of a 22-21 count. 

Burlington will meet Hebron 
Friday night, on the Burlington 
floor. 



INCOME TAX MAN 
TO VISIT COUNTY 



-r 



=* 



FOR PURPOSE OFvASSISTING IN- 
DIVIDUALS IN PREPARING RE- 
TURNS—WILL BE IN BURLING- 
TON FEBRUARY 16 THRU 19. 



Collector of Internal Revenue, S 
R. Glenn, announces that a deputy] 
from his office will visit Burling-, 
ton February 16th through 19th, 
8:30 a. m. for the purposejof assist- 
ing individual taxpayers in prepar- 
ing their returns. Mr. Glenn says 
that the new Revenue Act is in 
many particulars different from 
the laws previously in effect. 
Special attention is called to the 
many changes affecting taxpayers 
in the Armed Forces, and particul- 
arly the additional allowance for 
personal exemption for taxpayers 
in the Armed Forces. 

The Collector says that the many 
changes cannot be explained in a 
shore notice, but that his deputy 
is familiar with the law and is be- 
ing sent here to be of real service 
to the taxpaying public. The ser- 
vice is absolutely free. Collector 
Glenn urges the taxpayers of this 
county to see the. deputy and let 
him help them with their income 
tax problems. , 



CHRISTMAS SEAL 

SALE OVER TOP 



TOTAL OF $828.47 RAISED IN 
COUNTY, ACCORDING TO R. V. 
LENTS, EXECUTTVE SECRE- 
TARY. 

, 



AGRICULTURE COLLEGE 

PLANNING STATE-WIDE 

DRIVE FOR MORE FOOD 

A state- wide program to en- 
courage the production of more 
fodd on farms and in toWn is an- 
nounced from the University of 
K«atucky College of Agriculture 
ani Home Economics. Farm fam- 
ine's will be urged to produce as 
nearly as possible their entire food 
supply, and town and city people 
will be urged to increase the size 
of their gardens. Many town 
families also can raise poultry, it 
is stated. 

The program will be carried into 
evfrry county and community in 
Kentucky, it is announced. Work- 
in*, in cooperation, with csmntyi 
f a7n and home agents win be a 
la* $e number of neighborhood 
lealers. These leaders will be 
specially trained to pass along in- 
formation on the production of 
vegetables, fruit, poultry and dairy 
products. 

In connection with the all-out 
food production program, the Col- 
lege of Agriculture and Home ^c- 
onjjmics has issued six leaflets 
wKich can be had free at the of- 
fices of county agents, county home 
de* honstration agents or from the 
co lege. They are: "Grow. Your 
0\ To. Food," "Your Vegetable Gar- 
den," "Keep Chickens and Eggs for 
Home Use," "Grow Fruits and Veg- 
etables," "Canning Fruits and 
Vegetables," and "The Family 
Cow." 

"The test of the food production 
program is what families will have 
on hand next December," said Miss 
Myrtle Weldon, state leader of 
home demonstration work. "In 1943 
Kentucky ' farm families had ap- 
proximately 100,000,000 jars of can- 
ned food and vast quantities of 
stored fruits and root crops. The 
goal for 1944 is to top the out- 
standing achievement of last year." 



— 






Pastor Called For Big 

Bone Baptist Church 

At a business meeting of the Big 
Bone Baptist Church held last 
week, Rev. Sam Hogan, of Louis- 
ville was called as pastor for the 
ensuing year. 

Rev. Hogan is a Seminary man 
and will move into the parsonage 
in the near future, according to re-, 
ports. 

PRIMING PAYS 
WEED GROWERS 



R. V. Lents, executive secretary 
of the Boone County Tuberculosis 
Association reports $828.47 as the 
amount of Tuberculosis Christmas 
Seals sold during the last drive. 
Mr. Lents stated through the 
columns of this newspaper two 
weeks ago that reports were com- 
ing in slowly, and at that time it 
did not appear the goal would be 
reached. A goal of $725 was set 
for the county, and the sale went 
more than $100 over the goal. 

The Kentucky Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation gets 33 percent of the sale, 
and it cost about 5 percent of the 
sale for stationery, stamps, and. 
prizes for the school children who 
aided in the drive. This leaves 
more than 62 percent of the gross 
sale to be used to aid in stamping 
out tuberculosis right here in 
Boone County. 

The sale of each community was 
as follows: Belleview, $45.37; Bur- 
lington $105.05; Burlington color- 
ed $22.05; Constance $69.05; Flor- 
ence $152.56; Hamilton $23.50; Heb- 
ron $14027; Union $6525; Peters- 
burg $39.96; Walton $11621; Ver- 
ona $44.00; Anonymous, $510; total 
$828.47. 



ONE-SUCKER PAYS. OUT 



Millard Terry of Carlisle county 
grew seven-tenths of ai&acre of to- 
bacco which brought him $648 
above expenses. S. J. Cissell of the 
same county harvested two acres of 
one-sucker tobacco" that weighed 
4,000 pounds and brought him $500 
per acre. 



W. S. C. S. TO HAVE BAKE SALE 

The W. S. C. S. of the Florence 
Methodist Church will have a bak- 
ery sale at Dinn's Restaurant, Sat- 
urday, January 29, starting at 9:00 
a. m. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith left last 
Thursday morning for Miami, Fla., 
to visit their son Julius, who is 
stationed there with the U. S. 
Navy. 



Standard Oil Subscribes 
In Local War Bond Drive 



The Boone County quota in the 
Fourth War Loan Drive is ^nearer 
fulfillment today due to the sub- 
scription of $2,000.00 by Standard 
Oil Company (Ky.). 

Mr. C. E. Nelson, the Company's 
local agent at Erlanger. entered 
the subscription for Standard Oil, 
and received expressions of ap- 
preciation from the committee. 

Mr. Nelson, well known in this 
community .stated that the action 
of the Standard Oil Company was 
taken as an expression of the gen- 
uine interest of the organization 
in the success of the Fourth War 
Loan in Boone County and in the 
State. 



PRACTICE FOLLOWED ON EX- 
TENSIVE SCALE IN BOONE 
COUNTY— CHILDREN CAN DO 
PRIMING WORK. 

— 

Priming or pulling of the over- 
ripe lower leaves from the tobacco 
stalks before cutting time was tried 
the past year on an extensive scale 
in the county for j the first time, 
according to the County Agent's 
office. Reports on this work wUl 
be made from time to time. Two 
sales reported recently indicate 
this practice is profitable. 

J. F. Cleek of Beaver recently 
sold over $300 worth of primed 
leaves from three acres and re- 
ported profitable ' results. The 
primed leaves averaged approxim- 
ately 50 cents per pound. 

James G. Pennington, of Walton 
reports that he sold 300 pounds of 
primed leaf from three acres that 
averaged $56 per hundred pounds. 

Most growers are agreeing that 
where labor is available priming is 
a profitable practice. The harvest- 
ing of the primed leaves can easily 
be done by children. 



BONDS OVER AMERICA 



i** 



■fr 







In lower Manhattan 
where George Wash- 
ington took the oath 
as president, stands 
his statue on the steps 
of the Sab-Treasury, 
a monument to our 
fiscal security. 



G. Washingto i 





III 








1 




1 




Help Yourself 
Buy Wat Bonds 



In Belgium die Nazis 
now are sell g property 
confiscated fom loyal 
Belgiant o iSaidents co- 
operating with their Nazi 
masters further compli- 
cating the fiscal affairs 
of that t-oufted land. 



Stevens-dead 



The " wedding ceremony which 
united Miss Lucille Nead, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Nead of near 
Walton, and Mr. Thomas Stevens, 
son of Mrs. Rosa Stevens of near 
Burlington, was solemnized at 
4:30 p. m., on. January 19. Bro. 
William Shearer and Howard 
Sharp, former schoolmate and 
close *friend of the groom, officiat- 
ed, using a single ring ceremony. 

The attendants were Miss Fern 
Nead, sister of the bride, and Carl 
Stevens, brother of the groom. 

The bride was attired in a love- 
ly powder blue suit with turf tan 
accessories. The bridesmaid wore 
a green suit with black and gold 
accessories. The groom wore a 
dark blue suit arid the best man 
wore brown. 

The groom is a graduate of the 
New Haven High School and at- 
tended Littleford-Nelson Business 
School. The bride is a graduate of 
Hamilton High School and Little- 
ford-Nelson Business School and 
\vas employed s& avder c^erk -and 
typist at The Wadsworth Watch 
Case Company, Dayton. 

After a short honeymoon in 
Ohio, Mr. and Mrs. Stevens will be 
at the home of the groom on his 
farm near Burlington. 

Among the events given in hon- 
or of the bride was a party by Mrs. 
Betty Lead of Dayton; a kitchen, 
shower by Mrs. J. L. Payne and 
daughter, Mae; and two miscell- 
aneous showers by Mrs. Margaret 
Bolton of Ft. Mitchell and Mrs. 
George Prigge and Miss Virginia 
Stevens at the home of their 
mother. 



Local Man Stationed 

At Pearl Harbor 



Lt. Walter Ferguson, United 
States Marine Corps Reserves sail- 
ed from San Francisco, Calif., for 
Pearl Harbor, recently,' according 
to reports received here. 

Lt. Ferguson, formerly of Union, 
is well fcnown throughout the 
county, and has the best wishes 
of his many friends here. 



Local Man Elected 
Member Of Kentucky 
Engineers' Society 

Noel Walton, Burlington civil en- 
gineer and county surveyor was 
elected a fellow member of the 
Kentucky Society of Professional 
Engineers at the joint meeting of 
the Kentucky Society and the Am- 
erican Society of the Civil Engin- 
eers at the Lafayette Hotel, Lex- 
ington, last Friday. 

At this meeting, J. Steve Wat- 
kins, the speaker and new State 
Highway Commissioner urged those 
present to set up plans for pro- 
jects to provide postwar employ- 
ment for returning soldiers. Wat- 
kins disclosed that Kentucky and 
the national government had plans 
for 70 million dollars worth of new 
roads for Kentucky in the postwar 
era. 

Technicolor movies of the Alaska 
highway project were shown 'at the 
meeting and highlighted the pro- 
gram. 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, January 30, Bible School 
at 10:00 a. tn. Mr. Woodford Crig- 
ler, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
We will have as our guest the Rev. 
Richard Trojan, pastor of St. 
Mark's Lutheran Church, Newport, 
Ky., who will bring us the sermon 
at this time. May we have a good 
attendance. 



Landlord-Tenant 

Trade; Completed 

The largest numbeb of landlord 
tenant trades of anytime in foe 
past year were mideiist week, ac- 
cording to W. M.l$mith, Farm 
Labor Assistant. Activity is ex- 
pected to pick up until March 1st 
the usual date for teaant moves. 

There still rem? In a large num- 
ber of landlord a^q tenant place- 
ments to be made. ; here are also 
a number of request for day and 
month hands to be*?filled. Any- 
one knowing of available help not 
now employed is urged to notify 
the County Agen s office. 



Mrs. Johnnie Louden injured her 
hand when she£tau.$ht it in a 
washing machine*wrr ger, Monday 
morning. 



.1- 



THREE MEN INDUCTED 

Three men from Local Draft 
Board No. 9 were recently inducted 
into the U. S. Army v . They are 
Robert Junior Martin, Walter Grif- 
fin and "Boyd Marion Jones. 



LOCAL MAN FACES 
ARSON CHARGES 



FIRE STARTED IN ROAD HOUSE 
OF RUSSELL MILLER AT BIG 
BONE, ACCORDING TO INVEST- 
IGATING OFFICERS. 



James McCubbin, 40_ a tenant 
farmer of near Beaver Lick, was 
arrested Saturday by Deputy State 
Fire Marshal, Walter C. Brown ahd 
Sheriff J. T. Williams on a charge 
of arson. 

McCubbin was charged with hav- 
ing set fire to the roadhouse of 
Russell Miller, Big Bone, using 
gunny sacks, gasoline and matches 
for his purpose. 

The fire which was discovered 
Sunday in the basement of the 
establishment was extinguished be- 
fore any great damage had been 
done to the property. 

McCubbin was arrested follow- 
ing a five-day investigation by 
Deputy State Fire Marshal Brown, 
and Sheriffs Williams and Rouse. 
He was 'arraigned Saturday before 
Judge C. L. Cropper of Boone 
County and bond was set at $2,000. 
H> was released Sunday after 
friends posted bond. 

Evidence in the case will be 
heard by the Boone County grand 
jury which will convene the sec- 
ond week in April. 



LEADERS W PLAN 
FOQJL?R0GRAM 



AT MEETING SCHEDULED FOR 
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2ND— 
JOHN S. GARONEtt WILL BE 
GUEST SPEAKER. 

— " — 

The home fooi^ pi\ Ruction pro- 
gram is one of the m«st important 
farm operations for, 1944, accord- 
ing to H. R. Forkner,* bounty Agent. 
Leaders from Homemakers' clubs, 
Community Agricultural programs 
and other organisations will meet 
at Burlington orrWednesday, Feb- 
ruary 2nd to plan a more effective 
home food production program 
for this year. 

The home foo p: iduction pro- 
gram will includunc\ mly the pro- 
duction of better gardens and 
home meat, dairy anr$poultry pro- 
ducts but the preservation and 
preparation of diese- products for 
the family table to the extent that 
every farm fam'ly will have an 
abundance of hi hest quality of all 
the necessary n_trious foods. 

John S. Gardner, Field Agent in 
garden crops from the College of 
Agriculture will 'je a guest speaker 
at the leaders' neeting. He will 
be assisted by t e lo< al leaders in 
making plans : jr \\e 1944 pro- 
gram. , 



Twenty Blood Donors 

Needed February 4th 



Appointment has been made for 
twenty persons at the Blood Bank 
in Cincinnati, Friday, February 4th 
at 2 p. m., according to an an- 
nouncement issued this week. All 
persons planning to attend are 
urged to refrain from eating for at 
least four hours previous to their 
appointment. 

Persons planning to attend on 
the above date are urged to be at 
the courthouse in Burlington by 1 
p. m., where transportation will be 
provided. 

Anyone desiring to donate a pint 
of blood to the Armed Forces is 
urged to notify Mrs. Lou Pope, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1, or call Bur- 
lington 473. 



Eradication Of 

Household Pests 
Planned By Leaders 



Plans were made to eradicate 
many household pests by leaders 
who attended a training class last 
week in Burlington. Miss Ida C. 
Hagman conducted the all-day 
class attended by fourteen leaders 
representing seven clubs. 

Damage to property, life habits 
of importance to effective control 
and methods of control served as 
an outline for the study of house- 
hold pests such as silver fish, cock- 
roaches, flies, mosquitoes, moths 
and many other pests. The group 
decided that an effective cam- 
paign should be promoted in each 
community to destroy and prevent 
flies and mosquitoes. 

The study of "Household Pests" 
will be the magic lesson present to 
homemakers at their local clubs 
in February. 



George N. Parsons 

George N. Parsons, of near Heb- 
ron, passed away Saturday, Janu- 
ary 22, following an attack of in- 
fluenza. 

He was a farmer and a member 
of Junior Order Master Mechanics 
Concord Council, of Cincinnati. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Lenora Parsons; 1 son, Stanley 
Parsons; one half-brother, Adrian 
Wilson and a half-sister Miss Mar- 
garet Wilson, both of Cincinnati. 

Funeral services were conducted 
from his home Tuesday, January 
25 at 2 p. m., with Rev. Helton, 
pastor of Sand Run Baptist 
Church, officiating. Burial was in 
Hebron Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs, Walton 
funeral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 



$71,675.75 SOLD IN 
WAR BOND DRIVE 



ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE 
SUBSCRIBE DURING FIRST 
WEEK— DRIVE CLOSES FEB- 
RUARY 15TH. 






County Agent 
confined to his 
an attack of flu 




Forkner was 
meTTuesday with 



Verona Girl Pledged 
To Membership In 
Alpha Gamma Delta 

Evelyn Percival Coffman, Verona 
daughter of Mrs. Gi ver Ransom, 
ahd a junior in ^ie QJlege of Edu- 
cation at the TJ ivewpy of Ken- 
tucky. Lexingtoi, hasfbeen pledged 
to membershin?, in the Alpha 
Gamma Delta swal sorority at the 
state university.™ 

She is a 'graduate of Walton- 
Verona High School. 



Price Pike Hojie 

Damaged l FireTues. 

Fire, ascribe to $ spontaneous 
combustion, da^age^the home of 
Jesse F. England on,-price Pike to 
the extent of $200 , ^Tuesday, ac- 
cording to report^. "England and 
members of his family^ were forced 
to flee in their light clothing. 

Awakened by* smoke, England 
roused his wife and three children 
and assisted them to a neighbor's 
home. ' 

The Florence Volunteer Fire De- 
partment was 3umm< ned and suc- 
ceeded in preve iting spread of the 
fire, which sta ted \ the base- 
ment, h, i V 



i 



Florence Man Buys 

Registered Jersey 

A registered Jersey cow has been 
purchased by Pedro Crawford of 
Florence from Charles F. Kinsey 
& Son. The name of the animal 
is Sybil Volunteer Ivy 1413640. 

The whereabouts of all register- 
ed Jerseys is known and carefully 
watched over by The American 
Jersey Cattle Club, with offices in 
New York City. This important 
job is made possible through regist- 
rations and transfers made by Jer- 
sey breeders everywhere. Tattoo 
identification, somewhat similar to 
fingerprinting, keeps individuals 
of this dairy breed always known. 

Jerseys make up 42 percent of all 
dairy cows in the United States. 
Because they produce the world's 
richest milk, and because there 
are more Jerseys than any other 
breed in America, their role in Na- 
tional Defense is an important one. 
Increased production of Jersey 
milk guarantees the protective 
food needs of here and abroad. 



Subscriptions for the first week 
of the Fourth War Loan Drive in 
Boone County, ending last Satur- 
day night amounted to $71,675.75 
from 185 subscribers. 

This is a very good start on our 
quota of $500,000.00. All county 
chairmen are requested to organ- 
ize their workers and make an ac- 
tive campaign to see if a window 
sticker can not be placed in l the 
window of every home in Boone 
County. All subscribers should ask 
for one of these window stickers 
when making a subscription at 
your bank if the bank employees 
should overlook giving you one. 
This will show that you are doing 
your bit in this drive. 

One drfy last week a (tenant 
farmer s$ld his crop of tobacco 
for $700.0^ and when he came to 
one of the\ banks in the county to 
cash his crieck he purchased $600.00 
in Series "A. Bonds, saying that he 
had purchased $200.00 in E bonds 
in previous drives and wanted to 
do all he/could in this Fourth War 
Loan Drive. He further stated that 
he haa no close relatives in the 
army but that he would gladly 
make his government a present of 
his $800.00' in bonds if it would 
stop this war irhmediately, and 
that he felt the more bonds we buy 
the quicker this war will end and 
that he expected to put every dol- 
lar he could possibly spare; into 
War Bonds. 

These War Bonds purchased by 
this man is practically all the 
wealth he possessesJf everyone was 
as patriotic and loyal to his coun- 
try as is this man, our quota would 
be reached without any trouble 
and within a short time. How 
many more citizens in Boone Coun- 
ty have we like this? 

The drive closes February 15th, 
but please do not wait for the last 
week to enter your subscriptions. 
Try to get more than half the 
quota before February 1st. 

The 2Vi, 2V 2 and the 7-8 percent 
bonds are dated February 1st and 
you should subscribe for these is- 
sues before February 1st, other- 
wise you will be required to pay 
the accrued interest from February 
1st on subscriptions made after 
that date. You should also. sub- 
scribe for Series E, F and G before 
February 1st because all bohds of 
this series dated in January bears 
interest from January 1st, but you 
do not have to pay this accrued 
interest, and you therefore gain a 
month's interest. ' < 

Full steam ahead this week! 



■ Mrs. William Greenup and 
daughter Sue, of Union, were call- 
ing on friends and relatives here, 
one day last week. 



Pressure Cooker 

Owners Urged To Ask 
For New Instructions 



» Anyone who has purchased a 
Victory Pressure Canner made by 
the National Pressure Cooker Com- 
pany is requested to destroy the 
instruction and recipe book that 
came with the canner. Either write 
direct to the firm or contact Mary 
Hood Gillaspie, Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent, Burlington for a new 
instruction book. 

The National Pressure Cooker 
Company has requested all old 
recipe books be destroyed because 
definite improvements in instruc- 
tions have been made recently. 

All pressure cookers have been 
removed from the ration list since 
the last week in December. 



HOgEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 



Sunday, January 30, Bible School 
at 10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 

Luther League business and so- 
cial meeting at the church on 
Thursday, Feb. 3, at 8:00 p. m. ; 






SPECIAL PLANS 
MADE FOR YEAR 



— 



_ 



' 



IN FOUR-H ORGANIZATION* AT 
MEETING HELD BY LEADERS 
. AT BURLINGTON SATURDAY— 
' WORK BEGINS FEB. 1ST; 



Special plans for a banner 4-H 
organization in 1944 were made by 
Boone County 4-H leaders at Bur- 
lington on last Saturday, accord- 
ing to H. R. Forkner, County Agent. 
Organization work of community 
clubs will begin February 1st with 
clubs organized in each of the high 
school and grade schools in the 
county. Enrollment is expected to 
equal the record enrollment of 575 
members of last year. 

Project work of direct import- 
ance to the war effort will receive 
special attention this year. Mem- 
bers in addition to carrying war 
projects will be encouraged to 
keep business records on their pro- 
ject activities. A countywide 4-H 
Council and adult leaders' advisory 
meeting will be held at Burlington 
on February 26th to assist in pro- 
ject plans. 

Leaders attending the Saturday 
conference were D. H. Norris, pres- 
ident of the 4-H and Utopia coun- 
cil; Hubert Baker, Walton; Mrs. 
Albert Willis, Hebron; Mr. and Mrs. 
R. V. Lents, Constance; Rachel 
Pottinger, Grant; Mrs. Vernon 
Pope, Burlington; J. C. Acree, 
Hamilton; Mary Hood Gillaspie, O. 
D. Perkinson and E. E. Fish, Exper- 
iment Station, Lexington. 



1" 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



Si 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENT! CKY 

id 



v 












BOONE CIIIINTY REEflRnEH 



A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 
RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY 







BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 
ADVERTISING INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per Column inch. 

NOTICES AND CARDS or THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. 1 

CLASSIFIED ADS: 25 words for 25c; njinimum 25c; each additional 
word one cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
ems; column depth, 21 inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate $1.50 Per Year 




MEMBER 

AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Years 



MEMBER 




■ 



- 



KEtffl/cKY PRES 



/^A SSOCI ATION, 

fc^— P OlCiUI. 



oicjutuiD TTFVTFT «*•» 



octane miracle is that it has been 
financed principally by the oil in- 
dustry. The oil companies have 
spent hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars perfecting this high test fuel 
and building production facilities. 
All of which means the oil indus- 
try has faith in the future of 
private enterprise. It is endeavor- 
ing to demonstrate in action rath- 
er than words that industry oper- 
ated by private citizens, if given a 
fair chancej has the resourceful- 
ness and flexibility to lick any 
problem confronting it. 



. 



FAITH PRODUCES MIRACLES 

It is rumored that the Germans 
are about to spring a miraculous 
secret weapon upon the world cap- 
able of obliterating cities at a 
single blow. Far fetched as the 
viea may sound, Allied leaders long 
ago ceased underestimating Germ- 
an resourcefulness. They are driv- 
ing to knock out the Nazis before 
they can come forth with any 
more; death-dealing surprises. Our 
bombers are reaching with grow- 
ing force into the industrial vitals 
of Europe. They are carrying 
loads of explosives that dwarf pre- 
vious efforts of the Luftwaffe. 

The average layman has little 
conception of the miracles taking 
place right here in our own coun- 
try which make possible two- 
thousand-ton air raids on Berlin. 
One of those miracles is 100 octane 
gasoline. Two years ago daily 
capacity for the manufacture of 
100 octane was only about 40,000 
barrels — enough to fuel a single 
five-*hour raid engaging 1000 4-mo- 
tored bombers, similar to recent 
Berlin attacks. Now it is approx- 
imately 200,000 barrels daily, more 
than five times as much, and be- 
fore many months it will double 
again. Without 100 octane gaso- 
line, our bombers would be unable 
to carry out their missions. 

A significant fact about the 100 



WHAT MADE AMERICA GROW? 

Post-War planning Is running 
along two distinct lines. One group 
believes that it will be the func- 
tion of government to provide the 
jobs and productive ability which 
will bring prosperity to the coun- 
try after the war. The other group, 
realizing that America grew and 
became prosperous through the 
individual enterprise system, be- 
lieves that private industry must 
again take up the responsibility. 

If we are to become a totalitar- 
ian state with all enterprises run 
and controlled by the government, 
then there will be only one source 
of jobs and that is the government. 

On the other hand, if the in- 
dividual enterprise system is to be 
maintained, and every pool indi- 
cates that the people of this coun- 
try want it to be maintained, then 
the only force which put the sys- 
tem in motion — private capital — 
must be encouraged. 

Capital will not be ventured un- 
less it is assured of a square deal. 
The Wagner Act, as administered, 
has been and is so one-sided that 
it will be, after the war, the most 
powerful force in existence in dis- 
couraging ventured capital. That 
is only another way of saying that 
it will be the most powerful force 
in the world exerted to restrict 
employment. Eliminate or modify 
the wagner Act to give enterprise 



an equal and fair break and priv- 
ate capital will come out of hiding 
and put people back to work. 

CARE REQUIRED IN 

USING FROZEN FOODS 

Freezing in itself does not spoil 
canned foods, say foods specialists 
at the Kentucky College of Agri- 
culture and- Home Economics. How- 
ever, when food swells in freezing 
it may break a glass jar, or cause 
a tin can to bulge, so that spoil- 
age organisms may enter. When 
a jar of frozen food breaks, there 
is danger that the food may con- 
tain some of the broken glass; 
hence, that jar and contents 
should be discarded. All canned 
foods which have frozen should be 
examined. Those that show leak- 
age should be used at once, prepar- 
ed like any canned food. Contain- 
ers which show bulges but no leak- 
age should also be used as soon as 
possible, if they cannot be kept 
frozen they may have a break too 
small to let leak out» but that 
would let organisms in. As a safe- 
guard, it is advisable to boil such 
thawed foods for 15 minutes be- 
fore tasting. 



Go To Church 



BELLEYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. C Guth, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. Ligers, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone is cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



EAST BEND METHODIST 

CHUDCH 
Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday evening at 7 p. m.; also 
every fifth Sunday morning and 
evening. 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend, y 



MIXES OWN FEED 

Mrs. Thurmond Johnson of 
Greenup county cleared $130 on 
her flock of 85 hens in two 
months time. Following the sug- 
gestions of Kentucky College of 
Agriculture and Home Economics, 
Mrs. Johnson mixed her own home- 
grown feeds. 



jjiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimp' 

§ PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 1 



FLOCK IS PROFITABLE 

Mrs. Lucian White of Knox coun- 
ty sold $169.75 worth of eggs in 
one month, from her flock of 185 
Rhode Island Reds. Her profit 
was $124.84. The hens laid an av- 
erage of 21 eggs in the 30 days. 



COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



f-*Vu.. I 






fATi 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 






- 



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F. W. Kassebaum & Son, Inc. 

Authorized Dealers 

- 

'Rock of Ages" Baxre Granite 

MONUMENTS 

Aurora, Indiana 

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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 



Ambulance Service 






I LUDLOW, 



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KENTUCKY I 



Phone COlonial 2580 



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H THE TEST OF TIME ... 

=5 After more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 55 

we can safely say that our organization has stood this stern- 
= est and most exacting of all trials. 



| Chambers & Grubbs j 

= FUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 352 S 

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DEAD STOCK 




For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CAIL 

VALLEY 0887 

We pay 'phone charges 

Kentucky Dead Animal 
Disposifr Co. 



LOCKLAND, 



OHIO 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Robt. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 
Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 
Church 12:0i E W. T. 
Evening services 8 p. m. E. W. T. 

FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt.' 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even- 
ing 8 p.m. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an " work with us. 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 



c 






RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



IrvPROvfa) ~ tU 

UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY 
choql Lesson 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 

Of The Moody ^Ible Insti ute of Chicago. 

Released by V ;stern Ne spaper Union. 



L 



a 



Lesson for January 30 



Lesson subjec b and Scripture texts 'se- 
lected and cow/righted ' 4>y International 
Council of Religious * 
permission. 



E<? cation; used by 



.<J cation: 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 
Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 

11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 
Church school 10 a. m. Harry 

Jarbo, Supt. 
We invite you to worship with 

us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, SUpt. - 
Morning WOrsWp 11 a. m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. (CWT) # 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.> 
Services each Sunday. You , are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



USE 

6*6 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 




Baty 

etucU 



AH leading breeds V. 8. 
Approved. Blood-tested, started chicks one, two »nd 
three weSm old. Prices right. Atop_ Sexed chickj. 
rREECATALOG.Wrife: KtHTUCKV HATCHERY 

SXT WEST FOOBTH STBEET • LEXINGTON, KKNTUCKT 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pas tor 

Sunday School 10:0 0a. m. ( CWT) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT ) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 

Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. for Juniors 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

^ , ■ 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaugh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:90. 
You need your church. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, P astor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Saturday ^evening 
at 7:30 CWT. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAR 

CHURCH 
Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School eve'ry Sunday at. 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer KidwelL Pastor 

"* S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 

Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 

WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Alrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 8:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m. EWT. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. 

Preaching first and third Sun. 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at-, 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed Shlnkle, Supt. 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:80 
a. m. 

Evening Service at 7»80 (C.W.T.) 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p. m. 



uck with awe 

"times the de- 
our Lord so 
d power that, 

rriore { deeply 

by the perils 

ether mas- 

anding unseen 



JESUS UJES H; POWER 

'°^/ 

LESSON TEX"— Mark jfc35-41; 5:3543. 
GOLDEN TEJ r— Whjg&are ye so tearful? 
How is it that y^-have nMtaith? — Mark 4:40. 

Help— that is whiSk man needs, 
and nothing but the pOwer of Christ 
will suffice to aeet his fears and sor- 
rows. Christ/ appears , in Mark as 
not only the ,tnatchless Teacher of 
the parables we have just studied, 
but the might r Worker. 

This Is thte Jospel in which Christ 
is presented *ls the Servant of Je- 
hovan, who came to tse His infinite 
grace and power for < it deliverance. 

Two great f ars gr vat the vitals 
of man's existence. Life is full of 
awful dangers, and- death is so 
dreadfully, fir il and JbrrowfuL He 
is afraid to 1 ye, andWraid to die- 
apart from Ms faithA Jesus Christ. 
We find the answen to both these 
fears as we h^re see — 

Jesus' Poi sr Overcomes 

I. Fear ofLife's Dangers (Mark 
4:35-41). 

The long d? y of teaching had end- 
ed (v. 35), vjid the disciples car- 
ried out His fisquest that they go to 
the other side of the lake to rest. 
Just "as he w is" they departed, and 
before long Vhe ti ed Jesus was 
asleep. We know r w He felt, and 
what is eve ) mp blessed, He 
knows how i *e fe« when we are 
tired. \e 

As He slept a sucf^n storm (com- 
mon on the L ke of fflalilee) brought 
deathly fear, to th*1hearts of His 
disciples. Fq£ the flWment they saw 
only the angrij wavK the smallness 
of their boat, Bid th«r hopelessness of 
their situation* 

Had they forgotten Jesus? With 
Him in the boat, they had no reason 
to fear. They called on Him, and in 
His majestic and authoritative 
"Peace be stiT' the wind and waves 
recognized th ir Master's voice. 

Should we ''fiot learn that in this 
day of fears and alarms, we may 
(if we are Christians) count on His 
presence and His power. If we look 
at the overwhelming waves of cir- 
cumstances and think how frail we 
are, surely our hearts shall fail us 
for fear. Bu' if Christ is with us, 
we are in no^dange 

Now they were s 
at His power "Soj 
liverances wrought 
reveal His presence 1 
His followers are; 
moved than fiey wi 
which threal ned. 
tering the sttjsjrn, or 
in our midst today, He appears to 
the eye of faith, clothed in divine en- 
ergy and power" (Erdman). 

II. Fear of Death's Deep Sorrow 
(5:35-43). 

Trouble is a visitor in every home, 
it does not m tter how securely that 
home may- 1 founded upon wealth 
or social pos ^on. Frequently, death 
chooses a shaping mgrk in taking a 
dearly belov^fc child, Children strike 
their roots <wp intc our hearts and 
when they me tor from us our 
whole beings are re? and convulsed. 
Such was the great form of sorrow 
which had come upii the home of 
Jairus, leading hina, to- make the 
brave step c " faith flp-id hope which 
brought him o Jest©.' 

Then as J sus tuflied to go with 
Jairus a wormian todthed Him. He 
stopped to s#ek her out and com- 
mend her foWher faith. The seem- 
ing delay must have greatly troubled 
Jairus, particularly when the ser- 
vants came and informed him that 
he need no longer trouble the Master 
since his daughter was dead. Not 
infrequently we have similar expe- 
riences, where it seems that while 
God has pror ised to help us, He has 
been turned side and has forgotten 
us. The psa; jiist in Psalm'42:3 cries 
out, "My tears hav» been my meat 
day and nighiwhilr hey continually 
say unto meQWien s thy God?" 

Our Lord was no, troubled at all 
by the message of the servants of 
Jairus, but He showed His thought- 
ful consideration off the father by 
reassuring him witrijhe words, "Fear 
not, only believe." £ 

Everywheii fear blocks the way 
of human p> ice and progress. Di- 
vine wisdorr pffers a remedy for it 
all — only behave. We excuse our lack 
of faith by the conditions which con- 
front us, bu^ none of us face condi- 
tions worse vian those which con- 
fronted Jairus. His daughter Was 
dead and he was told to believe! He 
obeyed and his faith was rewarded. 

When He said, "The child is not 
dead, but sleepeth," our Lord did 
not mean that actual death had not 
taken place, but He meant that in 
the sight of Gfod death is like a sleep. 
In the eyes of Christ spiritual death 
was undoubtedly f r more terrible 
than physical death A man may be 
physically alive at yet being spir- 
itually . dead be \ jrse off than a 
man who, though physically dead, is 
spiritually alive. f 

After putting foflp the mourning 
scorners, the Low performed a 
miracle by simply speaking to the 
child and saying, "Little girl, arise." 

Here then is the Lord who can 
overcome e^ry fear, in both life 
and death. *s He not the one we 
need as our Saviour? 



5 
FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF JA>TCJARY 27, 1904 






Richwood 

The many friends of Mrs. Effie 
Rice and Mrs. Maud Norman 
sympathize with them in the loss 
of their infants. 

John J. Tanner, who has been 
on the sick list is better. 
Commissary 

C. H. Acra, Ben Kirtley, Colum- 
bus Popham, and Mrs. Georgia 
Louden transacted business in 
Aurora, last Monday. 

A. E. Chambers of Petersburg, 
was the pleasant guest of Mrs. 
Lurenia Scott, last Friday. 
Belleview 

John Deck of Woolper, was in 
our town Friday. His daughter, 
Alice, who has been with Mrs. Alice 
Cook, returned home with them. 

Ray Conner, of Cincinnati, is 
visiting his sister and brother-in- 
law, John Portwood and wife, of 
Waterloo. 

Hathaway 

John Connley, of Gallatin coun- 
ty was visiting his sister, Mrs. 
Ryle, who very ill. 

Mrs. Caroline Ryle, of Beech 
Grove, is not expected to live very 
long. 

Verona 

Mrs. John Cotton, who died near 
Independence, Was brought to 
New Bethel Cemetery for inter- 
ment, Monday. 

Mr. George Roberts is busy re- 
ceiving tobacco now. 

Gunpowder * 

Ben Riley has recovered from a 
sprained ankle, which he sustain- 
ed a couple of weeks ago. 

E. H. Surface and family were 
guests at B. C. Surface's, last Sat- 
urday. 

Idlewild 

Charlie Allen has left C. E. 
Stephens to engage in business in 
Newport. 

Wm. Hedges and wife Spent 
Monday with Mrs. George Walton 
and on Tuesday they visited your 
correspondent. 

Walton 

It is a fine girl that came to 
gladden the home of Mr. and 
Mrs, Edwin Johnson, last Thurs- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ran Rouse, with 
a charming dinner, entertained 



Mrs. Sidney Hume, Mrs. M. G. 
Rouse, Mr. Howard Smith and Mr. 
and Mrs. W. A. Smith, last Thurs- 

day ' 

Buffalo 

Claude Utz and sister entertain- 
ed their cousins, Misses Bernice 
and Eunice Johnson, last Saturday 
and Sunday. 

Ora, little daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clark Rouse, has been very 
sick for several days. 

Union 

Mary Elizabeth and Kathryn 
Hicks entertained Eugenia Riley 
several days this week. 

Miss Helen Tanner spent sever- 
al days this week with her sister, 
Mrs. Wolf, of Richwood. 
Crescent 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Cave Car- 
penter, on the 18th a girl. 

H. W. Northcutt, of Pt. Pleasant 
spent Saturday and Sunday with 
his parents, of this place. 
Landing 

George Kite, who has been liv- 
ing on John F. Green's farm, has 
moved to this place. 

T. B. Wilson, who sustained in- 
juries on the ice several weeks 
ago is able to be out again. 

Burlington 

Johnnie Duncan left last Friday 
morning for Macon, Ga., where 
he has a good position with a gen- 
tleman, who handles a great many 
trotting horses. 




BULLITTSVILH CHRISTIAN 
CHUI ""E 

Noble Lucas, Minister 
Preaching 2nd «fed 4th Sundays 

at 11 a. m. ted 800 p. m. 
Church School very Sunday at 

10 a. m. Ben Kot tnyer, Supt. 




NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
9 hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

, the first man you meet. 



Ill llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llll 

CREDIT 



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given on 



ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 

i Phone ERL. 87 Ambulance Service = 

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A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

■ •. I 

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that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 
elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 



THARP & STI 






FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 




LET IIS EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAV 



LJMETZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 

63/ Madison Ave.. Co vin gfon. H 




THE BOONE COUNT? RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



V 




THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



. 




3m 



— 



FLORENCE 



I 



We are sorry to report that our 
barber P. E. Bennett has been con- 
fined to his home the past week 
on account of illness. 

Mrs. Maud Dugan, of Sparta, 
called on Mrs. Mary E. Rouse, Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Gaines of 
Walton visited Rev. O. M. Huey 
and wife and other friends here 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Mrs. Clayton Brown and son, of 
Covington spent the week-end 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John T. Stephenson. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Houston, who 
have been residing at Limaburg, 
have moved to their home on Sun- 
set Ave., Erlanger, where they will 
spend the winter. 
' Mr. and Mrs. Tony Howard and 
childern moved to their new home 



POSTED i. 

x All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

J. W. Marsh, Woolper Creek, Bur- 
lington, R. 2. 

Robert S. Hood Estate, Constance 
Ky. 

NOTE— Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



recently purchased front Arthur 
Betts and wife on Erlanger Road. 
We regret to lose them from our 
midst. 

Mrs. Amanda Aylor and son 
Bobbie visited her brother Hobe 
Roberts and family, Wednesday 
afternoon. \ 

Mrs. Lutie Aylor passed the week 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Clore, of Belleview. 

Uncle Ezra Aylor is improving, 
we are glad to report. 

Several from this community 
have sold their tobacco. AH re- 
ceived high prices. 

Mrs. Sophia Jones entertained 
the Ladies' Aid of the M. E. church 
on Thursday, at her home on Dor- 
tha Ave. 

Dr. L. E. Rouse and wife, of 
Ludlow and Mrs. Ella Weaver and 
Mrs. Eva Delahunty of Lloyd Ave., 
visited Mary E. Rouse, Sunday aft- 
ernoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor enter- 
tained with a six o'clock dinner 
Saturday evening in compliment 
of Karl Kleeman, of Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. P. Kerns were 
dinner guests Saturday of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Thompson, of Walton. 

John Snelling and family, of 
Petersburg called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold Aylor, Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Kendle. Of 
Erlanger were Saturday evening 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Russ. 

Mrs. Grace Acra and Mrs. Emma 
Griggs were shopping in Coving- 
ton, Monday. 

Pvt. Louis Cecil Riddle and wife, 
stationed in Florida, arrived here 
for a brief visit with relatives. 

Mrs. Robert H. England left Sat- 
urday for a few days' visit with 



her. husband,' Robert England who 
is at Great Lakes Training Sta- 
tion. 

Miss Janet Brothers was called 
to the bedside of her grandmother, 
Mrs. Jennie Brothers, of Newport, 
who is quite ill. 

Rev. Bruce Easterday and wife 
and mother Mrs. Harry Tanner 
have returned to their home fol- 
lowing a few days' visit at Akron, 
O., with Rev. Easterday's parents. 
His mother has been quite ill.. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Dugan, of 
Sparta, visited Chas. Beall and this 
scribe, Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Ambrose of 
Burlington R. 1, spent Friday with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. 
tephenson and Mrs. Ambrose re- 
ained for a few days' visit with 
mother, who has been quite ill 
past week. 

ord has been received from 

Wallace Tanner, who is sta- 

at Shreveport, La., that he 

n a patient the, past month 

army hospital, suffering 

infection of the elbow. He 

of Mrs. Belle Tanner, of 




eg 

I 




mmmmmmimmmMmMmimmmMm^Mmm 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

icHOCKETToo. 






DIXIE HIGHWAY ot Graves 

ERLANGER 

MANAGER.: GEORGE FLEMING 



Suburban jewelers exclusively 
with modern stores in: 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD •MADISONVILLE. 




I 

I 
I 



I 

I 

I 
I 

i 

1 
I 

I 



i 



fmrmMFMlWE r tMM^^Stf9f^ 



UBLIC 



tion 
has 
in th 
from 
is a 
Kentato 

CharleS Popham, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Popham, of Sanders 
Drive has. returned to his home fol- 
lowing an appendectomy. He is 
doing nicely. 

Mrs. Maggie Wilson, of Union en- 
joyed several days' visit last week 
with Mrs. Maggie Clarkson, of Mt. 
Zion Road. 

Mrs. Octavia pay is enjoying a 
visit with her brother W. L. Step- 
hens and wife. 

Mrs. Eva Smith was dinner 
guest Wednesday oj^ Mrs. Maggie 
Clarkson. • 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
William Fox's little son Billy Dale 
is a patient in Booth Hospital! He 
is doing nicely at this writing we 
are glad to report. 

Mrs. John M. Connley and sons 
spent Sunday with her aunt, Mrs. 
Grant Moddox and family, of De- 
von. 

The large circle of friends of 
Mrs. John T. Stephenson of Price 
Pike will regret to learn of he* 
illness at her residence. We wis& , 
for her a speedy recovery. 

The many friends of Mrs. Mabel 
Morris Garnett regret to learn of 
her illness, $he past week. 

Charles (Buster) Scott, Jr., ar- 
rived here Saturday from Chicago 
to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Scott and family, of Dixie 
Highway. 

Mrs. Emma Cleek had for her 
guests one day last week, her 
brother, N. H. Clements, of near 
Union. 

Henry Smith was dinner guest 
Sunday of Chas. Beall. 

We are sorry to hear that Ben 
Carl Aylor is a patient in Good 
Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Chester Tanner has pur- 
chased the Ed Newman property in 
Florence and will move there in 
the near future. 

Anyone having news items for 
this column, please leave at Ed Os- 
born's or Florence Drug Store on 
Monday morning. 

Mrs. Floyd Sininger left Thurs- 
day for Germantown, Ky., where 
she was called on account of the 
serious illness of her mother. Mrs. 
Craycraft. 

Mrs. Russell Lucks has accepted 
a position as clerk in McAlphin's in 
Cincinnati. 

Joe Taylor, son of Mrs. Emma 



Taylor, of Shelby St., arrived here 
Monday to spend a few days. He is 
stationed in California. 

Mrs. Laverne Sayers, of Oakley, 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. L. B. Simpson of Dixie High- 
way. 

Wilford Aylor and family, of 
Aurora, Ind., spent Sunday with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ezra 
Aylor. 

The many friends of Mrs. Maggie 
Clarkson were glad to see her out 
after a recent illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Cook and family 
moved Monday to the property of 
Henry Smith vacated by Tony 
Howard and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Newman was 
the recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben Northcutt. 

. Dode Pope, of Covirj£ton visited 
relatives here, Sunday.* 

Mrs. L. B. Simpson, >lrs. Russell 
Lucks and mother, Mrs. Kleemire 
and this writer visited Mrs. Ed 
Newman, Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Wilma Rogers left Saturday 
to visit her husband, who is sta- 
tioned in Virginia. 



EAS* BEND 



Stand Up Straight 


■ — --'■ 



Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Dobb had as 
their guests Saturd j, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bernice Carson *md children 
of Covington. ft. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jesse* Lee Bagby 
called on his mother .Mr. and Mrs. 
Nat Bagby, Sunday. \ 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellison Rector en- 
tertained with a six o'clock supper 
in honor of Mrs. Fleta Wagner, 
Mrs. Bill Jorg, and Miss Marcella 
Recta, of Sayler Park Ohio. 

Mrs. Lucian Stepher 3 spent Sat- 
urday night with h^ daughter, 
Mrs. William Wallace^ 

Mary Helen and Ixffetta Rector 
entertained the folkmng Sunday 
afternoon: Miss Ruth VanVezel, 
Miss Betty Jane Portwood and S. 
Barnett. 

Mr. Rouse of Burlington is help- 
ing Mr. C. E. Cobb strip tobacco. 

Mrs. Ernest Brown has received 
notice that her son Milton has ar- 
rived at a camp in No -th Carolina. 

Mrs. Ellison Recto called on 
Mrs. William Wallace Friday aft- 
ernoon. 



HARDWARE HEART", 
KILLS 




COWS 






I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE OLD 
MALLIE BEEMON FARM LOCATED ONE 



AND THREE-FOURTHS 
HOPEFUL CHURCH ON 



MILES 

- 



WEST OF 



Sat, Jan. 



AT 1:00 P.M. 



\* 



lisc 






harrow: 



< i 



The following : Six milch : cows ; 
sled; 1 McCormick-Deering mowing machine, 
No. 7; McCormick-Deering hay rake; hinge har- 
row; McCormick-Deering hillside plow, with 
cutter; laying off plow; Oliver Chill turning 
plow, No. 20; one Rastus Plow; 2-horse riding 
cultivator; pair check lines; some hay and corn; 
milk cans; one goat, 9 months old; two 8-gallon 
stone crocks; and other items too numerous to 
mention. 






TERMS— CASE 



WILLIAM 

OWNER 
COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



U. S. War Department 

Certification of Authority 

AG 095 Expires Aug. 10, 

1945 

USEFUL 

NEEDS 

FOR 

Service 
men 

FURLOUGH BAGS - 

ROLL KITS - APRON KITS 

SHOE SHfNE KITS 

SEWING KITS 

MONEY BELTS 

GARRISON CAPS 

OVERSEAS CAPS 

TIES - BELTS - SWEATERS 

CHEVRONS - COLLAR ENSIGNIA 

SHOULDER PATCHES 

SERVICE RIBBONS 

GARRISON BELTS 

EF-KO 

Army Store 

508 MADISON AVE. 

Near 5th COVINGTON Near 5th 



N. TULCH 

\ Foot Comfort Specialist at — 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



- Standing and sitting erect re- 
quire less muscular effort than the 
slumped posture for the normal, 
healthy person. With the body in 
an erect attitude the center ■ of 
gravity passe"s more nearly through 
the center of the body and places 
the ^weight on bones and liga- 
merffeg^hat are by nature equip- 
ped tfltMieet this demand. When 
the hea\ slumps forward, the 
shoulders \droop, the spine curves 
and the abdomen bulges; then 
muscles muV take on more and 
more of tnJsV burden , of weight 
bearing, a bumen for fatigue and 
later actual detormity of certain 
of the bones and^joints. 

The first necessity in good pos- 
ture is good feet. 

Show me a person with good 
posture and bad feet. It's almost 
impossible. 

But show me a person with good 
posture and I'll show you a per- 
son with good feet, for good posture 
starts with good feet. The found- 
ation of any super structure is 
the most important. 

Don't suffer another day with 
your feet. 

No matter how many shoes or 
trial supports you- have tried, try 
just one more and have one of our 
foot comfort specialists make a 
free foot analysis and show you 
how to get rid of all foot pains, leg 
pains, backaches and headaches. 
Even artritis and rheumatism 
pains are often mistaken — most 
times when feet are corrected the 
pains vanish. We know we can 
help you to stand up straight. — 
Adv. 



VERONA 

(Delayed) 

Unusually cold weather prevails 
for this winter, and although we've 
had some snow and a little rain, it 
is still dry and water is scarce. 

Word received from Mr. and 
Mrs. D. O. Hudson states they are 
enjoying their stay in -Hot Springs, 
Arkansas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holton, of Win- 
chester have moved to the Ray- 
mond Hull farm. 

The W. M. S. met at the church 
last Wednesday for their regular 
meeting. 

Most of the tobacco has been 
taken to market from this com- 
munity. • 

Mrs. O. K. Powers is spending a 
few days at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lefty Shelter and 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Steele , and 
daughter and Rita Roberts spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. J. T. 
Roberts. 

Tom Dwyer passed away sud- 
denly at his home, Monday morn- 
ing. 



Many cattle are lostfjevery winter j 
from swallowing nails, ^staples, bits I 
of wire or other metal 'objects, ac-| 
cording to veterinarians at the I 
Kentucky Agricultural Experiment 
Station. These, objects lodge In 
the second stomach, and some of 
them work through into the heart, 
killing the animals. 

Cattle often swallow >its of wire 
that break off when \ jiling wires 
are removed. Other w>jects that 
may cause death of tfjestock are 
nails, screws, bolts, ^nuts, razor 
blades, hair pins, coins, needles and 
buttons. 

Sometimes whole handfuls of 
metal objects are removed from a 
cow's stomach, the accumulation 
of months or even years. 

Food factories'* now u ;e magnets 
to remove metal A ot gets from 
f rains and groun \ feed, It is con- 
sidered good practice \t examine 
home-made feeding mixtures. The 
Experiment Station rnjin point to 
the need of care in u^baling hay 
and in handling nails; -staples and 
other metal materials around feed 
bins and troughs. 



BIG BONE W. M. U. 

The January meeting of the Big 
Bone W. M. U. was held at the 
home of Frances Aylor, with the 
enrolling of one new member. 
There were eight members and 
several visitors present. 

After a fine social morning arid 
a grand lunch, the meeting began 
by singing "Living for Jesus," fol- 
lowed with the devotional from 
the Beatitudes, and a discussion on 
our watchword, "That The Gener- 
ation to Come Might Know," by 
Mrs. Bertha Huff and prayer by 
Mrs. Mae Harrison. 

After repeating of our watch- 
words there was discussion on the 
characteristics of the citizens of 
the Kingdom by Frances Aylor, 
Mary Frances Edwards, Jane Aylor 
and Mrs. Mary Aylor. 

We then had our business session 
with reports, etc., followed with a 
prayer for our shut-Ins by Mrs. 
Bertha Huff, arid dismissed with 
prayer by Jane Aylor. 

May the Lord lead us in a great 
way to "make known His mighty 

acts and the glorious majesty of 
His kingdom," during this com- 
ing year. 

-^Publicity Chairman. 






MUD LICK CREEK 

(Delayed) 



Mr. and Mrs. William Sutton and 
son spent Sunday and Monday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sutton and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Sutton and 
Judy Ann spent Monday in Cincin- 
nati. 

Miss Jane Sutton left Friday 
morning for Mississippi to visit her 
sister, Mrs. Remley Williams, whe 
is stationed there with her hus- 
band Pvt. Remley Williams. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Langhorstand 
family were week-end guests of 
Mrs. Clara Smith. 
Charles Allphin called on the 
Suttons, Saturday. Other callers 
were Mr. and Mrs. George Allphin 
and "daughter and Mrs. Pearl All- 
phin. 



ADMINISTRATRIX' NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Lloyd D. McGlas- 
son, deceased are requested to 
present same properly proven, ac- 
cording to law, and all persons in- 
debted to the said estate are re- 
quested to call and settle with the 
undersigned. 

Mrs. Pearl McGlasson, 
31-2t-c Administratrix 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Dora Mitchell Kin- 
dred, deceased, are re juested to 
present same, properly proven ac- 
cording to law, and all jersons in- 
debted to the ss id estate are re- 
quested to call a d settle with the 
undersigned, hm ediatftry. 

Wilford S*Mitchell, 
32-2t-p ■ Administrator 

g 



COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
47 Dixie Highway • -:- Erlanger, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

WAYNE FEEDS — RED JACKET COAL 

READY MIXED CONCRETE 

CONCRETE BLOCKS 



AFTER SELLING YOUR TOBACCO, STOP AND 
SEE OUR LINE OF TARPAULINS 
All sizes — Prices reasonable. 
WE DO REPAIRING * 

Covington Awning & Roofing Co. 

l / 2 sq. south of Kenton Loose Leaf Warehouse 

301 Scott St, Covington, Ky. Hiland 1735 





FARMERS REWARD 

WORKING 4-H BOY 

Allen Turner, a 4-H club boy in 
McCracken county, was given a $25 
war bond by the county Farm Bu- 
reau for doing' the best job in the 
labor service project last summer. 
Allen worked 740 hours in food pro- 
duction on his father's farm, and 
then helped neighbors for 462 
hours. Farm Agent Joe Hurt re- 
ports that the- work accomplished 
by 4-H club boys and girls in this 
project was equivalent to that of 
75 men working 10 hours a day for 
142 days. 




" I ' j 

HE'S BACK ! 



" 



e's done his part and 
more— have you? 



• 



They're coming back — the gallant men who've 
been wounded in action. 






Tell them the war's as good as won and that 
there's no need to buy more War Bonds. 

They know first-hand what invasion costs in 
blood and lives and money. They know the 
real fight's just began . . . that wishful thinking 
can prolong the war and waste thousands of 
lives needlessly. 

They're looking to us to keep on backing the 
attack ... to help get it over sooner by pro- 
viding the overwhelming weight of arms it 

takes to win. 

• 

We can't match their sacrifice but we can show 
them we're in the fight by buying extra War 
Bonds during the Fourth War Loan.' 

Buy at least one extra $100 dollar bond now . . . 
and keep on buying Bonds until Victory. 

This sticker in your 
window shows you 
bought extra War 
Bonds daring the 
Fourth War Loan. 
It's your battle flag 
here at home. 



\ 







U&A* BACK THE ATTACK! 



This dvertisement Sponsored as a Contribution to Victory by 

COMMJUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



■ 






* 



I M C OHf OWATl 



A 






\ 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 













y 



/ 



M 






niiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiHiminiirrniiniiiiiiiiii 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

llllilllllllllllliiillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Miles Goodridge, 
ASN 35260216, Btry B. 92nd P. A. 
Bn., APO 252, care Postmaster, New 
York, N. T.j 

"For sometime I've wanted to 
write and thank you again for the 
paper. Since I last wrote a lot has 
happened, but at last I might say 
I'm somewhat settled. I am in 
England now and like it fine. It's 
almost like home, after spending 
so many months with the Arabs. 

"The trip from Africa was some- 
thing I'll never forget, but was glad 
to leave the place. 

'"Again Pete, I want to thank you 
for the paper, I enjoy it very much 
k and it keeps me up on the home 
news. Some of the news I noticed 
wasn't so good in regards to the 
two boys missing. I knew both and 
was very sorry to learn of the re- 
po#- 

''There isn't much news, or rath- 
er they wont let you write any, so 

I had better close." 

• • • 

Cpl. Emil D. Hoffman, ASN 205- 
43100, Bty C 103 (AAA) AW Bn., 
APO 230, care Postmaster, New 
York, N. Y., writes: 

"I am writing this letter thank- 
ing you and many friends, who 
make it possible for me to receive 
our home town paper over here. 

"You know Pete, when a fellow 
has put in twenty-one months 
overseas, some of them being a 
little difficult at times, he thinks 



a lot about home. When he receives 
news about home in letters or pap- 
ers—especially your paper, it makes 
his heart glad to see that people 
back home still think about him 
and are behind him one hundred 
percent. All this he knows will 
help to bring him home sooner to 
all of his friends and loved ones. 

The Recorder has informed me 
of the whereabouts of many of the 
local boys who left home to Join 
the Armed Forces, of whom I have 
often thought. I'm hoping to run 
into a few of them soon. I know 
what they feel like. We've been 
over here quite some time and it 
gets mighty hot, and not from the 
sun. 

"I met Lents Harrison from 
Union, but I only got to see him a 
couple of days. I really felt good 
seeing someone from home. 

"I am now in England for the 
second time. I saw in the paper 
about Ray Brooks and a few other 
boys, but they can bet their bottom 
dollar we will make it up for them 
before next July. 

"Tell all my friends hello for me." 

Mrs. Carl Roehm (nee Stephens) 
of Lawrenceburg, Ind.,. has receiv- 
ed word from her brother, Major 
W. G. Stephens, that he has been 
promoted to Lieut. Colonel. 

Lieut. Col. Stephens is stationed 
at Patterson Field, having been 
transferred there from Mobile, Ala. 
He is a graduate of West Point 
Military Academy. 
* < • 

The following letter was received 
from Sgt. Ernest L. Hager, Btry A 
862nd AAA AW Bn., APO 937, care 
Postmaster, Seattle, Washington: 





* 


H 








. 





NOTIC 



The 1944 dog licenses are now due and every dog 
in Boone County must have a license. The Boone 
County Fiscal Court has instructed the Sheriff 
to collect all dog licenses at once, due to the fact 
that the Live Stock Fund is more than one year 
behind in paying the claims for sheep that were 
killed by dogs. Please obtain this license at 
once so that you will not have to pay the penalty. 

J. T. WILLIAMS 

SHERIFF OF BOONE COUNTY, KENTUCKY 



"Will attempt a short letter In 
regard to my recent change of ad- 
dress. I am now stationed at Fort 
Oreely, Kodiahk, and would like to 
inform you ot my new APO num- 
ber which is 937. 

"I will be unable to disclose 
much information as to my pres- 
ent location, but will add that I 
like it very much, as living condi- 
tions* here are much better than 
I have been used to in the past 
several months. ■ 

"As it happens three years ago 
today I left Boone County as a 
volunteer for the service. Little 
did I know I would be in this long, 
but will say I tio not regret a single 
day of my service for such a 
worthy cause. 

"Being a communication Serg- 
eant for the past two years, I have 
received and sent a lot of news, but 
jnone of it touched me quite like 
the news I received from The Re- 
corder. As I am the only one in 
service stationed here that I know 
of from Boone County. The Re- 
corder is about the only source of 
news I have from the other Boone 
County boys stationed all over the 
whole universe. 

"I want to thank you for send- 
ing me The Recorder, and may I 
use this to say 'hello' to all my 
friends." , 

• • •' 

Pfc. Hobert Willoughby, Jr., ASN 
35801269, Btry C, 770 F. A. Bn., 
Camp Bowie, Texas, writes: "A few 
lines this morning to let you know 
that everything is swell and that 
maneuvers are over, so ^e' are go- 
ing back to Camp Bowie.'Texas for 
a while — how long, no one knows. 
."I sure hope our .outfit goes 
across soon, as staying on this side 
of the pond doesn't help win the 
war and that is what everybody 
wants. 

"I can't say much about Louis- 
iana maneuvers, except that it is 



shoes and keep the tent looking 
nice for us.. In return we give 
them a pack .of cigarettes and 
teach them a little English. They 
all say after the war- they want to 
go to America. ' They're not alone 
there, we also want to go to -Amer- 
ica after the war, but they'll prob- 
ably get there before us. 

Sgt. Black is sitting right beside 
me and he asked me to put in a 
round about way that both of us 
are the proud owners of the Good 
Conduct ribbon. We're the only 
two that came in together that re- 
ceived this honor. But just between 
us, Uncle Sam can have all the rib- 
bons he wants, all we want is to 
come home, and we're going to 
come home too. 

"We sure would like to be back 
home in Boone County to do some 
hunting. All the boys we hear 
from are always telling us about 
the good game they are getting. 
We're after more important game, 
and 30-30 shells aren't rationed 
and we don't need a hunting li- 
cense to hunt Germans. 

"Robert Stevens is still doing his 
part. I haven't seen him for two 
months, but I do write him. Our 



plenty rugged." 

» « * 

The following letter was receiv- 
ed from Pvt. Robert T. Cain and 
Sgt. George Black, 338th Engrs. APO 
600, care Postmaster, New York, 
N. Y:: 

"We have been receiving The 
Recorder and thought we would 
take time to write you a few lines 
to thank you for sending the paper 
because it really helps a lot-^iot 
only us, but there are several other 
fellows look forward to reading it. 

"Everything is pretty well un- 
der control over here. Of course 
you know we can't write and let 
you know what's going on as much 
as we would like to, but Pete Black 
and I are both on the night shift 
and like our work very muchJBlack 
is the boss on the job and I'm an 
aid man, and I have it pretty, easy 
and so do the Sergeants. 

There are three prisoners who 
come over every day and shine our 



AUCTION 



about four times a day. It must 
be love! 

"Well I believe I better thank you 
once m£re for the paper, because 
it's really a morale builder, and it 
would be awful hard to do without 
it. We'll say so-long and will write 

again soon." 

* » • 



mail service is none" too good, but 
our Xmas boxes all got here be- 
fore Xmas and that helped a lot. 
Thanks again for the paper and 
here's hoping we 1 ave old Hitler 
saying 'Uncle' by t^e fall of this 
year. It can't be < 3 soon for us. 
Almost two years I er here now 
and I know I've tr\ elled by land 
and sea over twenty thousand 
miles in that period of time. 
Here's hoping for tjfi best for "44." 

"1 
Charles E. Nixon, "Elmer L. Snell- 

ing, both of Petersburg, newly in- 
ducted personnel of the United 
States Army have been sent for- 
ward from the Reception Center at 
Fort Thomas, Ky., to Camp Croft, 
S. C, according to a report from 

the Public Relations Division. 
» * » 

Pvt. H. Everett Monteith, Co. D, 
12th Battalion, Camp Wheeler, Ga., 
writes: • " » 

' V T want to, thank you for send- 
ing me your' interesting paper. I 
certainly enjoy reading it, as it 
helps keep me informed of what is 
going on back home. I wish all of 
you and the people of Boone Coun- 
ty the best of luck. 



regiment has split up and he isn't \ "I hope we can get this war over 
with us. Paul Clore Is still kick- jkrith in a hurry, so we all may have 
ing and writing Miss V. Horton [peace and freedom again. 

, "I would like to hear from all of 
friends. I will answer all letters." 



> ' 



. 



In order to settle the estate of the late Albert Shields, I will sell 
at Public Auction, at the Albert Shields farm, located 4 miles 
southwest of Union on the Big Bone Church road, on 






The following: Eight milch cows, one to be fresh in February, 
one in March, 3 in May, 1 in June and 2 in September; one year- 
ling heifer; one team of work horses, will work anywhere; one 
work mule; 2 road wagons; 1 disc harrow; 1 Vulcan breaking 
plow; one 2-horse sled; 1 hay rake; 1 three-shovel plow; 1 single 
shovel plow; 1 two-horse tobacco setter; one scalding box; 4 sets 
of work harness; collars, bridles, check lines; 1 vise; chains; 
hoes; forks; posthole digger; 1 ten-gallon, milk can; 1 cream 
separator; one milk can washer; small tools; one Oliver break- 
ing plow ; and some household goods. 

TERMS MADE KNOWN ON DAY OF SALE 






LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS 



Beckham Shields, Admr. 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Pfc. Charles R. 
Wood, ASN 35796445, 3rd G* S. S. 
Class 44-10, Laredo Army Air Field, 
Laredo, Texas: 

"Just a few lines to say hello to 
you and all my Boone County 
friends and to thank you for send- 
ing the good old paper regularly. 
Although I've been here for about 
four weeks now, I've received one 
Recorder and it really was wel- 
come. I'm sending my -new ad- 
dress Pete, so I'll be looking for 
The Recorder soon. 

"I've just started to school this 
week. The course lasts seven 
weeks and if I make the grade 
I'll receive my Gunner's Wings 
when I graduate. Then, if the 
rule is not changed by- then, I'll 
be home for a. ten-day leave. That's 
what I'm really looking forward 
to, getting back to good old Boone 
County again. 

"This is a nice field; here and 
the weather has been- warm down 
in this part of the state, but Texas 
can't begin to compare with Ken- 
tucky. 

"Again let me thank you for 
the paper and tell all my friends, 

hello." . 

* • * 

Aubrey E. Knox, with the Fifth 
Army in Italy, writes: 

"Just a few lines to thank you 
for sending me the paper and to 
let you know of a change in my 
APO number. This makes about 
five times my number has chang- 
ed. 

"I enjoy reading the column for 
the boys in the service, but would 
like to hear more from some of 
the fellows over here where it's 
'hot' .and 'cold' at the same time. 
(Hot lead and cold Weather). To- 
night is the first time it has been 
comfortable for three weeks — too 
much snow and rain to live like 
anything but a dog. 

Up where the shells fly you don't 
have big fires and Ijghts at night 
and it's not a bad idea to keep 
them down au tne time either. 
We get a laugh at some of the re- 
strictions on 'maneuvers' and 
blackouts at home. We do smoke 
our cigarettes at night and used 
to have our picture shows outdoors 
at night. We paid no heed to the 
fact Jerry used to bomb us every 
day and some nights too. Don't 
think the Germans^ haven't a few 
planes left, because I've seen 42 
at one time dive bomb our posi- 
tions. It's a thrilling and danger- 
ous positions to see those birds dive 
at you knowing that when he pulls 
out of the dive there's a bomb 
coming on down. 

"We boys of the 'Fighting Fifth' 
get pretty sore sometimes when we 
read about strikes and- griping 
some of our friends (?) back home 
do. We say 'Brother if you don't 
like it back there at sixty bucks a 
week we have a nice cold muddy 
foxhole complete with rifle bay- 
onet at sixty bucks a month, (if 
you live a month).' 

It's been pretty hard sledding 
since I landed at Salerno and 
that's one place I'll never forget 
as long as I live. Things were 
pretty rough there and lots of boys 
are still there. I saw some of my 
buddies get it there, and that hurts 
worse than a regular wound. A 
dead soldier laying on the ground 
isn't a very pretty sight to see. 
Most people don't realize just how 
terrible things can be. 

"This letter may sound a little 
different than most of the letters 
you print in your paper, but that's 
the way I want it. I can't agree 
with most of the fellows that 
write in and say how they love the 
Army. I haven't stood reville, in- 
spections, guard mount, or any- 
thing like that for almost a year. 
There just "isn't any place for them 
in a fighting outfit. We have 
three invasions to our credit, by 
the way. 

"My new APO number is 464, so 
please change it as my papers are 
slow enough as it is. They are 
always five weeks old or older. Our 



Lt. James C. Conner, care Of- 
ficers Mess, Camp Murphy, Fla., 
writes: "I want to take this op- 
portunity to thank you for sending 
me the Boone County Recorder. I 
have been receiving it regularly 
since I have been in the army and 
I certainly appreciate it. I also 
want to let you know that my ad- 
dress has been changed." I 

* * *1 

Nicholas S. Furnish F 2/c, Co. 
14-144 Section E., Navy Pier, Chi- 
cago, HI., writes: 

"I received my first copy of The 
Recorder today. I wa? sure glad to 
get it, as I, have miss I it a lot in 
the last month. My r friend and 
shipmate, Fred (BudljScheben re- 
ceived it while we w€fe in recruit 
training, so naturajjy the first 
thing we did was to Sit down and 
read the home news. Since then 
we have been separated and I 
haven't seen The Recorder up until 
now. 

"I want to thank you a lot for 
the paper, although I am not "a 
native of Boone County, I have 
made Hebron my home since Sep- 
tember of 1942, but want to return 
there and make it my permanent 
home. 

"I have made a lot <1 friends in 
Boone County and I nr ?st say that 
you will find no b( *,er people 
wherever you may go. have never 
had the pleasure of &jeeting you, 
but I hope that in themear future 
we will meet. $ 

"I enjoy all of the~paper but 
naturally I prefer the^, section de- 
voted to 'Our Boys in 'the Service.' 
Through, this column, we can all 
keep in contact with .each other. 

"I am now stationed at the Navy 
Pier, Chicago, 111. M: training is 
on Diesel motors. I%jget 8 weeks 
here and then will bk eligible for 
advanced training in Biesel. 

''Again I wish to thftnk you for 

The Recorder which I'enjoy a lot." 

* * * 

We are in receipt o¥ the follow- 
ing letter from Cpl. Earl Adams, 
1455 Q. M. C, Army Air Base, 
Marietta, Ga.: • 

"I want to thank you for the 
paper, for I surely do appreciate 
it. It makes you feel like you 
aren't so far from home when you 
can read the news from home every 
week. 

"I am still in Georgia and like it 
fine, because I'm closer s to home, 
and I expect to see the folks in 

February." 

* * * 

Clyde E. King, stationed with the 
Submarine Division, New York, N. 
Y., son of Mrs. Be. Zinermon, of 
Florence, writes: 

"I have just i^tur 3d from 
home, where I had 9&en n an em- 
ergency leave, as my : ither has 
been ill. When I receivej 1 my mail 
I had two of your papgB waiting 
for me and I sure wasrafed to get 
them. f\ 

"I tried to drop o er at Burling- 
ton to see you, bu! I spent most 
of the time at the ihospital with 
my mother. 

"I wish to thank you very much, 
for sending me this paper as it 
really feels good to know that you 
are not forgotten. I sure like to 
read of what all my friends in 
Boone County are doing and hop- 
ing that this is all over soon, so 
that all of the sons and daughters 
from Boone County can be back 
at the farms again, as that is what 
I am to do when I get back. Thank- 
ing you again for ffie paper, and 
saying 'hello' to gdfed old Boone 
County, I will close nop! jg to see 
you in person the next t- ae to ex- 
press my appreciation." 

Ed. Note — Clyde wou^ like to 

hear from his Boona^, County 

friends. His addresr is^jClyde E. 

King, U. S. Submarine &48 Fleet 

Postmaster, New York, n!^Y. 
« * • • - * 



BULLITTSVILLE 

Miss Mary Marshall, student 
nurse of Christ Hospital, spent 
Wednesday night with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Marshall. 

The Bullittsville Homemakers 
met for an all-day session Thurs- 
day at .the home of Mrs. Pf alzgraf , 
of Idlewild. 

Delbert Engle was able to re- 
turn to his work Monday*, after 
being quite ill the past two weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs, Harold Gilmore 
called op Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hill on 
Tuesday evening. 

We are glad to report Mrs. W. E. 
Jones much improved after suf- 
fering a severe attack of sciatic 
rheumatism. 

Miss Zelpha Nickols of Hebron, 
was the Sunday night guest of Miss 
Belva Ann Engle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson 
and family entertained his sister, 
Mrs. Grieson and children of Mays- 
ville several days last week.* 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Jones and 
children of Sharonville, spent last 
Sunday with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Jones. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reitman and 
daughters called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett Clifford, of Idlewild, Sun- 
day afternoon. » ' 

Mrs. Mamie Stephens has been 
quite ill with intestinal grippe, but 
is some better at this writing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Acra and 
daughter of Hebron and Mr. and 
Mrs. Burnam Roberts were calling 
on Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Engle and 
daughter, Saturday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Ligon have 
gone to housekeeping in an apart-; 
ment at the^home of his parents. 

Mrs. Lu'tie Graddy has returned 
home after spending several days 
with Mrs. Lizzie Kreylich and 
daughter at Idlewild. 

Cpl. Lawrence Boh enjoyed a re- j 
cent furlough with friends and 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fr^d Reitman en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Ryle and daughter and Mr. and 
Mrs. John L. Jones, Saturday even- 
ing. 



BIG BONE 



Eugene Pitcher left Friday for 
the Navy. 

John Binder, Jr., and wife and 
Eugene Binder are visiting their 
relatives Miss Lena .Binder and the 
Schwenke family. 

H. E. Miller called on the John- 
son family, Saturday. 

Wanda Lee Miller spent Saturday 
night with Betty Hamilton. 

Sorry to hear that Mrs. William 
Brown being ill. We wish for her 
a speedy recovery. 

Garfield Hamilton and wife at- 
tended a show, Sunday afternoon. 

G. W. Kite is suffering from flu. 

Virginia Miller Eads was home 
Sunday with her father and moth- 
er. 

i Mrs. Victor Jennings and son 
called on Mrs. Miller, Thursday. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



I 



PIKE STREET 
BARGAIN HOUSE 

36 Pike Street Covington 

Plaid Flannel Shirts S* .29 

for Boys JL 

Plaid Flannel Shirts S* .59 

for Men J, 

Work Shirts, Big Yank $ * .39 

Grey, Blue, Khaki JL 

Dandy Brunch Sd .69 

Coats X 

411 Head Scarfs PA 
To clear, now ..79c ^3^/C 

Sweat Shirts, now 98c 

Navy $1.19 

We Had Another Shipment of 
Ladies' Very Sheer M^%g^ 

■ 

Watch-the Number : 
36 PIKE STREET 



s'lllllll1llllllillllllllll|U|||||||!|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||U!llllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

I WASHERS REPAIRED | 

I AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

| * MAYTAG OIL 

WM. HAGEDORN 

= 856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. j 

TiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiir= 



USED CAR BARGAINS 

1941 FORD DELUXE all extras, 18,000 mi. $1075 

1937 FORD COACH $295 

1937 DeSOTO SEDAN $375 

1940 DeSOTO SEDAN, 7-passenger $1250 

1937 DODGE COACH $350 

1937 OLDSMOBILE COi^CH $375 

1937 (TWO) STUDEBAKER COUPES $350 

1936 CADILLAC , $325 

1939 HUDSON 4-DOOR $695 

1937 FORD COUPE „..$295 

1937 CHRYSLER SEDAN $295 

1939 DODGE 4-DOOR SEDAN $695 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN ...: $275 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN $245 

1938 WILLYS SEDAN ,. $325 c 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington Colonial 3884 



Milton E. Garnett, Burlington, 
newly inducted personnel of Unit- 
ed States Army has tsen sent for- 
ward from the Recep on Center at 
Fort Thomas, Ky., t^. Fort Custer, 
Mich. Milton left Ft.' .Thomas Jan- 
uary 20th, according \o the Public 
Relations Division, ff 

Schurmeier Bros, of Carrqll coun- 
ty produced more than 3,200 pounds 
of Ky. 33 tobacco on two acres, 
selling it for $54 per hundred. 



PUBILC SALE 

As I am moving to the city I will offer for sale to 
the highest bidder at my house in Florence, Ky., 
27 Banklick St., on 

FRIDAY. JAN. 28 






1:00 P.M. (CWT) 



The following: Two goose feather beds; 1 bolst- 
er; 1 Estate heatrola; several mirrors; one 9x12 
wool rug; rocking chairs; porch swing; glass 
cans; medicine cabinet; victrola and records; 1 
antique single bed; one 6-ft. extension table; 4 
chairs; kitchen cabinet; stone jars; garden plow; 
hoes and shovels; some paint; and many other 
articles too numerous to mention. 

TERMS— CASH 

LILLIAN RYLE 

OWNER 

LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



i 

• 



^^_ 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



fillllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllillllllM 

I Seen And Heard Around | 
| The County Seat 1 



BEAVER LICK 



nijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Walter Brown was in Carrollton 
several days last week, on business 



Mrs. Marie Smith spent the 
week-end with her sister, Mrs. Or- 
ville Sebree. 



Pfc. and Mrs. Charles Benson 
are the proud parents of a daugh- 
ter, born Saturday, January 22nd 



Mrs. Walter Graves and daugh- 
ter Carolyn, of Erlanger were the 
week-end guests of friends here. 



Mr. and Mrs. B. Clifton and 
daughter, of Big Bone, attended 
church here, Sunday morning. 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kelly, 
Florence, were Sunday guests 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kelly. 



of 
of 



Miss Emma May Brady, of Belle- 
vjew was a week-end guest of Miss 
Mary Bess Jarrell. 

Herbert M. Baker, of Verona, 
was in Burlington, on business, 
Monday. 



Mrs. Roscoe Curtis, i of Woolper, 
was calling on friends here, Sun- 
day afternoon. 



Mrs, James Bullock, of Hebron, 
was the Sunday guest of her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Cress. 



W 






% 



NOW L , . 

The nearest things to 

naturally curley hair 

COLD WAVE PERMANENT 

Senational No-Heat Method 

of Permanent $4 ^V®° 

Waving A \M 

Other Permanents $4.00 up 

I AROSE 

|jl ' BEAUTY SALON k 

400 Dixie H'way, Erlanger, Ky. 

Phone Erl. 6252 
Edith Amburgey, Prop. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIHIIIIIllllllllIil 

Walter Brown and Judge C. L. 
Cropper were in Frankfort, on 
business, one day last week. 



Mrs. Alva Snow, who has been 
ill with pneumonia, is not recuper- 
ing as rapidly as her friends had 
hoped. 



Pfc. Ivan Horton, of Campbell, 
Ky., is spending a furlough with 
his wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Horton and family. 



Gerald Clore, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Stanley Clore, left last Friday 
for Great Lakes, to train for the U. 
S. Navy. 



Mr. and Mrs. John E. Walton 
and daughter were Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Smith and 
family. 



Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin and 
daughter spent the week-end with 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Mullins 
and family, of Covington. 



Mrs. Eddie Smith is planning to 
leave, Thursday of this week for 
San Diego, California,, to join her 
husband, who is .stationed there 
with the U. S. Navy. 



Mrs. W. B.' Cotton and daughter 
Ruby, of Latonia, spent Saturday 
night with Mr. and. Mrs. W. L. Mc- 
Bee and son and Miss Lucile Cot- 
ton. 



Pfc. Lee Roy McNeely left last 
Thursday for Goldsboro, North Car- 
olina, after spending a furlough 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
R. McNeely. 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter Horton en- 
tertained with a nice turkey din- 
ner last Tuesday for Cpl. Ivan C. 
McCormack, wife and daughter, 
Ivan L. McCormick, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. A. Wareheim of Columbus, O., 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. McCormick, Mr. 
arid Mrs. J. B. McCormick, Davey 
Davis, and Walter Clark, of Colum- 
bus, O. 



•0XMSHXI 
N 



WAR BONDS 



CHXHXKSHXHXg 

I 



Mrs. Eddie Bowen, of Covington, 
spent Sunday with her brother 
Raymond Shields and family. 

Mrs. Margaret Beil is spending 
some time here with her daughter, 
Mrs. William Brown. 

Mrs. William Souder, of Coving 
ton visited her parents, Rev. and 
Mrs. Godbey over the week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Brown, of 
Spring Valley, Ohio, visited rela 
tives here, Sunday. 

Mrs. William Brown has been 
seriously ill of pneumonia but is 
much better now. 

Master Albert Wood is much bet- 
ter after being ill for several days. 

J. W. Conley's car was damaged 
when he ran into the rear of an- 
other car during the heavy fog last 
Tuesday. . L. 

Mrs. Jake Cleek was hostess to 
the New Haven Homemakers last 
Tuesday. Approximately ten ladies 
were present and a very enjoyable 
meeting was held. Plans were com- 
pleted for a bake sale to be held 
at Mrs. Ann Conner's Drug Store 
at Florence, Jan. 22. A number of 
the members plan to attend Farm 
and Home Week at Lexington next 
week. February 15th is the date 
of the next meeting of the club. 



DEVON 






H 

X 
H 



H 

X 
H 



H 

S 
H 

X 

£ 

M 

X 
N 
■ 
H 



Make that subscription to the Fourth War Bond 
Drive as soon as possible. 

The soldiers who are protecting us need your sup- 
port and Uncle Sam is generous enough to pay you 
interest for your money and pay back the princip- 
al at maturity. 

You can not afford not to subscribe to the limit. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 



SlSNXHXHSHXHXHXHZHXHSHXHXHZHXHXHXNXMZHZMXHXHXNXHXHSHXK 






w 






v. 



\ i 



The Home Store 

iiiiiAiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiii 

DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle ea. 6c 

PTZ POWDER * 1 lb. $1.60 

PTZ POWDER . . . . ; 5 lb. 7.50 

VANILLA WAFER COOKIES pound 25c 

GINGER SNAPS pound 15c 

FIG BARS pound 25c 

DEVIL DELIGHT pound 27c 

NUT CREME pound 35c 

ZESTA CRACKERS .pound 18c 

SALTINE CRACKERS pound 18c 

KRISPIE CRACKERS pound 18c 

HONEY GRAHAM CRACKERS pound 19c 

STAFFORD'S ORIGINAL LONG LEAF GOLDEN 

HURLEY TOBACCO SEED, ~Yi oz. 75c ' 1 oz. $1.50 

WARNER'S LARGE LEAF GOLDEN BURLEY 

TOBACCO SEED, Vt <w. 75c 1 oz $1.50 

YELLOW. STEM TWIST BUB TOBACCO SEED, y 2 oz 75c ;«1 oz 1.50 
BELL'S WHITE BURLEY TOBACCO SEED, % oz. 75c; 1 oz v 1.50 
Our plantbed fertilizer and grass seed will arrive about February 
1. See us for your spring requirements. 

KRAUT, 32 oz. can, no points each 20c 

PINEAPPLE, No. ZVi can, 36 points .each 28c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2 can, 30 points .each 25c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 qt., 14 oz. no points each 35c 

TOMATO JUICE, 46 oz.. 6 points each 25c 

PLUMS, No. ZYt can, 15 points „ each 20c 

PEACHES, No. IVt can 27 points .each 27c 

PEANUT BUTTER, pt. size each 35c 

47-m. 12-LN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD FENCE rod 55c 

26-IN. MED. WEIGHT 6-LN. STAY rod 50c 

4-FT. POULTRY FENCE rod 60c 

4-POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll $4.50 

100 LBS. 24% DAIRY $3.15 

100 LBS. 16% DAIRY $2.90 

100 LBS. SHELLED CORN \ $2.90 

100 LBS. GROUND WHEAT $2.90 

WOOD HEATING STOVES ."..;.. $5.50 to $10.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3 -room size $45.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4 -room size .$60.00 

GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Miss Kathryn Holzworth was in 
Erlanger Monday morning on busi- 
ness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
and Mrs. Maggie Glacken called 
on Mrs. Alma Glacken and family, 
of Covington. Mrs. Glacken re- 
mained for a short visit. 

Robert Wood, Dan Carpenter 
and Henry Holzworth sold their to- 
bacco crops last week. All report- 
ed good sales. 

Mrs. Henry Holzworth and 
daughter were in Covington, Tues- 
day. 

Mrs. Frank Bresser was shop- 
ping in Covington, Thursday. . 

- Robert Wood was a business vis- 
itor in Union, Thursday morning 

Word was received here of the 
marriage of Sgt. James R. (Rod) 
Glacken and Miss Louise Ransom, 
Thursday evening. Sgt. Glacken is 
stationed in Tallahassee, Fla. We 
wish for them a happy and pros 
perous life together. 

Mrs. Henry Holzworth and 
daughter were in Burlington last 
Thursday on business. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood, Ran- 
dolph, Robert Gleen and Phyllis 
Scott called on her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Noel, of Gallatin 
County, Sunday. 

Mrs. Ina Cardosi hauled her to- 
bacco Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
and daughter called on his niece. 
Mr. and Mrs. William Feldhausand 
son, Sunday. 

Mrs. Elmer Carpenter and son 
were in Erlanger, Saturday after- 
noon, shopping. 



POINT PLEASANT 



Spence 
Cincin- 






Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
entertained friends from 
nati, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wernz and 
Mr. and Mrs. Adam Wernz called 
on Mrs. Emma Wernz and Mrs. 
Josie Garnett, of Constance, Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wernz and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wernz and 
daughter entertained with a buffet 
supper Friday evening for Mr. and 
Mrs. John Dolwick. Sr., Mr. and 
Mrs. John Dolwick, Jr., and family, 
Miss Mabel Dolwick, Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl McGlasson and daughters, 



Third Class Petty Officer Roy Mc- 
Call and Mr. and Mrs. Adam 
Wernz. j 

John Beil and Lucille and Melvin 
Beil, of Burlington called on Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Wernz, Saturday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Harry Wernz donated her 
fourth pint of blood Saturday at 
the Red Cross Blood Bank, at the 
Covington Y. M. C. A. 

Mrs. Richard Spence and Mrs. 
Frank Hood attended a bingo game 
in Covington, Friday evening. 

Mrs. Richard Spence, niece and 
nephew called on Mrs. Adam Wernz 
on Friday afternoon. 

Mrs. Harry Wernz and daughter 
spent the week-end with her 
mother, Mrs. Belvia McCall, of Cov- 
ington. 



GASWJRG 



HILLTOP 



Saturday evening guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Moore, Sr., were 
W. D. Carder and daughter Edith, 
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Anderson, of 
Bromley. 

Several from our community 
attended the Clyde Barlow sale on 
Elijah Creek, Saturday afternoon. 

Miss Lillian Cress, of Burlington, 
spent Friday night with Mr. and 
Mrs. Truman Lucas. 

A. W. Rogers has returned home 
after spending a pleasant visit 
with his parents at, Atlanta, Ga. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Herbstreit, of 
Pannels Bottom, spent Sunday with 
their son, Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Herbstreit and little daughter. 

Mrs. Edna Eggleston has been on 
the sick list. 

Mrs. Wm. Buckler, of near Heb- 
ron, called on Mrs. W. D. Carder 
and daughter, Monday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
daughter Carol Ann, had as guests 
Sunday, Rev. Oliver B. Thomas and 
Supt. and Mrs. D. H. Norris, of 
Burlington. 

Callers of Mr. and Mrs. Truman 
Lucas, Sunday afternoon were Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Rouse and son, of 
Ludlow. 

All members of the Purcell family 
are on the sick list. 



CONSTANCE 



Notice Of Bids 

Notice is hereby given that bids 
will be received by the Board of 
the Hopeful Lutheran Church for 
a Sexton for the Hopeful Lutheran 
Cemetery for the year 1944. 

Bids must be in the hands of H. 
J. Kelly, not later than February 
12, 1944. 

The Council reserves the right to 
reject any and all bids. 
HOPEFUL LUTHERAN COUNCIL. 



NOTICE ! 

DEALERS AND ROOMING HOUSE 

OWNERS 

20,000 PIECES OF 

CHINAWARE AND GLASSWARE 

AS LOW AS 2 for 5c 

Enamelware, pots and pans. 
Sold below factory cost. 

SAVINGS UP TO 50% 
PAT'S CHINA STORE 

736 MADISON . COVINGTON 



Quick Dry Enamel $1.98 Gal. 

Guaranteed House Paint $1.69 Gal. 

Red Roof Paint $1.49 Gal. 

Aluminum Paint $4.95 Gal. 

Black Roof Coating 49c Gal. 

In 5-Gallon Kits 
Kemtone $2.98 Gal. 



Henry Kottmyer, Sr. ,and Wil 
liam Zimmer were business callers 
in Burlington, Monday. 

Mrs. Mary Gross spent Wednes- 
day with Mrs. Lena Fritz. ^ 

Mrs. Charles Kottmyer, Mrs. 
Harold Burton, Mrs. James Clay- 
ton, Mrs. Charles Hodges and Mrs. 
Duncan Huey spent Monday in 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Esther Easter and daughter 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Emil Regenbogen and family. 

Mrs. Henry Kottmyer, Mrs; W. E. 
Zimmer, Mrs. Duncan Huey and 
daughter spent Wednesday after- 
noon with Mrs. Bolivar Shinkle, of 
Petersburg. 

Mrs. Charles Kottmyer and son 
called on Mrs. James Clayton, Sun- 
day. 

Mr., and Mrs. George Casper and 
son spent Sunday evening with 
Mrs. Duncan Huey and daughter. 

S.-Sgt. and Mrs. Harold Prabel, 
of Columbus, Ohio fc spent the past 
week with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Prabel. 

Mrs. George Kottmyer spent 
Monday in Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Margaret Prabel and son 
spent Sunday with relatives. 

Recent callers of Mrs. Henry 
Kottmyer and Mrs. Duncan Huey 
were Mrs. George Maegley, Tues- 
day afternoon and Mrs. Harry 
Prabel, Sunday afternoon. 

The Constance Homemakers will 
hold their monthly meeting at the 
home of Mrs. John Dolwick on 
Wednesday, February 2. 

Sympathy is extended to Mrs. 
George Parson and son in the 
death of George Parson. 

Miss Nell Hempfling has been on 
the sick list. 

Regular morning and evening 
services at Constance Christian 
Church will be Sunday, February 
6. Church services will be held 
Sunday morning, January 30. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Helton enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Hel- 
ton and children, Sunday. 



lurns and 
>eck spent 
Stanley 

ector and 
tests Sat- 



Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector and 
daughter spent the pas week with 
Mrs. Cord Cox and sc Willie, of 
Lawrenceburg Fery Rx; i. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cyarli< White and 
family are all surlerinifr with flu. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tommjfijlbdon and 
children moved to they Lawrence 
Chambers farm list wfek. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Arnold are 
suffering with colds. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eiibry Klopp call- 
ed on Mr. and M« Johr Klopp one 
evening last week . 

Mr. and Mrs. aohn 
family and Mrs. t. H. 
Sunday with Mr. ifid 
Smith and family^ 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. 
daughter were dinner 
urday of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp 
and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Leek. 

Mrs. John Aylor was called to 
town Sunday on a count of illness 
of some of her rel; ,ives. 

Mrs. Lydia Abdo . and Pete Ab- 
don are ill with the flu. 

Mrs. Paul Wolfarjspei t Sunday 
with Mr. arM Mr® Ev >ett Wolfe 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Anold were 
calling on relatives in JjPetersburg^ 
Sunday. pt 

Bud Burcham to >k a «foad of to- 
bacco to the Lex lgton market, 
Sunday. 

. W. O. Rector deU/ered some nice 
tobacco this past week to Covings 
ton for J. H. Hueypmd A. H. Cook 
and son and Courtney Jarrell, of 

Pptorchnrcr 



Petersburg. 

Everett Wolfe and 
shopping in Covington, 



son were 

aiturday. 

4 



Early History Of Bjone Co. 



GORDON SUPPLY CO. 



736 MADISON 



COVINGTON 



PETERSBURG 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Jarrell's 
guests for supper one evening last 
week were Mr. and Mrs. M. K. 
Toadvine and sons and Mr. and 
Mrs. Jimmy Jarrell and son. 

Mrs. C. R. Jarrell called on Mrs. 
Maude Howard on Wednesday aft- 
ernoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Gridley and 
Mrs. G. C. Stott attended a lecture 
in the city on Monday evening. 

Mrs. Mary G. Berkshire spent 
several days at. her home on the 
farm this week. ' 

Billy and Frank Hitzfield attend- 
ed a class party at Hebron on last 
Wednesday night. 

Miss Laura Mathews has been 
suffering from having a tooth ex- 
tracted last Saturday. 

Embry Klopp and family moved 
to the farm of W. O. Rector on 
Thursday. 

Mr. Rector and family are stay- 
ing with his sister, Mrs. Corda Cox 
until they can get possession of the 
property they purchased here, re- 
cently. « 



Visitors at this office Friday 
were Mrs. John E. Moore and Mrs. 
John Hopperton, of Burlington R 1; 
Mr. S. H. Ambrose, of Burlington 
R. 1; Marvin Kite, of Walton R. 2; 
C. O. Portwood, Burlington, R. 2; 
L. M. Spaulding of Florence; Ott 
Rogers of Petersburg and Lon 
1 1 Wilson, of Walton, R. 2. 



By A. M. fealty 

• * 

No doubt the ol( est pioneer who 
made Boone Courity his future 
home before emigrating was Chris- 
topher Zimmermaijj who was born 
in Orange County, 0a.., bout 1743. 
His wife's maiden name vas Maria 
Tanner of Culpepper C, unty, Va., 
a daughter of Frederii- Tanner 
and Elizabeth (Aylor) l^nner. Mr. 
Zimmerman was the father of 9 
children, 7 girls an 1 2 ijoys, all of 
these children beirlg bojn in Vir- 
ginia. j& 

Nancy, one fo the, girls, married 
.John Rouse one of the pioneers 
that helped with the settlement of 
the Hopeful neighborhood iri the 
year 1805. Mr. Ro \se built his 
log house on what #is in the past, 
known as the Henry Lev is Tanner 
farm and in 1810 h -d J s father- 
in-law, Mr. Zimmerff an come to 
Boone County, wher 1 X erected 
for himself and wi a, eg house 
not far from his d^#gh$ar's. 

Mr. Zimmerman Vasr» Revolu- 
tionary soldier and was jyesent at 
the surrender of Corntoallis at 
Yorktown, Va. He r sver forgot his 
military bearing ar I always wore 
his knee breeches, \ cccked hat 
and gold buckles oiuhis shoes. He 
liked to ride horse^ck nd spent 
much of his time » "idii up and 
down the narrow . -cre\ j roads, 
through the woods, aas jJpugh he 
owned the vast arest, of »nd over 
which he traveled. **' 

Mr. Zimmerman 1 ad fljne of the 
foremost sugar cai ps 'in Boone 
County in 1811. He japped a great 
number of trees and*the water was 
transferred from thj§ tree to pails 
by means of elder ^roughs. When 
these pails became full it was gath- 
ered by a team of oxen hitched to 
a sled loaded with barrels, then 
transferred to large kettles where it 
wis made into maple syrup or 
sugar. . 

In looking over Mr. Tanner's 
shopbook, we fincrt that he did 
much work for Mr! Zimmerman, 
such as making iron spool s with 
long handles to stir the prup — a 
great number of candle jicks, a 
set of harness for oxen, : ft nails, 
4 pair door hings, 4 pair of win- 
dow hinges and «manr other 
articles. -,, 

Mr. Zimmerman died iniK32 and 
was buried in the private J^metery 
on the Perry Utz farm. It is hard 
to distinguish his grave as field 
stones were used as markers and 
there is a great number of them. 

His boys were Josl ua, born Aug. 
22, 1771 and Frederick, born Nov. 
30, 1775. His first wife was Susan 
Tanner. After her death he mar- 
ried Lucy Snyder. He owned a great 
number of acres of land w \ere the 
old Dr. Scott resider ce is located. 
His youngest son, F^ederkj: mar- 
ried Rosanna Crigler. Tfie boys 
moved to Boone ^County? before 
their father moved here to make 
his home. 



mi i ii i mill i n ■ ii ii ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in 111 1 1 in i in 1 1 

New James 

Theatre 

Beginning Sept. 25th One Show 

Each and Every Night at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

War Time 

BARGAIN NIGHT S MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



A 4-H club window display in 
Leslie county contained 116 dif- 
ferent items that had been produc- 
ed in gardens or on home farms of 
members. 



In Lee county, M xcus Calmos 
marketed 3,146 pour^ of tobacco 
groWn on 1.9 acres, i^ 



**= 





(JW EASIER. WAV 
^TO SOVJB 

Business 

TROU5L-E5 

%JS 
TO 

Advertise . 



1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

Another big Double Feature attrac- 
tion at no increase in price. Don't 
miss them! 
Simone Simon, Michael Whalen, 
Wally Vernon, Dennis O'Keefe, in 

"TAHATI HONEY" 

Plus a wild and wooly western 

drama 

Tex O'Brien, James Newill and the 

Texas Rangers, in 

"WEST OF TEXAS" 

FBI. & SAT., JANUARY 28 AND 29 



See the most amazing picture of 

the new year — 

with 

Robert Donat, Valerie Hobson and 

Walter Rilla 

THE ADVENTURES OF 
TARTU 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 30TH 



Charles Starrett, in 

"FRONTIER FURY 

MONDAY, JANUARY 31ST 



»f 



It's a brand new discovery in film 
history— see how terrific they are 
together 

Monty Woolley, Gracie Fields, and 
Alan Mowbray, in 

HOLY MATRIMONY 

TUES. & WED., FEBRUARY 1 & 2 
1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I ■ 1 1 ] 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 f f 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 } 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 1 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimmmiiiiim 

Want a 
New Career? 

You can very likely find just 
the chance you're looking for 
—in the WAC. 

If you haven't a skill, Army 
experts will teach you. Perhaps 
you'd like to drive a jeep, work 
a teletype machine, or help di- 
rect airplane traffic. -"■ 

Whatever you do, you will 
get valuable training — learn 
interesting things — and help 
get this war won: 

TODAY— get full details at 
the nearest U. S. Army Recruit- 
ing Station (your local post 
office will give you the address). 
Or write: The Adjustant Gen- 
eral, Room 4415, Munitions 
Building, Washington, D. C. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimuifiiiuiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



WANTED 



. 



Stenographer in Law Office, Erlanger, Ky. Per- 
manent position. Excellent opportunity for 
right person. Call Dixie 7047 or 7110. 

HARRY L. RIGGS 



WHEN IN TOWN BUY AT J. A. BAUMGARTNER 
LOWEST PRICES ON 

RUGS, MATTRESSES and FURNITURE 

COME IN AND SEE 



50-Lb. 

All Cotton 

MATTRESS 

$7.95 

50-Lb. 

All Felt 

MATTRESS 

$10.98 



9x12 Felt Base Rugs $3.50 

12x12 Armstrong Rugs . . $8.95 

9x12 32 Oz. Waffle 

Rug Pad .$5.95 

HEAVY WEIGHT 

GOLD SEAL yd. 49c 



MAPLE BABY CRD3 $13.98 



Felt. 

Day Bed 

MATTRESS 

$8.95 

Baby Crib 
MATTRESS 

$3.98 



Bedroom, Living room, studio couches, chairs, 
rockers, occasional pieces and many odd pieces. 

Don't Forget The Address 
1046 MADISON AT 11TH, COVINGTON, KY. 



WOMEN'S SHOE SALE 

OPA SPECIAL RELEASE 

STAMP NEEDED 



Flattering . styles ! Your oppor- 
tunity to buy leather-soled shoes, 
ordinarily rationed ... at both a 
great saving in price and without 
a coupon. All sizes, but not in 



You get more for* your money when you buy 
"Star Brand," "Poll Parrot," and "Endicott John- 
son" shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 
prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. 



BUY WAR BONDS ^ITH YOUfi SAVINGS! 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



Uk 



I 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Town And Farm In Wartime 



Ration Reminder 

Gasoline — In 17 east coast states 
A-8 coupons are good through 
February 8. In states outside the 
east coast area A-19 coupons are 



,*V 







Your Valentine Photo 



Keep your image close to him 
in' the lonely hours on a far 
away front — send your smil- 
ing Valentine Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. 

Service Photo Studio 

804 MADISON, COVINGTON 



Studio Hours: 
& p. m. daily. 
5 p. 



11 a. m. to 
Sundays 1 to 
m. 



good through March 21. 

Tire Inspection — Deadline for A 
Coupon holders is March 31. For 
B and C holders, deadline is. Feb- 
ruary 28. -^ 

Sugar— Stamp No. 30 in book 
four is good for 5 pounds through 
March fll. 

Shoes — Stamp No. 18 in book one 
is good for 1 pair. Stamp No. 1 on 
the Airplane Sheet in book three is 
good for 1 pair. 

Fuel Oil — Pe?idd 2 coupons are 
good through ^ February 7 in all 
areas except the South. Period 3 
coupons, now valid in the Middle 
West, East, Far West, and South 
remain good through March 13 in 
the Middle West, East and Far 
West, and through February 21 in 
the South. Period 4 and 5 coup- 
ons, now valid in the South, re- 
main good through September 30. 

Meats, Fat&r-Brown stamps R, S, 
T, and U are good through Janu- 
ary 29. Brown stamp V is good 
through February 26. Brown 
stamp W becomes good January 
30 and remains good through Feb- 
ruary 26. 

Processed Foods — Green stamps 
G, H, and J in. book four are good 
through February 20. . 

More Coffee, Cocoa in 1944 

Civilians will get more coffee, 
chocolate, and "cocoa in 1944 than 
in 1943, according to the War Food 
Administration. Four pounds more 
of coffee and one-half pound more 
of cocoa beans have been allocat- 
ed for each civilian. 
Extend Sale of Ration-Free Shoes 

Sales of certain icniefly novelty) 
types of women's shoes, ration-free 
at three dollars or less a pair, 
have been extended an extra week 
—through February 5, OPA has an- 
nounced. 










S 



JiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii^ 

NO PRIORITIES 

Are Needed For Farm Tools 
To Be Welded 

| R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY j 

| 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 § 
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiT 



To Fight Gas Black Market 

A plan whereby gasoline ration 
coupons are mailed to individual 
motorists from 'carefully guarded 
central issuing stations is now be- 
ing established by OPA. The plan 
is expected to eliminate thefts of 
ration coupons, give OPA a check 
of issuance, and eliminate a great 
load from local 'boards. To furth- 
er fight black markets, about Feb- 
ruary 1 OPA will issue a notice 
urging endorsement of coupons to 
be inserted in newly issued gaso- 
line ration books. 

Pork From Farm Slaughterers 

Twelve red stamps in book four, 
which are numbered "8" and let- 
tered from "A" through "M" may 
be used for buying pork and other 
rationed meats from farm slaugh- 
terers. These stamps will not be 
used by consumers in general until 
February 27. They will have same 
expiration dates for purchases 
from farmers as in city markets 
The stamps are worth 10 points 
each, making a total value of -120 
points. This does not give the in 
dividual who buys frefh a farm 
slaughterer a larger meat ration 
than anyone else. It merely al- 
lows him to buy a fairly large 
amount at one time. In addition, 
brown stamps in book three may 
be used ahead of their regular 
validity dates when used in buying 
from farmers. 
See Where War Bond Money Goes 

Employees of the Department of 
Agriculture were the first govern- 
ment group to inspect the U. S. S. 
American Mariner, new Liberty 
training ship for the U. S. Mer- 
chant Marine, and see how their 
war bond money was being spent. 
This ship is the -largest ever to sail 
up the Potomac river to Washing- 
ton. Claude R. Wickard, Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, told the em- 
ployees^ he expected them to 
achieve their fourth war loan goal 
of $4,779,602 and pointed out that 
they had over subscribed their 
third war loan quota by almost 25 
per cent. 

Steel Springs For Furniture 

In about 60 days, steel springs 
for upholstered wood furniture will 
be on the market, according to the 
War Production Board. Manufac- 
turers may use a limited quantity 
of steel springs under a new WPB 
ruling. 
Returned War Dogs "Reprocessed" 

When the war dog comes home, 






KENTUCKY 



* 



■ 




* 

- 


* 


• 
• 

• 

* * ' 














he will return in his pre-war state 
of docility with an honorable dis- 
charge certificate and service 
record, the War Department has 
announced. Dogs are "reprocessed" 
to assure their welcome return to 
the community, and are taught to 
be friendly with all rather than 
the few to whom they were offici- 
ally detailed for war duties. Dogs 
are given a thorough physical ex- 
amination before being sent home 
and are returned at government 
expense. 

Price Down On Some Peas 
Retail prices of whole dry peas 
should be about one and one-half 
cents a pound less, and of split dry 
peas about two cents a pound less, 
under a- recent OPA regulation, 
effective January 26. * 

Ease Restrictions On Plumbing 
Consumers who wish to buy 
plumbing, cooking, and heating 
equipment in most cases no longer 
need" authorization from WPB! 
Some of the items which need no 
priority rating are — bathtubs, lav- 
atories, toilets, laundry trays, sinks 
showers, shower stalls, condensa- 
tion pumps, chemical toilets, drink- 
ing fountains, septic tanks, grease 
interceptors, flush tanks, scullery 
sinks, and wash fountains. Unra- 
tioned cooking and heating stoves 
also may be purchased without 
WPB authorization. 



BURLINGTON R. 2 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Tommy Stephens. 

Wm. Stephens and mother and 
Mr. and Mrs. Laverne Stephens 
were in Covington one day recent- 
ly. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Scott and son 
were in Florence, Thursday. 

Glad to report Mrs. Jake Cook 
much* improved after a recent ill- 
ness. 

Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lee Roy McNeely. f 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Presser and 
daughter spent Sunday with Mrs. 
Rena Presser. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Conner 
and sons were supper guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Kirb Conner, Saturday 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cook spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Cook. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Brady spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Stephens and sons. 

Miss Mary Lou Williamson at- 
tended the basketball game Friday 
night at Burlington. 

Mrs. Cam White was called to 
nurse her sister, Mrs. Lou Wil- 
liamson, who is confined to her 
bed. 

Callers of Mrs. Lou Williamson 
Sunday afternoon were Mrs. Kirb 
Conner, Mrs. Bert Scott, Mrs. Rena 
Presser, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Press- 
er, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Deck, Mrs. 
Allen Rogers, and Bro. and Mrs. 
Sam Hamilton. 

Mrs. Percy Ryle and Cam White 
spent Sunday with Mrs. Jake Cook. 

West Kittle was in Belleview one 
day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Mallicoat 
spent Saturday night with Mr. and 
Mrs. Kermit Mallicoat. 

Wm. Ryle Presser has been mov- 
ed to a Camp in Oregon. 



HEBRON 



* 



Today, we all owe a tremendous debt of 
gratitude to men and women in the uni- 
forms of Uncle Sam's fighting forces. 
They're on duty today at the four corners 
of the earth and on all the seven seas — 
protecting our lives and our way of life. 

And we musn't overlook the splendid 
job that other men in the uniform of our 
police forces are doing. Their "zone of 
operation" may be Kentucky rather 
than Kiska, it may be the highway to 
the next town rather than the airways 
across the Atlantic, but their job ia 
fundamentally the same — protecting 
us and ours. 

We Kentuckians can indeed be proud 
of our police organizations— city, county 
or state. Most of us have few occasions 
to call upon the service of our police 
forces — but that in itself is a tribute to 
their efficiency. They're on the job day 
and night whether we need them or not 

PUT' ANOTHER BOND IN THE BATTLE — BUY IT NOW! 

OSBORN'S DEPARTMENT STORE 
Phone Florence 133 Florence, Ky. 

GREYHOUND 

LINES 



Some of us in the Greyhound organiza- 
tion, because of the nature of our work, 
have more frequent occasion to co- 
operate with the police than do many of 
our fellow citizens of Kentucky. For 
instance, we are in a position to see 
clearly how much the police of this com- 
munity, as well as those of neighboring 
communities, have contributed to the 
safety and convenience of bus transpor- 
tation. The aid these men have given in 
arranging the most practical and satis- 
factory routes through towns and cities 
is typical of their skillful handling of all 
traffic problems. 

Greyhound's most important job, as we 
see it, is to make near and good neigh- 
bors of all the communities that our 
buses serve in Kentucky — and we feel 
that the able cooperation of police forces 
throughout the State has made it pos- 
sible for us to do this job with greater 
efficiency. 



Harry Hicks, of Covington spent 
the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. 
S. M. Graves. 

Mrs. Delbert Buckler left last 
week to visit her husband, Pvt. 
Delbert Buckler at Lawton, Okla. 

Ed Baker is convalescing from 
the flu. 

Mrs. Frank Aylor called on Mrs. 
Sterling Dickey, Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. Robert Cave and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Goodridge left Wednesday to 
visit Pvt. Robert Cave at Macon, 
Ga. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Baker, of 
Scotts road were the Sunday aft- 
ernoon guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Baker. 

Cpl. Edwin Walton departed 
Saturday for Camp Lee, Va., after 
a furlough with his parents, and 
other relatives. 



RECORDER 1 YEAR $1.50 







WtHZMH 



RXHSHSHINSHK 



GAT^TV 
th£at&e 1 



ERLANGER, ELSMERE, KY 

FREE PA '.KING LOT 

SHC V TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. J: 00 and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shows 6»0, 7:45, 9:30 p. m. 

Sunday 3 Shafts 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 

Sunday Matinee i ";30 p. m. 



TONIGHT and FRIDAY 

JANUARY 27TH • ND 28TH 




5fOfT*OJ| - 

LUISf ARtyRO 

Raitier • de C tfdova 

WILLIAM • Ml 

Bendix t LMas 

*» Mm 

Oscar Homo 

* turn mui . tew *■» * um* m 

* fcfc • ft* M M i 1Mb ■*■ 




SATURDAY 

JANUARY 29TH 



Lgn^mi 



sAuni FUN! 

SAUTE TO 
HUSK! 




RHODES 

MACDONAID 

CAREY 




Marty May Cliff Edwards 

Lorraine aid Rognan 

and 

DONA DRAKE 

** ** *** * atph Mvr »"r 

A MMopMM Pieturo) 



Also "Batman" * ». 10 




SUNDAY and M >NDAY 

JANUARY 30VAN1 31ST 




RABBIT HASH 



THE PICTURE THAT 
GIVES YC 




SUSAN HERBERT MART 

PETERS - M RSHALL* ASTOR 

wM, ELLIOTT REI '• RICHARD CAR 




News ^and 



DONT DELAY THE 
EXAMINATION 

If your eyes feel strained, 
uncomfortable, or tire easily 
when reading, come to us at 
once for a careful check-up. 

For years many Northern 
Kentuckians have found eye 
comfort and good vision by 
entrusting their optical 
trouble to us. 




HXHXHZKXHXHZHXHXHXHXHXI 



TUES., anjlWEDr &SDAY 
TBlprRSDA^ 

FEBRUARY 1ST 2ND,' AND 3RD 

THE FIRST BIG HIM Ml 
r STORY OP THE W, ft! 

* • ' i 



* 




Also Cartoon and Comedy 



For your convenience this 
Theater sells WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 
box office. . • 



Herman Ryle took his hogs to 
Petersburg to have them butcher- 
ed last week. 

Mrs. Mellie Wingate is staying 
with her brother, J. E. Hodges, 
who is still very ill. 

Johnnie Woods and wife are 
sporting a new car. 

Orville Kelly is having a large 
pond built on his farm. 

Mrs. Dora Delph's friends gath- 
ered at her home Sunday and gave 
her a pleasant surprise. 

Robert H. Wilson and wife were 
in Newport, Saturday visiting her 
mother, who is very ill. 

Mrs. Pauline Louden spent last 
week with her mother, Mrs. Nettie 
Cayton, of Rising Sun, Ind. * 

Thaddie Ryle and wife were in 
Covington one day last week. 

Harry Acra was out to see his 
friend Ezra Aylor and family one 
day last week. Mr. Aylor is very 
ill. 

Paul Acra and family, of Aurora, 
were visiting Mr. and Mrs. Gene 
Wingate and wife, Sunday. 

Most farmers in this vicinity are 
through stripping tobacco and 
most of them have marketed their 
crops. 

Robert H. Wilson has bought the 
Sid Gaines property and will move 
there early in the Spring. 

Minnie Stephens was in Coving- 
ton last Wednesday and Thursday. 

Joe L. Stephens and wife passed 
through our burg, Sunday even- 
ing. 



CELEBRATES 66TH BIRTHDAY 

Mrs. Dora Delph was surprised 
Sunday, January 23 with a birth- 
day dinner at her home in honor 
of her 66th birthday. 

Those present to celebrate the 
happy occasion were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer 1 Jarrell, Mr. and Mrs. Leom- 
er Louden, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Sutton, Mr. and Mrs. Frank York, 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Delph and daughter, Mrs. Mattie 
Hodges, Miss Minnie Stephens, Mi". 
and Mrs. John Louden, Mr. Vernon 
Gsey, and Howard Hodges. 
• A delicious dinner was spread at 
the noon hour. Everyone enjoyed 
the day and left wishing her many 
more happy birthdays. 



OVERSEAS 4-H'ER 

SENDS BACK AWARD 

G. L. Ponder, past president of 
the Oneida 4-H Club in Clay coun- 
ty, now overseas in the Armed 
Forces, sent $5 as an award, to the 
member of his club who had the 
best project and record fqfr the 
year. It was won by Anna Lee 
Sams. 



WATERLOO 



Clint Rowe and family and Mr. 
and Mrs. John Griffin moved to 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., Saturday. , 

Little Byron David Purdy and 
W. G. Kite are on the sick list. . 

Bro. and Mrs. Sam Hamilton and 
daughter were Saturday night 
guests of the Kites and Purdys. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Moore were 
shopping in Covington, Thursday. 

Mrs. Lou Williamson is suffer- 
ing from a fall she received last 
Tuesday. 

Miss Lucille Nead and Tommy 
Stevens were united in marriage 
last Wednesday evening. Their 
many friends wish them a long 
happy married life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Purdy, Bert 
Newhall and W. G. Kite were shop- 
ping in Covington. Friday. 

Mrs. Rosa Stevens entertained 
with a shower Saturday night for 
the newlyweds. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Mallicoat 
and son visited, Mr. and Mrs. Ker- 
mit Mallicoat, the past few days. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 

tort* 

■ Specializing in the 
correction and 
protection of 
EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

iHours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 

Features Shoppers' 
Lunch 

A] special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 25c 
should be of special interest 
to Boone County shoppers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE 



WE ARE NOW TAKING ORDERS FOR 

BABY CHICKS 

We Sell DR. SALISBURY'S Poultry Remedies, 
- Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

512 Pike St. " ^mrmVtJIkmmf HEmlock 9168 

Covington WwJHbSIwH Open Sundays Till Noon 



• PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 

FIELD and GARDEN 



DIXIE BRAND 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest 
farm year in history with tried and 
proven Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds — 
high in germination and purity- 
best all-around results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



CEORCE W. 



Since 1863 



AND 

COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 

24-26 W. 25^29 PIKE 

SEVENTH ST. STREET 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 
I SINCE 1863 









- ■■ r ' 

THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



U 






• ' 



I 






THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1944 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY 24, 1924 









Lick Creek 

Cecil Williamson is doing a lot 
of blacksmithing and making sleds 
on account of the slick weather. 

Helen. Clore is confined to her 
home with heart trouble. 
Hopeful 

Lottie Mae and Rosa Belle Rouse 
have returned to their homes on 
the Union pike, after spending 
several Weeks with their cousin, 
Viola Horton. 

Tommie Easton and wife spent 
last Sunday with her mother, Mrs. 
Annie Beemon. 

Beaver Lick 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Cleek and 
Miss Anna write that they are en- 
joying their trip to Jacksonville. 
Fla. 

Robert Rouse, of Burlington, was 
in this neighborhood renewing fire 
insurance policies, last week. 
Big Bone 

Charles Jones has gone to Lud- 
low to be under the care of Dr. J. 
G. Slater for a few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Miller are 
spending a few days visiting rela- 
tives in Louisville. 

Gunpowder 

Stanley Utz and wife of the Big 
Bone neighborhood, passed thru 
our town on Friday of last week. 

Mrs. J. W. Rouse is still very ill 
and her condition is such that her 
recovery is very doubtful. ** 

Rabbit Hash 

Mrs. Ada Ryle and daughter 
Wahetta visited her parents, Harry 
Acra and wife, last Thursday. 

Lewis Craig and family enter- 
tained W. J. Stephens, Saturday 
night and ■ Sunday. 

Florence 

Clifton Roberts, of. Cincinnati, 
spent Saturday ;:nc. Curd?.'* with 
with his sister, Mrs. Mer.t a " Mar- 
tin and mother, Mrs. C. C. Rob- 
erts. | ■ J 

Dr. and Mrs. T. B. Castleman, 
who are in the south, write back 
that they are enjoying every min- 
ute and having a fine time. 
Hebron 

Mr. and Mrs. Webb McQlasson 
have had as their guest the past 
week, her sister, Miss Mabel Dol- 
wick, of Pt. Pleasant. 

Mrs. Jennie Conner left last 
week to spend the remainder of the 
winter with her daughter in Cin- 
cinnati. 



Francesville 

Misses Gladys and Jessie Wilson 
were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
L. Brown, Sunday. 

Miss Edna Brown, of near Idle- 
wild spent several days the past 
week with Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Aylor 
and family. 

Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. Stanley Conrad, of Coving- 
ton, was the guest Monday of Mrs. 
Charles Craven. 

Mrs. Charles Bradford and Miss 
Bessie Talbot have returned from 
Covington^ after visiting relatives 
the past week. 

East Bend 

Mrs. Alma Ogden and Mrs. Katie 
Hankinson spent last Thursday 
with Mrs. Cora Ogden. 

Mrs. Robert Hodges and son 
Orville, went to Walton last Sat- 
urday on business. 

Burlington 

Miss Myrtle Beemon, of Gun- 
powder has been the guest of her 
sister, Mrs. L. C. Weaver for sever- 
al days. 

Zelma Clore and daughter, Hazel 
Marie and Martha Kelly, were the 
pleasant guests of J. W. Kelly and 
wife, Sunday afternoon. 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



' 




BETTER APPEARANCE 



Need of Glasses need not detract 
from youthfully "modern" appear- 
ance. Come In today and see us. 






DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OFFICES WITH 

T C H 

. Opticians — Jewelers 

613-10 Madison Ave., Covington 
SINCE 1SS7 



Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Earl Whit- 
aker and Mr. and Mrs. John Whit- 
aker visited Mr. and Mrs. John 
Green and Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
Green in Covington, Saturday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grant were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Clint Rid- 
dell, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Homey, 
Fri-'a" evenir?. 

Gecrge Parson passed away at 
hi; horm Saturday. We extend 
sympathy to his relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Campbell and 
son spent Thursday evening with 
Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Helton and 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Jones and 
Mr. and Mrs/ Franklin Ryle and 
daughter Jean spent Saturday 
evening with Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Reitman and family. 

Mrs: Evelyn Wilson entertained 
the Junior choir of the Sand Run 
Baptist Church, Sunday. 

Alfred Wilson spent the week- 
end with Lawrence Barnes, of Idle- 
wild. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Jones spent 
Sunday with relatives in Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. William 
Blaker and family. 



HO-HUMMM! 

What This Place 

Needs, Folks, Is 

A Few Good 

.. Ads In This 

NEWSPAPER 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 rn 1 1 ■ i 

AT THE 

Gayety Theatre* 

i • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ti 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 u 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

TONIGHT AND FRIDAY 

William Bendix, who plays the 
roughest, toughest role of his car- 
eer as Janoshik, the wash room at- 
tendant and secret leader of the 
"underground army," in Para- 
mount's "Hostages," coming to 
the Gayety was given a dressing 
room and fluffy ruffled curtains at 
the door and windows and rose- 
petal designs on the wallpaper. 
Due to a shortage of, dressing 
rooms, Bill got the one originally 
used by Bonita Granville when she 

was only in her teens. . 
» • • 

SATURDAY, 

It's getting to be more of a head- 
ache every day to be a Hollywood 
producer or director. 

Take for instance the dilemma 
of Director Ralph Murphy whose 
latest picture for Paramount "Sal- 
ute For Three" called' for a good 
many scenes in a canteen for ser- 
vicemen. Naturally, the canteen 
had to be supplied with soldiers 
and sailors. Unfortunately for 
Murphy, however , the draft call 
kept depleting his supply of 
extras. In a *ace against the call 
to arms, Murphy shot the canteen 
number first, so youll see an ade- 
quate number of serviceVnen in the 
film. 

"Salute For Three" co-stars Bet- 
ty Rhodes and Macdonald Carey. 

It's a musical romance with five 



hit tunes, Cliff Edwards and Dona 

Drake. j 

• ♦ • * 

TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY 

Noted for the outstanding rost- 
er of top literary properties it 
posses, 20th Century-Fox brings 
another best-selling book to the 
screen with its picturization of 
Richard Tregaskis' "Guadalcanal 
Diary." 

Preston Foster, Lloyd Nolan, 
William Bendix, Richard Conte and 
Anthony Quinn head the imposing 
cast of "Guadalcanal Diary" which 
also includes Richard Jaeckel, Roy 
Roberts, Minor Watson, Ralph 
Byrd, Lionel Stander, Reed Had- 
ley and John Archer. 



BIG FAMILY ENJOYS 

STORED FOOD SUPPLY 

Mrs. S. I. Byrne is one of the 
homemakers in Daviess county who 
is enjoying the results of last sum- 
mer's canning. Stored for winter 
use were 1,033 quarts for her fam- 
ily of nine. Of this amount, 356 
quarts were fruit, 288 quarts toma- 
toes, and 389 quarts vegetables. The 
family also had 26 bushels of po- 
tatoes, three bushels of sweet po- 
tatoes, the same amount of onions 
and 50 gallons of molasses. In 'ad- 
dition to doing her own canning, 
Home Agent Venice Lovelady said 
that Mrs. Byrne helped her neigh- 
bors can with her pressure cooker 
and then caned 279 quarts for 
city relatives. 



Try A Wa/t Ad— They Sell 



1 fttON 



Wendell Smith and Ben Al Riley 
were dinner guests Sunday of their 
friend Roy Bi ;ler, Jr. In the aft- 
ernoon they v tit to a show in Cin- 
cinnati, i 

Frank Feldh^us, Jr., has return- 
ed to his hon \ in Washington, D. 
C, following j. week's visit with 
his relative, M«. Harold Gatewood. 

Miss Mary \ edges' is home from 
a visit with fr mds in Burlington. 

Deepest syrq^athy is felt by their 
friends in thfjFcommunity for Mr. 
and Mrs. JoWft B. Oliver in the 
death of the! son, John Wade 
Oliver, ThurscUy at the Children's 
Hospital, Cincfinati. 
L W. M. Rach?, of Cincinnati was 
out Friday fo' the day with his 
mother, Mrs. \ tud N. Rachal. Mrs. 
W. M. Rachal '•$ in Detroit, Mich., 
with her sister Mrs. Walter Apple, 
who is ill with lu.. ;'< 

Mrs. Will ^ ^tew od, who has 
been ill with ;:. pneu lonia is now 
nicely convalei tent] at her home 
on Rice Pike. , * hj 

Mr. and Mrs? ?enny Setters, Miss 
Bonnie K. Set, fers and Mrs. Elva 
Moore Normaa ispera Sunday in 
Cincinnati witrvtheli kindred, Mr. 
and Mrs. CharJ jy Melyin. 

New Haven's-^ba^ketball teams 
took Warsaw tagcarr^ Friday night 
in a double hagjf r, played on the 
home floor. The largest crowd in 
years witnessed these splendidly 
played games. 

Mrs. Joseph A Huey was in Crit- 
tenden, Friday afternoon to see 
Mr. and Mrs. .'. M. Collins. Mr. 



Collins has been ill and confined 
to his room for several months. 

A. M. Stephens, our efficient 
Star Route mail* carrier, suffered 
minor injuries Tuesday morning 
when his car skidded on the ice 
and overturned on the Joe Scott 
hill. Damages to the car were 
slight. 




PRINT 1000 ENVELOPES 
Like Last Time. 
Got A Sample? 
FINE! 




Phone Us for Your 
PRINTING 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 



GIVE HER ... 

a permanent entitling her to 
lovely natural looking curls! 
Priced to fit any pocketbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious cold wave. 

Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
Open Evenings 




All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

CARDOSI 

Rear 24 East Fifth St. 
COVINGTON 

Phone Hemlock 8689 
Residence Phone Florence 386 




-N€GL€CT YOUR PROPERTY 
MARS REPAIRS -flout! 

See Us About a New Roof 

or Needed Roof Repairs 

'en can't afford to let your horn* depreciate far n eed of e 
dependable, weather-tight roof. We ere roofing specialists, 
MSMpiei to givo you p r omp t service — to use the biggest-value 
roofings money can buy— CAREY Asphalt Shingles. Your 
choioe of beautiful, non-fading colors. We handle all details. 
No rod tape. Call, or come in and see us today. 



•Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

- 218 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 







Pin-up picture for the rnfcn who "can't afford 

■ ■ 



to buy an extra war bond . . . 



!; 






I ■ 



YOU'VE HEARD PEOPLE say: "I 
can't afford to buy an extra War 
Bond." Perhaps you've said it your- 
self . . . without realizing what a ridic- 
ulous thing it is to say to men who 



you will probably £ id that you can 
buy an extra $200, . . or $300 ... or 
even $500 worth of War Bonds. 






", 









T 



are dying. , 

The very least that you can do is to 
buy an extra $100 War Bond . . . above 
and beyond the Bonds you are now 
buying or had planned to buy. In fact, 
if you take stock of your resources, 



Sounds like more than you "can 
afford"? Well, young soldiers can't 
afford to die, either £ . yet they do it 
when called upon. So is it too much 
to ask of us that w$ invest more of 
our money in War B jnds . . . the best 

investment in the world today? Is 

tit ■ 
that too much to asljt?. 

I 




1^ 





MM BACK THE ATTACK! 

This Advertisement Sponsored by 



THIS 




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■ •.. . 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1941 



-- 






THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 





















Conservation News 

By J. Casper Acree 



1 




Two pastured areas separated by 
fence. The area on the left has 
been over-grazed. The field on the 
right has been under better man- 
agement. 

Grass farming is the surest way 
for improving depleted soils, as 
well as retaining what we have 
left. Old pastures will do a great 
deal of extra grazing if we do a 
little work on them. Probably the 
first step would be brushing and 
rocking; that is, cut or deaden un- 
desirable brush and trees and trim 
some of the lower limbs off the 
best trees, using some of this ma- 
terial for mulching galded areas. 
Loose rock should be piled so that 
they can be removed for crushing 
later on. 

Rev. Wm. Smith said that he 
deadened or hacked around sever- 
al trees about this time last year 
and that all of them died. 

Nearly all of the land in Boone 
County needs lime and phosphate. 
If this material is available at least 
two tons of lime and 300 pounds of 
20 percent phosphate should be ap- 
plied per acre. Now, also is a good 
time to thicken grass stands and 
to seed bare spots. A mixture pf 
grasses should be used. On sweet 
land a mixture of sweet clover 5 
lbs., redtop 2 lbs., ryegrass 5 lbs., 
and bluegrass or orchard grass 5 
lbs., should be used, and on sour 
land lespedeza 5 lbs., redtop 2 lbs., 
ryegrass 5 lbs. should be used. The 
rate of seeding of this mixture per 
acre of course depends on the 
stand of grass already established. 
After we have a good pasture and 
want to keep it we must practice 
pasture rotation. Note the picture 
above. The left side of the fence 
has practically been grazed into the 
ground, while on the right side 
there is a heavy cover. N 

Fields should be arranged so 
stock can be moved from field to 
field every three or four weeks. 
This not only is beneficial to the 
pasture and stock as far as grazing 



value, but it will help control par- 
asites. Last, but not least, where 
at all possible fields should be clip- 
ped so as to encourage even growth 
and to get rid of undesirable 
growth: Then too, these clippings 
retu/n to humus faster where they 
have fallen down on the ground. 
Spring Must Be Here 
Bulldozers came out of their 
winter hiding like a swarm of bees 
last week. Spring must be here! 
One outfit is building ponds on 
Omer Cleek's farm this week, and 
is scheduled to go to the Bob Green 
and J. B. Heizer farms next week. 
Mr. Heizer had the soil conservation 
District to locate two reservoir sites 
for him. After completing one of 
the dams he plans on pushing a 
pipe line through the dam so _that 
water can flow to a concrete trough 
below. By using an 
cutoff he will have clean water 
available for the stock at all times. 
Also by extending the pipe he can 
furnish water to another field 
eliminating digging another reser- 
voir. He is thinking of building a 
second reservoir east of the barn, 
using the dam for a roadway, elim- 
inating considerable erosion down 
a steep slope, used for a lane. 
These reservoirs will be stocked 
with fish furnished thru the dis- 
trict. "■ ** 
A second bulldozer built a nice 
reservoir on the Helen Tomlin 
farm at Verona this week. Mr. 
King, operator of the farm, is cer- 
tainly proud of the fact that he 
will have plenty of water next 
year. Likewise a pipe was placed 
through the reservoir dam and a 
fence will be builff to keep stock 
out of the reservoir. This reser- 
voir was staked out by the district 
and will be stocked with fish. 

A third reservoir being con- 
structed this week is on the Orville 
Kelly farm. Orvills says he has 
worn out several pencils putting 
down the number of gallons of 
water he has hauled the last few 
years. When this reservoir is com- 
pleted Jiis water problem should be 
over for it will have .a depth of 
eighteen feet. This reservoir is be- 
ing constructed under district sup- 
ervision and will be used as a dem- 
onstration fish pond. Thru the 
bottom of the dam an eight-inch 
string of tile was laid, and a drain 
trap will be built at the upper end 
of the string so that it will be im- 
possible to drain the reservoir at 
any time. An inch pipe will be run 
through the tile to furnish stock 
water to a trough below. This res- 
ervoir will be stocked with fish, 



fertilized and an account will be 
kept of the catch. 

Little by little Boone County is 
becoming a county of many reser- 
voirs. Information on how to 
construct farm reservoirs can be 
be secured at the county agent's 
office or the Boone County 
conservation district office. 



McVILLE 



HAMILTON 



Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hamilton 
were guests of their daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Eldon Ryle, in Burling- 
ton, Saturday. 

Mrs. Bertha Huff called on Mrs. 
Lillie Huff, Saturday. 

Mrs. Bertha Allphin spent sever- 
al days with Mrs. Mabel Readnour 
the past week. Mrs. Readnour 
and baby returned home from St. 
automatic j Elizabeth Hospital, Monday. 

Hugh, Vest, Jr., and brother Lt. 
Douglas' Vest were guests of their 
aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Ryle one 
day last week. Lieut. Vest is en- 
joying a month's vacation, after a 
year in the Pacific. Upon his re- 
turn to duty he will attend Anna- 
polis for additional training. 

Rev. Sam Hogan accepted a call 
as pastor to Big Bone Baptist 
Church. He will move to the par- 
sonage in the near future. 

Mr. and Mrs. R., N. Moore were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff, 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Orin Edwards, and 
Mrs. Dora Jones attended the 
funeral of Mr. Sorrell of Elsmere, 
last Monday. 



STEPHENSON MILL 
ROAD 



Congratulations to Mrs. and Mrs. 
Tommie Stevens who were married 
last week. Several from here at- 
tended a shower in their honor 
given by the groom's mother, Mrs. 
sou fRosa Stevens, Saturday evening. 

Miss Rachel Pottinger was din- 
ner guest Sunday evening of Mrs. 
Clarence Wolfe. . 

Sunday afternoon callers in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Presser and family were Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Cook and Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Brady of Dam 39. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alton Buckler were 
visiting relatives in Cincinnati, O., 
Friday. 

Mrs. Clarence Wolfe and Mrs. 
Mary Tandy spent Saturday in 
Ghent and* Carrollton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leeomer Louden of 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., were here over 
the week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Presser 
and family were shopping in Cov- 
ington, Saturday. 

Mrs. Catherine Bradford spent 
several days with relatives in Ris- 
ing Sun, Ind., this week. 

Mrs. Bertha Sutton spent Wed- 
nesday in Cincinnati, O. 

Mrs. Lizzie Smith, of Be lie view 
was the guest Sunday of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cliff Sutton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rogers are 
the proud parents of a new baby 
boy. 

Miss Rachel Pottinger spent the 
week-end in Cincinnati, O. 

Mrs. Denniston, of Ohio was vis- 
iting Mr. and Mrs. Harry Batchel- 
or and Mrs. Robt. Denniston and 
son, Sunday. 



"! 



SMITH'S GROCERY 

We Deliver — Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, ... KENTUCKY 



MIAMI CHAMPION CORN, 
GREEN LIMA BEANS 



...... 



.No. 2 can 12c 
No. 2 can. 24c 
FLAKE HOMINY '• Per lb. 8c 



GRAIN HOFTNY ... 

BISQLICK, 

AUNT JEMIMA PANCAKE FLOUR 
MINUTE TAPIOCA * 
EVERFRESH COFFEE 










per lb. 6c 

. .large size 35c 

.;:. i5c 

13c 

.per pound 35c 

APPLES, eating or cooking pound 10c 

CARROTS large bunch 12c 

TURNIPS 2 pounds 15c 

CABBAGE Per pound 6c 

LEAF LETTUCE per pound 15c 

DILL PICKLES quart 25c 

BOLOGNA per lb. 23c 

HAM SAUSAGE per pound 40c 

CHUCK ROAST per pound 30c 

PLATE ROAST per pound 20c 

STEAK, all kinds per pound 45c 






■ 



OPA RELEASE OF 
WOMEN'S FOOTWEAR 



DAILY PROOF YOU DO SAVE HERE 



Odds and ends, 
all sizes in the 
group but not in 
every style. 




.00 



• Real Leather Soles 

• Gabardine Uppers . 
•Leather Uppers 



No Lay-Aways 
No Exchanges 
Every Sale Final 



•Low Heels 
•Medium Heels 
•High Heels 



NO RATION STAMPS NEEDED 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 

627 Madison Avenue Covington CO. 1430 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day en- 
tertained Mr. Day's sister, Mrs. 
Walter Johnson and daughter 
Wanda, of Cincinnati over the 
week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos Pennington 
and daughter "Judy, of. Dayton, O., 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Levi Penning- 
ton, Saturday and Sunday. 

Mrs. Marion Stephenson has 
returned home from the hospital. 
We wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Louise Stephenson visited 
her husband Pvt. Lebus Stephen- 
son who is with the U. S. Army in 
Georgia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Flynn of 
Hamilton, are visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. Leo Flynn and Mr. Flynn's 
mother, Mrs. Emma Flynn, of Wal- 
ton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day 
on Thursday of last week. 

Joan Farris and cousin J. J. 
Farris, who is home on furlough 
visited Lucy and Jimmy Penning- 
ton, Wednesday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Day and 
children visited Mr. and Mrs. A. 
P. Day, of Frogtown Road, on Mon- 
day. 

Jimmy Pennington is nursing a 
broken finger received while play- 
ing basketball. 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Pennington 
spent Friday in Covington. 

Mrs. Rachel Pennington visited 
Mrs. Herbert Day on Saturday. 



Wf BOUGHT FCTM WAR EONDS 



WAR LOAN 



To the People 

of this Community 

THINK! IT OVER * 

How about doing a little c"old tur- 
key thinking after you lay aside 
this newspaper tonight? 

You've got' a good job. The 
chances are there is someone else 
in your family, 
perhaps two or 
three, working. 
Your son or 
your brother — 
?may be away 
( 'at war. 

This war must 
end sometime. 
Your whole 1am- 
w ily, your neigh- 

bors, are praying it ends soon and 
those fighting boys of yours will 
come home safely. 

But will you be ready for what- 
ever happens when peace comes? 
Will you have something laid away? 
We're all hoping there'll be jobs 
aplenty, jobs which mean making 
something for somebody's happi- 
ness and not for somebody's sor- 
row. That's wher ) your War Bonds 
come into the pic - re. Sure, Amer- 
icans own billion; >f dollars of War 
Bonds now; and lytore this 4th War 
Loan ends they wfil have put away 
billions more. But how about you? 
You're the one That counts. The 
bigger the pUe of War Bonds you 
have when peace comes, the big- 
ger chance you'U have to slip right 
into the post-w r world you're 
dreaming about might. 

So "Let's AU E ck the Attack." 
, THE EDITOR. 



FOR SALE— Range, Southbend 
malleable, blue steel with white 
porcelain back. Good condition. 
Price $75.00. Phone Burlington 
208. 32-2t-pd. 

FOR SALE— 12 young ducks; also 
1 pair young geese. Carvin Good- 
ridge, Hebron, Ky. lt-p 



Z£ 



Carlisle county!^ farmers have a 
tobacco allotmenCjof only 110 acres 
but averages of 4400 to $900 per 
acre have been reported. 



FOR SALE — One Estate heater (not 
heatrola type); has new fire 
bowl and drum; good as new; 
will sell cheap. Call at Baptist, 
parsonage, Petersburg. lt-pd. 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all legal 
damage .claims, plus up to $500.00 
each to you and occupants of 
your car for injuries and med- 
ical services. Save cash. Phone 
Walter Gaines, Burl. 509; Joe 
Dringenburg, Flor. 860; Earl 
Aylor, Hebron, Ky.; Ryle Ewbank, 
Warsaw 2318. 32-5t-pd. 



WASHER— "Easy," 110-voIt elec- 
tric, good as new. See at Record- 
er Office. Burlington. lt-c 

FOR SALE— One oil incubator, 300- 
egg size; one Oilostat oil brooder, 
300-chick size. Both in good con- 
dition. Mrs. Elva Hughes, Flor- 
ence, R. D. Tel. Flor. 236. 32-2-p 



FOR SALE — Thor electric washer; 
living room sofa and chair with 
. springs; Jenny Lind bed. May 
be seen at Mrs. John S. Ryle's, 
at Rabbft Hash. 29-4t-p 



FOR SALE — 1935 Chevrolet coupe, 
first class Condition; five good 
tires, heatef. Can be seen at 
Martin Bros. Garage, or call 
Dolph Sebree, Florence 327. 1-p 



BANT AM PULLETS AND HENS 
WANTED— No roosters. Please 
inform me by mail your price, 
and number you have to sell. C. 
W. Meyers, Box 301, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. lt-pd. 



INCREASED YIELDS 

PAY COST OF TILE 



How ^increased corn yields paid 
the cost of tile drainage in one 
season is related by Elza Little of 
Wolfe county. He installed tile in 
a 15-acre field and then planted 
corn in the spring of 1943. The 
drainage brought an increased 
yield of 40 bushels to the acre . 

There is more land in Wolfe 
county that could be profitably 
drained, according to County Agent 
Charles E. Gabbard. He predicts 
increased interest in the rehabil- 
itation of good bottom lands. 



Prunes make a good fruit whip. 
Soak them oyer night, cook, add 
sugar, salt, and lemon juice and 
fold into stiffly beaten egg whites, 
then chill. 



EXECUTRIX' NOTICE 



WANTED TO BUY— Small farm, 
close in. Will pay cash. Must be 
worth the. money asked. , C. M. 
Emral, Florence, Ky., R. 1. lt-p 

2 



All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of .G. M. Harrison, 
deceased are requested to ^present 
same properly proven according to 
law and all persons' owing said 
estate are requested to (all and 
settle with the undersign© \ 

May Hal -ison, 
31-2t-p E: ecutrix 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 



Most everyone in this communi- 
ty have their tobacco stripped and 
sold at satisfactory prices. 

Mrs. Marshall Hankinson and 
baby spent Monday with Mrs. Se- 
bree. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emerson Bunger 
and children took dinner Tuesday 
with the Sebrees. 

Jean Schwenke was a dinner 
guest of the Sebrees, Wednesday. 

At the regular I business meeting 
Wednesday night at Big Bone 
Baptist Church, members voted 
unanimously to call brother Hogan 
as pastor for 1944. He will move 
to the parsonage soon. 

Several in this community have 
butchered beef this month. 

Sorry to hear that Mrs! Bertie 
Clore is in a critical condition. We 
wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Marshall Hankinson and sisters 
spent from Sunday until Tuesday 
of last week with Mr. Hankinson 
and wife. 

Buster Shlnkle spent Friday 
night with his uncle, Ross Shinkle. 

Emerson Bunger had Conner 
Carroll move another load of his 
furniture to his farm in Indiana, 
Saturday. Sjorry to see them move 
as we will miss them in this com- 
munity. 

Tom Huff called on the Sebrees, 
Saturday morning. 



CELEBRATES 3RD BIRTHDAY 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Setters gave 
a dinner in honor of their daugh- 
ter Priscilla Marie Setters' third 
birthday on Sunday, Jan. 23. 

Guests were: Alford Feldhaus, 
Jr., Sarah Marie Feldhaus, Violet 
June Feldhaus, Deha Fay Feld- 
haus, Paul Earl Feldhaus, Charles 
Henry Feldhaus, Lyde Grandman- 
en, Betty Grandmanen, Georgia 
Grandmanen, Janet Dames, Mr. 
and Mrs. Mitchell Kite and son, 
Randal Mitchell Kite, Mrs. Mildred 
Beebe and son, Robert Richard 
Beebe, John M. Feldhaus, June Ab- 
don, Margaret Smith and the host 
and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Setters. 

They all left at a late hour leav- 
ing Priscilla many nice and beaut- 
iful presents and wishing her 
many more happy birthdays. 



Jellies and jams are best stored 
in a cool, dark, dry place. If stor- 
ed on the top shelf of the kitchen 
or pantry, warm air may loosen 
the paraffin covering and let spoil- 
age organisms in. 



FARMS FOR SALE 

BUCKWOOD ROAD— 2% acres, 
nice modern brick home, lot of 
outbuildings, $11,000. 

DIXIE HIGHWAY— 8 acres, new, 
modern home; $10,000. 

3L HIGHWAY— 17 acres, 8-room 
home and outbuildings; $6000. 

TAYLOR MILL— 17 acres; large 
building; bus line; $4500. 

80 ACRES— 12 miles out; dairy 
farm; $8500. 

80 ACRES— 15 miles out; small 
house; $5500. 

88 ACRES— 20 miles out; team, 
tools and cow; $5500. 

80 ACRES — 7 miles out; electric, 
team if wanted; $8000. 

96 ACRES— Near airport; bldgs. 
$10,000. 

54 ACRES— Near Burlington; build- 
ings up to date; $8000. 

59 ACRES— Near Union; buildings, 
electric; $5750. 

58 ACRES— Near Independence; 
good buildings, electric; $6800. 

68 ACRES— Near Independence; 
buildings; $6000. 

90 ACRES — Near Independence; 
buildings; $5200. 

CAMPBELL COUNTY— Silver Grove 
39 acres, nice 5-room home, all 
good outbuildings; y 2 cash; price 
$6800. 

19 ACRES— 5 miles from Newport; 
7-room, electric, barn and out- 
buildings; $4500. 

80 ACRES — 10 miles from Newport; 
land 8-room hous e and barn, 
tractor land; $7000. 

FARMS all sizes, one to 500 acres; 
any location. You furnish the 
dough; I'll furnish the dirt. 

CHEAPEST FARM IN KENTON 
CO.— 124 acres for $4500, near 
Ryland, Ky., 1 mile west; 6-room 
frame house, basement; cistern 
and well; barn 40x60 fixed for 
cows; big cistern, double corn 
crib; lot of shade trees; road 
runs through farm; tenant house 
good condition; cistern, smoke- 
house. This limestone land ad- 
apted for alfalfa, tobacco and 
corn. Vacant; immediate posses- 
sion. Selling to settle estate. 

FARM AND MODERN HOME— 70 
acres of rich land, slightly slop- 
ing east and west; fenced and 
cross-fenced with woven wire (to 
hold a house) ; 3 -acre tobacco 
base; large barn racked for to* 
bacco; nice 7-room modern home 
in Al condition. Priced to sell at 
$10,500 or will exchange for 2- 
f amily house free of debt in city. 

BEST FARM BUY ON DUDLEY 
PIKE— 90 acres, good, 6-room 
plastered house, basement, elec- 
tric, dairy barn, double garage, 
chicken house, corn crib, sum- 
mer house. All kinds of fruit, 
water. Selling to settle estate. 
Price reduced. 

REL C. WAYMAN 

Office: 623 Washington St. 

Covington. Phone HE. 5107 

Ind. $064 



RADIO REPAIR^ at reasonable 
rates, colonial 1121. 509 Scott 

st. £f r tf 

BOONE COUNTY 

15 Acres on Dixie Highway, 4 miles 
south of Florence, iy 2 acres 
woods; peaches, apples, pears, 
cherries and grapes; good gar- 
den; 4-room one-floor plan' good 
home; electric, basement, i brick 
mantel and fireplace, front and 
rear porch, well screened rand 
window shades; double poultry 
house, barn; si 100I bus, Grey- 
hound bus serve e. Never before 
offered for saletf)*>5000.00. Try to 
best this one. ?** 

110 Acres iy 2 miles from Florence 
on Highway 18; all tractor land 
of excellent quality, most all in 
bluegrass and alfalfa; has always 
been well cared for; 7-room 
house, electric, large modern 
dairy barn with drinking foun- 
tains for cows' modern milk 
house, 2 other ' irns and several 
good outbuildlr s. All buildings 
in first class r, yah* and freshly 
painted. This U one of the best 
between Floregte and Burling- 
ton. First tin#advertised. .We 
will try to agrfe on a satisfac- 
tory price with* any interested 
purchaser. You will like this 
farm. 

125 Acres, 2 miles from Burlington 
on Highway 18; level to rolling 
land, about 2 acres tobacco base, 
3 acres orchard; 6-room house, 
large barn and other buildings 
needing repair. Located back 
from highway in center of farm. 
$7500.00, $340QOOO Federal loan. 

151 Acres, 2y 2 mi ?s from Burling- 

ton, fair location 3.8 acres tobacco 
base; sold . $1 )0.00 tobacco in 
1942 and* also t is year; 1 pond; 
8-room house, V-room house, 3 
barns, crib, m%at house, milk 
house, 3 poultry houses; a blue- 
grass and attain* hill farm. Tea- 
ant now in sniall house to crop 
this year, but fj£rge house ready 
for the purchaser any time. $5500 
one-half cash, balance $500.00 
per year, 4 percent interest. 

240 Acres, 1% miles from Burling- 
ton, tractor land; school bus, tel- 
ephone, mail route; 7-rm house, 
2 barns, concrete silo, garage, 
poultry house, milk house; over 
5 acres tobacco base. $70.00 per 
acre. Electric. ; 

A. B. RE AKER 
Office 12, Burling 3n, Ky. Res. 55 



WANTED — Man to work by day or 
month; do general farm work. 
Mrs. Pearl McGlasson & Son, 
Constance, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
388. 32-4t-pd 



FOR SALE — Coleman gasoline 
table top range, like new. Hi. 
6524. Mrs. Frank Wilson, Crest- 
wood Ave., Cold Springs, Ky. lc 



TOBACCO SEED— Warner's Gold- 
en Burley improved white bur- 
ley. Agents: L. A. Conner, B(ur- 
lington; B. F. Elliott, Walton; 
Walter Renaker, Verona; or by 
mail. $1.50 oz., 75c V 2 oz. day 
Bedford, Cynthiana, Ky. 31-6t-c 



FOR RENT— Kenton farm on East 
Bend road. Will rent to person 
who can furnish equipment; 8.3 
acre tobacco base; to raise 15 
acres of corn; hay to cut; can 
furnish house with electric. Edna 
Doan, 407 Scott St., Covington, 
Ky. 31-2-p 



NOTICE— We have decided to con- 
tinue our sawing business and 
will be open at all times; also 
good line of sleds for sale. W. A. 
Waters, Limaburg, Ky. 30-4t-p 



FOR SALE— Upright piano, Fisher 
make; ebony case; good condi- 
tion. Price, cheap. Call Mrs. 
Grace Castleman, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. 39. 31-tf. 



FOR SALE— Grunow electric re- 
frigerator; large size; good con- 
dition. Boitman Bros., Burling- 
ton, Ky., R. 2. lt-pd 



FOR SALE — Good work horse, 7 
years old, will work anywhere; 
weighs between 1300 and 1400 
lbs.; also harness. John Hop- 
perton, Burlington, Ky., R. 1. 
Tel. Heb. 146. 3>2t-p 



ernsey cows, 5 

2 close spring- 

od tested; sev- 



FOR SALE— 5 
years old, 3 fre 
ers, T. B. and b! 
eral fresh Jerseys; 2 Shorthorns 
with calves by side. M. C. Fisher, 
Florence, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Erlanger, 807 Dixie 
Highway. Vacant, 6-room house, 
bath, city water, gas . and sewer. 
Nice lot. Garage. $3500. Dollie 
Gray, 45 Forest Ave., Erlanger, 
Ky. Dixie 7508. lt-c. 



FOR SALE— One Oliver 3 horse rid- 
ing plow, with rrlling cutter and 
joiner. R. L. W son, Union, Ky. 
Tel. Flor. 751. \t-p 

LOST, STRAYED>OR STOLEN— 
German shortha^r pointer; liver 
and liver and vttiite, ticked on 
white. Name on collar. W. G. 
Hargis, 24 E. 3rd St., Covington, 
Ky. lt-pd 



LOST— Black pigskin glove at Bur- 
lington or Hebron school on 
night of Janviry 15. Finder 
please return t Bobby Sroggin, 
or Mrs. Austir Scroggin, Bur- 
lington, Ky., RVJ. lt-C 



FOR RENT — 64-acre farm on E- 
Bend Rd.; tenant to furnish team 
and tools; to milk cows and raise 
crops on shares. Must furnish 
reference. Mrs. Rena Presser, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 2. lt-p 



FOR SALE — Wagner piano in A-l 
shape; has had the best of treat- 
ment. Price $40.00. Mrs. Alton 
Buckler, Burlington, Ky., at Dam 
38. 32-2t-p 



FOR SALE — 26 Sheep, 2 and 3 years 
old; one Hampshire buck, eligible 
to register; and 95 bales of No. 
1 timothy hay. C. T. Easton, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1. Phone 
274. 32-2t-p 



INCOME TAX — Save money by 
having your tax return properly 
filed. My system, no long wait- 
ing. Same guide that Internal 
Revenue men use. Evenings and 
week-ends. Rates reasonable. R. 
V. Lents, Constance, Ky. 32-4t-p 



FOR SALE — 75 native good stock 
ewes, located near Owenton. J. 
A. Lee, Glencoe, Ky. Tel. Avon 
5420. 32-2t-c 



GET YOUR TOBACCO SEED AT 
CONNER'S LUNCH ROOM— I 
have Ky. 41A. This seed is the 
latest developed by. the Experi- 
ment Station, highly resistant to 
root rot, quick grower, high yield- 
ing. Also No. 16 Root Rot Resist- 
ant. Both of these seeds are 
certified by the State. The old 
standby Warner's Golden Burley. 
Come in, get the seed to produce 
the kind of tobacco your ground 
requires. *L. A. Conner, Burling- 
ton, Ky. 30-tf 



WANTED TO RENT— Either cash 
or share, 50 acres or better. Can 
furnish my own team and. tools. 
Harry V. Lorentz, Florence, Ky., 
R. 1. 29-4t-ch. 

WANTED— Tenant to raise 2y 2 to 
3 acres of tobacco on shares, and 
to. work by day; house and gar- 
den furnished. G. B. Yates, 
Idlewild, Ky. Tel. Burl. 259. 31 2c 



FOR SALE— DeLaval magnetic 
electric milker; practically new. 
W. O. Rector, Petersburg, Ky-., R. 
D. Tel. Burl. 372. 31-tf 



FOR SALE— 128-acre farm located 
4 miles west of Union on Grange 
Hall-Burlington road; 3-acre to- 
bacco base; 3 -room house; dairy 
barn and all necessary outbuild- 
ings. Farm in good state of cult- 
ivation. This farm being sold to 
settle estate. E. A. Connelly, Ex- 
ecutor. Address 449 Palace Ave., 
Erlanger, Ky. 31-3-pd. 



WANTED— Lady to clean office 
and wash windows one day each 
week. Apply Forest Lawn Mem- 
orial Cemetery, Erlanger. Ask for 
Jim Owens, Phone Dixie. 7172. 

31-2t-pd. 



FARM — 121 Acres; 15 acres tobac- 
co land, rest bluegrass pasture 
hillsides and ridges; one half 
mile from Rising Sun on State 
road 262; all buildings have elec- 
tric; electric pump furnishes 
water for house barn and all 
outbuildings; nine-room home, 
basement, bath, all in good re- 
pair and psAnt; large barn with 
stanction for milking; large silb; 
steel crib; garage and many 
small buildings; 2-acre tobacco 
base; everything in good repair. 
Only five minutes or less to 
County Seat town. Mail and 
school bus. Owner near 80 years 
with no help, and will sell rea- 
sonable. Others farms for sale. 
JOHN R. WOODS, Rising Sun, 
Indiana. Phone 30. lt-c 



WANTED — Waitress, age 18 to 25; 
steady work, with good pay; 6 
days a week. Also woman, white 
or colored for cleaning and 
laundry, 4, days a week. Appli- 
cants must apply in person at 
Doc's Place, Dixie Highway, be- 
tween Florence and Erlanger. 1-c 



FOR SALE! — Fresh cows; 16 pigs, 
and one Poland China boar, wt. 
250 lbs. Kirtley McWethy, Union, 
Ky., R..1. Tel. Flor. 403. lt-p 



GUITARS— $15 up; Roy Acuff 
and other books. String and 
accessories. Hanser Jewelry and 
Music, 5lS*/ 2 Madison, Coving- 
ton, Ky. . lt-c 



WISCONSIN DAIRY COWS— 15 

head of heavy producing Hol- 
stein dairy cows have arrived for 
your inspection; all T. Bi and 
Bang tested; these are all record 
cows with plenty of quality. Also 
' 25 head of horses; week's trial 
given. AU stock must be as 
represented or money refunded; 
easy payments can be arranged. 
GENERAL DISTRB3UTORS, 30 E. 
Second St., Covington, Ky. Open 
Sunday. lt-ch. 



DO YOU NEED A BULL?— I have 
several animals I will loan to 
good caretaker. J. B. Walton: Tel. 



Burl. 643. 



lt-ch. 



WANTED — Porcelain sink iiij>good 
condition. Phone Flor. 595. lt-c 



WANTED— Tenant, to raise 6 to 10 
acres of tobacco; corn and other 
crops on shares. H. L. Kirby, 
Big Bone Church Road. -Phone 
Flor. 957. 30-3t-pd 

FOR SALE— 4-Room house, furn- 
ace, running water, garage in 
basement; room for bath, with 
Vi-acre lot. Call Burl. 688. Leon 
E. Ryle, located at McVille, Ky., 
near Dam 38. 30-tf. 



FOR RENT— 40-Acre farm located 
4y 2 miles from Florence; con- 
crete block barn; plenty of wat- 
er; 65 apple trees; 900 ft. grape 
arbor. Share or money rent. Im- 
mediate possession. Apply Ben 
Anten, Florence, Ky. Tel. 21. 30-p 



FOR SALE— 50 tons of straight 
timothy and timothy and clover 
mixed hay. Ralph Jones and 
Dave Gaines, Tel, Flor 81Q3-J or 
Heb. 221. 29-4t-pd 



LET HELM help increase your 
poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years contest 
winners; official world's records; 
government approved; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. qjuly31 



WANTED— Woman to work in 
kitchen and assist with cooking. 
Swan Restaurant. Tel. Dixie 
7555. 22-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf. 



BE SAFE— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

LIVING ROOM SUITES 
$59 Up 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike St. Cov. Co. 1751 









K^ICTORY 

Mi buy 

Iml UNITED 
' VFJH STATES 

«lf WAR 

//a^BONDS 

■ «K AND 
,^H\ STAMPS 



| 



The Boone County Reco 




SERVG AMD 
CONSERVE 



ESTABLISHED 1875 






I 






VOLUME 68 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February 3, 1944 



1 



^' 



.f*C* 




NUMBER 33 



TOTAL OF $197,987 
IS SUBSCRIBED 



IN FOURTH WAR BOND DRrVE 
— BELLEVDZW FIRST PRE- 
CINCT TO RAISE QUOTA WITH 
BEAYER SECOND. 





it 



Subscription for the week ending 
January 29th amounted to $129,- 
474.25 which brings our total sub- 
scriptions to $197,98730 so far in 
the Fourth War Loan Drive. In 
addition to this we have received 
official notice that the Standard 
Oil Company of Kentucky has al- 
located $2000.00 of its subscription 
to Boone County. We have also 
received notice that the Federal 
Land Bank of Louisville has al- 
located $3000.00 of its subscription 
to Boone County. The Federal Land 
Bank, not being a commercial bank 
receiving deposits, is permitted to 
subscribe for bonds the same as 
an individual in this drive, and 
counts on quotas. The people of 
Boone County appreciate these 
two subscriptions which came as a 
surprise and unsolicited. 

We understand the Union Light, 
Heat and Power Company placed a 
$3000.00 subscription through the 
Florence Deposit Bank which is in- 
cluded in the total above, and 
counts on the quota of the Flor- 
ence precinct. The allocations of 
the Standard Oil Company and 
the Federal Land Bank will count 
on the quota of the County as a 
whole. 

The Belleview precinct is the 
first to report 'over the top" in its 
quota, with Beaver following a 
close second. Several other pre- 
cincts report that they are confi- 
dent of exceeding their quotas. 
With a little work and a close can- 
vas by the precinct chairmen and 
their workers, we believe ev-?ry 
precinct can raise its quota. Many 
people wait to be solicited. Be sure* 
to see everyone. 

There is only one more issue of 
this paper before the close of the 
drive February 15th. Let's have 
the full quota raise before this 
coming Saturday night as our re- 
ports must be prepared and given 
to the press on Monday for the 
previous week's subscription. Boone 
County must, not fail! The eyes 
of our soldiers are upon us. What 
is your answer to them? What will 
be the opinion of our own Boone 
County soldiers who are in camps 
and on the firing lines if our quota 
is not raised? 

Your suoserlptlon may be the 
means of saving the life of one of 
your neighbor boys. Can you sleep 
soundly at night if you have not 
subscribed liberally? Go back to 
your bank and make another sub- 
scription before February 15th. 
Don't expect someone to come to 
see you. This is your war!. The 
soldiers need your help! We have 
only raised 40 percent of our 
quota. 



Man Who Eye-Witnessed 
Japanese Barbarism Speaks 
To The American People 

The following statement by 
Commander Melvin H. McCoy, U. 
S. N., one of the survivors of Jap- 
anese terrorism now in this coun- 
try, speaks for itself. Commander 
McCoy, who escaped from a Jap- 
anese prison camp, speaking on 
behalf of the men still in Japanese 
hands, has requested that this 
message be transmitted to the Am- 
erican people: 

"Jap brutality is beyond descrip- 
tion. I would not wish any more 
of our boys to have the same ex- 
perience. I am sure that if those 
prisoners still in Jap hands could 
send a message to the United 
States, they would ask that the 
home front back them up by buy- 
ing as many War Bonds as they 
can during the Fourth War Loan 
Drive. 

"And if we can get a message 
back to them that Americans are 
supporting the fighting front, I am 
sure that their spirits would be 
given a needed lift, despite the 
brutual treatment. * 

"I surge all of you, those with 
brothers, son and fathers who are 
seeing action in the Pacific theater 
to back them up by buying bonds 
so that they would have the neces- 
RaT" supplier to avenge our men 
who have suffered at the hands of 
the Jap:,." 

There is no way we who stay at 
home can avenge this revolting 
cruelty. What we can do is path- 
etically little. If all of us put every 
cent we own into War Bonds, it 
would still be only the humblest 
gesture to the boys who are doing 
the fighting, the suffering, the 
dying. 



4-H CLUBS STRESS 
QUALITY WORK 



FIVE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX 
BOYS AND GIRLS COMPLETE 
937 WAR PROJECTS DURING 
PAST YEAR. 



_ 



EQUALIZATION 

BOARD MEETS 



PAGE "BELIEVE IT 
OR NOT" 

A farmer near Burlington 
purchased 27 acres of land 
without any improvements, 
a few years ago for $500.00. 
The past year he plowed 11 
acres of this land for corn 
and tobacco and has sold 
$2300.00 worth of tobacco and 
has 260 bushels of corn. 
*********** 



FARMERS CAN 
HELP IN CHANGES 



THAT MAY FOLLOW WAR, SAYS 
DEA N T HOM AS P. COOPER OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF KEN- 
TUCKY. 



John Walton 



FEBRUARY 7TH TO REVIEW 1943 
ASSESSMENT RECENTLY COM- 
PLETED BY COUNTY TAX 
COMMISSIONER. 



Peanut Removed From 

Lung Of Burlington Child 

A peanut, lodged in the lung of 
Billy Eddins, six-year-old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Eddins of Bur- 
lington, was removed by specialists 
at Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, 
Monday night, according to Dr. M. 
A. Yelton, local physician. 

The child is reported to be doing 
nicely at this writing. 



Homemakers To Have 

Bake Sale At Florence 



The Florence Homemakers' Club 
,111 sponsor a bakery sale at the 
lorence drug store on Saturday, 

Bbruary 5th from 9:30 to noon, 
donations will toe thankfully 
bceived. 



The Boone County Board of 
Equalization will convene Monday, 
February 7th at the office of the 
County Tax Commissioner for the 
purpose of reviewing the 1943 tax 
assessment and to hear any and 
all complaints regarding the as- 
sessment as of July 1, 1943 which 
has recently been completed by 
Wilton Stephens, Tax Commission- 
er. 

The Boa"rd will be in session 
from 9 to 4 p. m. each day, and 
persons desiring to be heard on 
any matter can do so during these 
hours, and action will be" taken ac- 
cording to the judgment of the 
supervisors. 

The board is composed of three 
members from various parts of 
the county. They are L. D. Ren- 
neckar, of Florence; Hubert Con- 
ner, of Hebron and Hugh Step- 
hens, of Union, assisted by the Tax 
Commissioner, who Will be present 
at all times. . 





SPECIALIST WILL 
VISIT BOONE CO. 



FOR SPECIAL MEETING WITH 
ORCHARD MEN ON WEDNES- 
DAY, FEBRUARY 16— FRUIT 
GROWERS URGED TO ATTEND 



W. W. Magill, fruit specialist, 
College of Agriculture, will meet 
with Boone County growers in two 
planning meetings on Wednesday, 
February 16th, according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. 

The morning meeting will start 
at 10:00 a. m., from the county 
agent's office in Burlington, fol- 
lowed witji a field trip to one of 
the local orchards. The afternoon 
meeting will be, held at 1:00 p. m. 
at the farm of Wijliam H. Moore, 
Hebron, Ky. 

Boone County growers produce 
some^of the highest quality fruit. 
Insect and disease control are two 
of the most difficult factors in 
quality fruit production. The an- 
nual winter fruit planning meet- 
ings aid growers in analyzing their 
past year's production problems 
and in planning their new year's 
production program. ' 

All fruit growers are cordially 
invited to j attend one or both of 
the above meetings. 



Attends Farm And 

Home Convention 



Lloyd Siekmari, W. G. Kite, J. C. 
Acree, O. D. Perkinson and H. R. 
Forkner were among the Boone 
County delegation attending the 
annual Farm and Home Conven- 
tion held at the College of Agri- 
culture at Lexington the past week. 

Those attending report one of 
the best farm improvement meet- 
ings held todate. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Riddell, of 
Florence entertained Sundav, Mr. 
and Mrs. N. Zimmerman and fam- 
ily, Miss Mary Lutes, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clay Byland, Mr. and Mrs. Qxner 
Stubbs and guest of honor, Sgt. 
Lewis C. Riddell and wife, of Col- 
umbus, S. C. 



Eighteen Boone County 
Men Receive Examination 



Eighteen Boone County men 
were sent from Draft Board No. 9, 
Burlington to Cincinnati Saturday 
for their pre-induction examin- 
ation, according to C. O. Kelly, 
Clerk of the Board. 

Thirty-two men will receive their 
preinduction examination today, 
February 3rd and two colored men 
will -be examined February 16th. 
Twenty-one days will be^ allowed 
each man before reporting for ac- 
tive duty after the final physical 
examination regardless of what 
branch of service he may enter. 



Four-H Club Boy 

Makes Good Average 



Clifford Lee Barnes, Burlington 
4-H club boy sold 480 pounds of 
burley tobacco for $261.82, making 
an average of $54.80 per 100 pounds. 



Legion Honors Seaman Ruckel 



Seaman Second Class Roy Glenn 
Ruckel, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ern- 
est Ruckel, 311 West Market St., 
and first member of the Union 
Chapel Church to give his life in 
the service of his country in 
World War II, was honored Sun- 
day afternoon at memorial rites at 
the church, southwest of here. 

Attended by the congregation of 
the church and other friends, the 
service was conducted by Byron 
Cox Post of the American Legion, 
which presented the parents with 
a Gold Star citation in memory of 
their son. 

Representing the Legion were: 
Post Commander Julian G. Carter, 
who presided during the ceremony; 
Legion Chaplain Ralph E. Gron- 
seth/who presented the Gold Star; 
the Post Vice Commander Walter 
B. Remley, who paid a tribute to 
the young sailor. Color bearers, 
Forrest A. Ward, and Robert Payne 
color guards, Fred White and 
Branc B. Brown, and squad com- 
mander, Reed Morrow. 

Others present from the Legion 
were Paul Machery and Russell 
Hesler, former commanders of the 
post, and Ralph Hoffa. 

Also participating in the cere- 
mony was a girls* trio from the 
First Baptist Church choir, which 
sang two numbers. 

The church was represented by 
its pastor, the Rev. J. R. Elst'on, 
who gave the benediction. 

Advancing of the national and 
post colors, and singing of the na- 
tional anthem opened the service, 
after which the Legion tribute was 
given. 

At the church alter a miniature 
scene, symbolic of the final resting 
place of those who die in their 
country's defense, added its dig- 
nity to the occasion. 

Included in the scene were a 
white cross, bearing the sailor's 
hat, hte nation's flag and 
a flaming urn. arranged by Vice 
Commander Remley, who had 
charge of this phase of the service. 

Seaman Ruckel, who as 19 years 
old when he enlisted, lost his life 
in December, 1942. while serving as 
a member of an armed guard on 
a merchant vessel. He was born 
at Hebron and attended New 
Market High School. 



Texas, a former resident of Boone 
County, passed away at his home 
January 14th after an illness of a 
year, following a paralytic stroke. 

Dr. Walton was a physician for 
many years with offices in Cincin- 
nati, having moved to Texas only 
a few years ago. 

He is survived by his widow, one 
daughter. Mrs. J. B. Leslie, of Long 
Beach, Calif., and a brother Ross 
Walton, of Chicago, 111. 



Boone County 4-H Club started, 
their 1944 organization program,! 
with meetings in Hamilton, Verona x 
and Walton communities on Mon-J 
day of this week, according to the] Dr. John Walton, of McAUen 
County Agent's office. Hebron, 
Constance, Petersburg, Grant, Flor 
ence, Burlington, and New Haven 
Clubs will also complete their new 
4-H organizations this week. 

Quality war time project work 
will feature the 1944 program. Five 
hundred seventy-six boys and girls 
the past year completed 937 war 
projects. The new year's projects 
will include dairy, poultry, sheep, 
pigs, garden, corn, tobacco, cloth- 
ing, canning, foods and room im- 
provement. 

Four-H club work is open to all 
rural boys and girls between the 
ages of 9 and 21 years, who agree 
to carry improved agricultural and 
home economics work. Members 
will keep business records- on their 
project activities. Achievement 
certificates are awarded by the 
Extension Service and the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, to those members 
who satisfactorily complete their 
work. 

Enrollment applications may be 
secured from local 4-H club of- 
ficers, adult leaders, the schools of 
the county, or home demonstration 
agent's offices. 



Siron Farm Sold To 

Latonia Man This Week 



R. M. Burns of Latonia purchas- 
ed the 15-acre farm of Mrs. Susan 
B. Siron located on the Dixie 
Highway about four miles south 
of Florence this week, through A. 
B. Renaker. Mr. and Mrs. Burns 
will move to the farm this month, 
as soon as possession can be ar- 
ranged. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 
Sunday, Feb. 6, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 



ORDER PROTON 
FEEDS AT ONCE 



SAYS COUNTY AGENT— ORDERS 
PROBABLY LIMITED TO 30- 
DAY SUPPLY— NO PROMISE 
MADE TO FILL ORDERS. 



Boone County farmers who are 
in need of protein feed to supple-r 
ment the shortages of home grown 
feeds should list their orders im- 
mediately with the county AAA 
office in Burlington, according to 
H. R. Forkner, County Agent. 
Orders will probably be limited to 
a thirty-day supply. The protein 
supplement will either be soybean 
meal or cottonseed meal. 

There is no" definite promise that 
orders can be filled. The War Food 
Administration is supposed to allot 
20 percent of the protein feed sup- 
ply to farmers direct. The hand- 
ling of the orders will be through 
the County AAA committee. 

Protein supplement has been one 
of the bottlenecks in livestock pro- 
duction. There is a possibility that 
farmers may get some relief from 
this shortage, by filing orders now 
for their needs. 

The County Farm Bureau has 
been working on a solution to the 
local protein shortage and recom- 
mends this method of approach. 



DROP OF 37.5 PER 
CENT IS SHOWN 



IN BURLEY SALES DURING PAST 
WEEK— AVERAGE FOR WEEK 
IS $44.38— STATE AVERAGE IS 

$44.40. 

; 

Volume of sales on the nation's 
burley tobacco markets dropped 
37.5 per cent during the past week, 
as compared with the previous 
week. 

The approach to the end of the 
auction season also found the 
general quality of offerings slight- 
ly lower, causing the average for 
the week to decline to $44.38 a 
drop of 30 cents from last week, 
the War Food Administration re- 
ported. The average has dropped 
slightly each week since the be- 
ginning of the season. 

Gross sales for all states totaled 
29,747,832 pounds, compared with 
48,287,152 for the week before. 
Kentucky sold 26,245,706 pounds of 
the week's total with all markets 
still operating except Greensburg, 
which closed for the season. The 
state average was $44.40. 

Several Kentucky markets were 
scheduled to close this week, it was 
announced, and the WFA reported 
that 90 percent of the estimated 
season's crop has been marketed. 

The season's total burley sales 
to date are 364,541,781 pounds for 
an average of $45.67. 



• < 



How farmers as indiv uals can 
prepare for postwar ch jiges was 
recently discussed in ar&- address 
by Dean Thomas P. Coprer of the 
University of Kentucky college of 
Agriculture and Home Economics. 

As individuals, farmer* can do 
much to soften possible postwar 
shocks, he' said. "Indivtiual re- 
sponsibility is very great," he de- 
clared. "Perhaps the most import- 
ant single step is to enter the post- 
war period free of debt or at least 
have debts so reduced that thev 
can be easily handled. 

"If there is a*ny one lesson that 
should have been learned from the 
last war, it is the importance of 
having one's financial affairs in 
good position. , 

"During this period of shortages 
of all kinds, it is imports* it to set 
aside funds for replenish »ents in 
the future. Agriculture is using 
up its structures, equipm nt and 
machinery at a more r» rid rate 
than it is able to obtain Replace- 
ments. Therefore, it is w} lb to in- 
vest in bonds sufficient Amounts 
from income during the waj period 
to make possible the r^cessary 
changes in the home, and. to per- 
mit the purchase of the > required 
machinery, equipment, „ trucks, 
automobiles, freezing units, etc., to 
enable operation of the farjn to the 
best advantage. 

"This is the time td set up 
funds for the modernizatioli of the 
home that you and your Vffe may 
have long planned; for the con- 
struction c* new barns and' other 
buildings, fences, and for the de- 
velopment of needed conveniences; 
electricity, of course; ample water 
supply, a real problem ii$ many 
areas of the state; runninj 'water 
in the home and barn; ar i sew- 
age disposal. Too, the in< vidual 
should look forward to the ^build- 
ing of the soil, in the event it has 
been farmed too hard; to develop 
the woodlots, and to see that they 
are protected. It is the line to 
provide for the education at the 
younger children. 

"thousands of our farmers will 
make such plans, set aside the 
money safely for the f uti re and 
utilize it as the material th y need 
becomes available in the ostwar 
period. It will do- much -jf help 
meet many of the problemfewhich 
would otherwise develop <q£ that 
time • . • * 

"Then after the war we 'will do 
the reasonable things that.provide 
for better and more comfortable 
living, education and many other 
enterprises we should undertake, 

"Through such procedure, we 
shall probably find ourselves," in a 
position to meet whatever, may 
come, instead of being impoverish- 
ed through speculation or t? e ex- 
pectation of a continuance o war- 
time prices and wartime dei and. 

"Agriculture's problem w ft be 
different, but the foresigl t and 
common sense of farmers w J en- 
able them to meet the siti ttions 
as they arise." 



Special Study Course 
Will Be Held At Local 
Methodist Church 






Several Report Good 

Prices For Tobacco 



Norris Berkshire of near • eters- 
burg, sold his tobacco c p of 
approximately 5,000 pounds >r an 
average of $55.30 per hundr* 4. His 
crop was sold at the KentonAoose 
Leaf Tobacco Warehouse, ^ring- 
ton. >▼ 

Dawson Day, of the Woolper 
vicinity sold approximately 3.000 
pounds of burley over the Kenton 
Loose Leaf floor recently for an 
average of $56.25 per hundred. 

Beemon • Bros., of near He »eful 
Church sold 1710 pounds o to- 
bacco over the Covington flot for 
an average of $55.64. 

Edward Black, of Burlingto,. , R. 
1 sold 3950 pounds of tobaca,) at 
'the Big Burley Warehouse Co., "fear- 
roll ton on Tuesday, February L for 
an average of $54.48 per huriped. 
The high basket sold for $58. r 

M. J. Sullivan sold 3476 pounds of 
tobacco for a total of $1815.46 at 
Big Burley Warehouse, Carrollton, 
Tuesday. 



LLOYD SOCIETY WILL MEET 

The Lloyd Society will hold its 
regular monthly meeting at the 
home of Mrs. Nell Blankenbeker, 
Saturday, February 5th. 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 

Sunday, Feb. 6, Bible Schoo at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Woodford Cri. er, 
Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 



"The Church After The War," 
written by Bishop Frances J. Mc- 
Connell of the Methodist Church 
will be used as a basis for study 
and discussion at the Burlington 
Methodist Church, beginning Sat- 
urday night. 

The study will embrace six con- 
secutive Saturday evenings, begin- 
ning at 7:30 p. m. 

This is a very helpful and in- 
formative book, explaining the 
needs of the day, and the role the 
church must play in the post war 
world. The church needs to be 
informed and inspired to do her 
full part "when Johnny comes 
marching home." 

The public is invited to attend 
this profitable study i 




Hebron Couple 

Celebrate Golden 
Wedding Anniversary 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Barnes cele- 
brated their golden wedding anni- 
versary at their home near Hebron 
on Sunday, January 30th. 

Mr. Barnes is 75 ana. Mrs. Barnes 
is 68. They have eight children, 
seventeen "grandchildren and two 
great grandchildren. Their young- 
est son in service for three years is 
now somewhere in New Guinea. 

Those present to enjoy the oc- 
cason were Mrs. Ota Mae Fleek, 
Mr. and Mrs. Jess Barnes and fam- 
ily, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Barnes and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Crad- 
dock and children, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Black and son and Mr. and 
Mrs. Amaul Hensley. 



MAN RELEASED TO 
GRANT OFFICIALS 



1 



AFTER BEING ARRESTED ON 
FORGERY CHARGE — WDLL 
FACE NINE SIMILAR CHARGES 
IN GRANT COUNTY. 



;.x 



j? 






Joseph Sturgeon, 28 formerly of 
Williamstown was arrested Sunday 
at his lodgings, Bullock Pen Creek 
Road by Sheriff J. T. Williams of 
Boone County and Deputy Kenton 
County Sheriff, Frank Dickey on. a 
charge of forgery. 

Sturgeon was brought to Bur- 
lington where he was placed in jail 
and held until Tuesday, when he 
was released to Grant County 
Sheriff Lewis Henderson. Sturgeon 
will face nine forgery charges in 
Grant County, according to Boone 
officials. . . 

The warrant against Sturgeon 
was signed by James Morris, of 
^Verona, Ky. He is a truck driver 
employed by a trucking firm oper- 
ating between, Cincinnati and De- 
troit, according to Sheriff Williams. 
Cincinnati Man Fined 

Wm. V. Smith, of Cincinnati was 
arrested Monday afternoon on U. 
S. 25, near John's Truck Stop, by 
Deputy Sheriff Irvin Rouse and 
charged with reckless driving. 
When arraigned in Judge Cropper's 
court he was fined $29.50. 



' i 



SCARLET FEVER 
UNDER CONTROL 



ACCORDING TO DR. M. A. YE L 
TON, BOONE COUNTY HmtTE 
OFFICER— SEVERAL CASES RE- 
PORTED, i 



Although several cases of scar- 
let fever have been reported in 
the county, the situation is well in 
hand, according to Dr. M. A. Yel- 
ton, Boone County Health Officer. 

The latest victim of the disease, 
Mrs. Paris Kelly of McVille, is now 
much improved following thera- 
pentic dosage of antitoxin. She 
contracted the disease from her 
son, Dr.' Yelton stated. Remain- 
ing members of the family have 
received the prophylaxis and are 
under quarantine. 

No further spread of the disease 
is expected, Dr. Yelton stated. 
However, any person showing 
symptoms of the disease should 
be confined and the family physi- 
cian should be called immediate- 
ly. 



t 



Nurses Will Hold Meeting 

In Covington Tuesday 



Lieut. Leona Jackson of the U. S. 
Navy, will be the chief speaker at 
a meeting of Northern Kentucky 
Graduate Nurses' Association held 
at the Chamber of Commerce, Cov- 
ington, next Tuesday evening at 
6:30 p. m. 

Lieut. Jackson was one of five 
nurses who were in Guam at the 
time it fell. After two days of 
bombing, the Japanese occupied 
the island, and Lieut. Jackson was 
taken prisoner. . 

This is a dinner meeting and for 
lack of space only a limited num- 
ber may attend. The following 
Boone County people have reserva- 
tions: Mrs. Robert Brugh, Walton; 
Mrs. Jemmison Aylor, Miss Lucy 
Lee Grant and Miss Elizabeth 
Lowry. * 

Plans are under way to secure 
Lieut. Jackson for a Red Cross 
meeting at Walton high school, at 
which time Home Nursing Certifi- 
cates will be given out to the high 
school girls who have just com- 
pleted this course. 



4 



I 



Florence Homemakers 

Sponsor Paper Drive 

The Florence Homemakers' club 
will sponsor a waste paper drive 
Friday, February 4th according to 
an announcement made this week. 

Citizens of the community are 
asked to bring* -their waste paper 
to the Town HaU in Florence any- 
time during the week. Magazines, 
newspapers and cardboards are 
especially needed. 

Persons having paper they de- 
sire to have collected call Mrs. 
Harold Conner, Florence 28. 



Several Suffer Minor 
Injuries In Accident 
At Florence Thursday 



Three Army officers and their 
wives suffered minor injuries when 
the car in which they were riding 
and another auto collided Thurs- 
day night at Dixie Highway and 
Sanders Drive, Florence. 

The officers and their wives en- 
route to a California* airfield when 
the accident occurred. Riding in 
the auto driven by Lieut. Morris 
Solodky were his wife, Lieut. Leon 
Kirmayer and. his wife, and Flight 
Officer Zelij 'Tinkelstein and his 
wife. They were released after 
treatment at St. Elizabeth Hospit- 
al, Covington. 

The other car figuring in the ac- 
cident was driven by Marvin Tan- 
ner, of KentabQO, Florence. He 
escaped with shock. 



Hebron Five Win Over 

Burlington Friday 



Hebron's Cardinals defeated the 
Burlington Eagles Friday night 
on the Burlington floor by a 
score of 49-18. Hebron took an 
early lead and was never in 
trouble at any time during the 
game. Peeno led the attack for. 
Hebron with 14, while Presser hit 
the hoop for 10 for Burlington. 

In a preliminary game, Hebron 
emerged on the long end of 41-6 
count over the Burlington second 
string men. 

'Burlington's Independent team 
defeated the Hebron Independents 
in the final game of the evening 
by a score of 34 to 31. This game 
was interesting and hard fought 
throughout. 

New Haven took two games from 
Florence Friday night. Scores- for 
these games were not turned in. 



$3,000,000 BOOSTS 
TEACHER SALARIES 



STATE SENATE O. K.'S HOUSE 
BDLL ADVOCATED BY GOV- 
ERNOR WDLLIS— WILL MEAN 
AVERAGE OF $20.00 INCREASE. 



Legislative approval for adding 
$3,000,000 to public school teachers' 
pay was completed Monday night 
when the Kentucky Senate gave 
unanimous approval to a measure 
the House previously had adopted 
95 to 1. 

The supplemental pay, applying 
to the current scholastic year and 
retrocative to last July 1, was ad- 
vocated by Governor Willis who 
was expected to sign it in a few 
days. 

The measure affects some 18,000 
teachers, and Democratic Senator 
Roy McDonald, a Cadiz teacher, 
expressed hope it would "attract 
back 3,000 of the best-qualified 
teachers," who left the profession 
for better paying jobs. 

The money is to be distributed 
among the school districts on the 
basis of school population and Sen- 
ator McDonald estimated it would 
mean an average ol $20 more a 
month for teachers. 



* J 



- 



• ' 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



* 









i 






' . 



annNE cnuNTY REcnROEH 



A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 
RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY 



BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUB £ IN BOONE COUNTY 
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MEMBER 

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For Over Fifty Years 



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MEMBER 



KEtfft/cKY PRES! 
/^A SSOCIATION , 



NEEDED: RULES FOR 
RECONVERSION 

The attention focused on the 
current labor situation by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's request for a na- 
tional service act points up the 
wisdom of the policies of one of 
our major war producers, General 
Motors, in allocating its manufac- 
turing operations since the coun- 
try's prdduction of war materials 
was started in June, 1940. Since 
it is carrying the heaviest war 
production assignment in the na- 
tion and has a production army 
of more than 450,000 within the 
United States, the policies of this 
company are important to all 
Americans. 

C. E. Wilson, president of Gen- 
eral Motors, in testifying before 
the Truman Committee on future 
reconversion of war industry, stat- 
ed that it had been the com- 
pany's policy to try to obtain war 
orders for each of its plant cities 
and for every plant. He explain- 
plained that this was intended to 
protect the workers in those dif- 
ferent plants as well as to produce 
war equipment with the greatest 
efficiency and the least new floor 
space and machinery. This meant 
enabling the company's employes 
to continue working in their own 
communities, thus preventing un- 
necessary population shifts and the 
n 



disruption of communities, and 
avoiding some labor unrest. It 
meant also getting the war goods 
out as quickly as possible. It was 
good planning. 

Other policy points listed by Mr. 
Wilson and equally important to 
all Americans included active co- 
operation with the government 
from the beginning of the defense 
program in planning production, 
accepting trial orders, engineering 
cooperation, mass production of 
war materials for which produc- 
tion equipment was on hand or 
could be obtained, seeking orders 
for the more complicated war ma- 
terials — thus using the Corpora- 
tion's engineering and manufac- 
turing experience for the tough 
jobs and leaving the simpler jobs 
to smaller concerns, and undertak- 
ing war work in a quantity pro- 
portionate to the company's peace- 
time capacity — about .10 percent 
of the country's output of metal 
products. ■* 

Other policies established by the 
company in 1940 were to accept 
contracts of any type proposed by 
the government; — in other words, 
try to do business the way the 
customer wanted, to subcontract 
component parts for all war mat- 
erials to dependable and compet- 
ent contractors with the necessary 
production equipment, and to util- 
ize existing plants and equipment 
to the limit, requesting new facil- 
ities only when absolutely neces- 
sary. 

These rules, adopted long before 
Pearl Harbor, not'* only indicate 
how General Motors has been able 
to produce more than $5,000,000,000 
wortti of war materials since that 
day.^but also to point out how 
necessary is the establishment of 
fundamental policies in advance of 
a large undertaking. This applies 
to the present situation in which 
manufacturers are wondering what 
rules the government will lay down 
for reconversion. For as Mr. Wil- 



.££** 



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I PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. I 






COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

1 «m 

— 

| Deposits Insured Una tr the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 
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F. W. Kassebaum & Son, Inc. 

Authorized Dealer* 
''Rock of Ages" Barre Granite 

MONUMENTS 

■ - 

Aurora, Indiana 

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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 



son said in listing his company's 
policies, "we had eighteen montfts 
going in, and we should make some 
plans going out of the war." 

THE PAPER CRISIS 

According to reliable Washing- 
ton information less than 20,000 
more men set to work cutting pulp 
wood would solve the paper short- 
age crisis confronting the country. 
This additional manpower could 
cut sufficient pulp wood $o keep 
all the paper mills running. 

Here are some examples of the 
growing crisis in paper materials: 
The supply of wood pulp fell from 
980,000 tons in September 1942 to 
470,000 tons in November 1943. 
Stockpiles of waste paper dropped 
from 590.000 tons in October 1942 
to 220,000 tons in November 1943. 
The WPB thinks these inventories 
are below a workable minimum. 

Unless vigorous steps are taken 
to rebuild the raw materials stock- 
piles, there may be additional cur- 
tailments in paper allotments for 
newspapers, magazines, commerci- 
al printing, boxes, packages, books 
and the thousands of other uses to 
which paper is put. To meet all 
of the demands on even the cur- 
rent restricted allotments, 14,000,- 
000 cords of wood must be cut in 
the United States in 1944. 

Many , paper mills are closed 
down today because of lack of raw 
materials. Others are operating 
only a few days a week. Yet every 
paper requirement could be filled if 
the War Manpower Commission 
would recruit only 18,500 more men 
for work in wood cutting. 

Also, the problem could be part- 
ially solved if the Army Provost 
Marshall would assign additional 
prisoners of war to cutting wood. 
It is estimated that fewer than 500 
prisoners of war are engaged in 
this kind of work - in the United 
States at this time. It is said that 
the decision of using prisoners of 
war to cut wood rests with the 
local camp commanders. But sure- 
ly a directive from the War De- 
parment would encourage these 
commanders. Also, there are 10,- 
000 Japanese-American citizens 
Available in relocation centers who 
could perform this kind of work. A 
large Dart of the sugar beet crop 
was saved last fall by these Jap- 
anese-Americans. The U. S. Em- 
ployment Service has not made 
any effort to recruit these evacuees 
to cut wood. 

It is both a patriotic responsi- 
bility and a profitable enterprise 
for farmers and others who have 
wood lots to cut wood for pulp 
purposes. Every newspaper pub- 
lished in a farm area is in a po- 
sition to help farmers dispose of 
this wood to the paper mills. 

In England it is an offense to 
throw away as much as one wrap- 
ping from a package of cigarettes. 
We may not have come to that but 
it is certainly the responsibility of 
every American to save every bit 
of paper and turn it in or sell it to 
the paper salvage drive. 

Printers and buyers of printing 
must of course, conserve paper by 
accepting lighter weights of paper 
and by using smaller : sizes when 
possible. ** 

All in all, we believe the paper 
crisis can be overcome. The War 
Manpower Commission will have to 
bestir itself. Maybe a few letters 
written to Manpower Commission- 
er Paul V. McNutt in Washington 
urging that manoower be allocat- 
ed for wood cutting might help. 

The local and regional offices of 
the U. S. Employment Service can 
do a great deal to help this work 
along, and it would be interesting 
to see what would happen if a lot 
of our local citizens gave the facts 
of this situation to their local and 
regional offices of the U. S. Em- 
ployment Service and politely sug- 
gested that something be done 
about it. 

At a time when all of us are 
conserving paper and salvaging 
waste paper, surely the War Man- 
power Commission and the U. S. 
Employment Service can do their 
part and find the 18,500 workers to 
put pulp wood. 




Ambulance Service 



= LUDLOW, 



r. 
I 



Phone COlonial 2580 



KENTUCKY | 



* 



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PIIIIIIIH 



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H THE TEST OF TIME .. . g 

= After more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 
we can safely say thajyour organization has stood this stero- 
ls est and most exacting/of all trials. __ = 

| Chambers & Grubbs | 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 352 =E 

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Three hundred lockers have been 
rented in the frozen food bank 
soon to be built in Pendleton coun- 
ty. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pas tor 

Sunday School 10:0 Oa. m. ( CWT ) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT ) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 

Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. for Juniors 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at 1 
tend. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaugh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:30. 
You need your church. 



BELLEYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. ^ Guth, Pastor 

Sundar School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. I.igers, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone Is cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



EAST BEND METHODIST 

CHUDCH 
Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday evening at 7 p. in.; also 
every fifth Sunday morning and 
evening. 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
. Rev.. Root. Carter, Pastor 

-Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 

Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 

Church 12:0i E W. T. 

Evening services 8 p. m. E. W. T. 

FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even- 
ing 8 p. m. 

You are invited to come— wor- 
ship an ' work with us. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10; 00 a. m. Sunday Bchool. B. 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10' a. m. Harry 
Jarbo, Supt. 

We. invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, Supt. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p.m. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.> 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30 CWT. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. • 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m.,and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 

FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kid well, Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 

WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Ahrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 

Evening worship 8:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m. EWT. 

P rayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



BCLLITT SBCR C BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. 

Preaching first and third Sun. 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott. Pastor 

Sunday School euch Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) 7-6 Shintle, Supt 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. * 

Evening Service at 7:?i,. (C.W.T.) 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p. in. 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 

Of The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

i 

Lesson for February 6 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



JESUS FEEDS THE MULTITUDES 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 6:35-44; 8J-9. 

GOLDEN TEXT— I am the bread of life: 
he that cometh to the shall never hunger; 
and he that believeth on me snail never 
thirst— John 6:35. v 

■ 

Hungry! That word describes the 
crying need of the greater part of 
the world's population. Men who 
have vaunted themselves because of 
their ability and ingenuity have 
brought the nations of the earth into 
such awful confusion that even God's 
abundant provision cannot reach the 
needy ones. 

God is concerned about man's 
physical need just as truly as He is 
about spiritual needs. This story 
brings Christianity into action on a 
level that all will appreciate— the 
need of food for the body. It works 
there as it does everywhere. 

The supply of every need of man 
is God. "My God shall supply all 
your need according to his riches in 
glory by Christ Jesus'? (Phil. 4:19). 
Countless Christians have found it 
to be true that we may trust God — 
completely — and for everything. 

The stories of the feeding of the 
two groups of people show the wrong 
and the right attitude toward man's 
need. In two approaches to the 
problem the disciples were wrong. 
Then Christ showed them the right 
way. 

I. They Can Take Care of Their 
Own Need (6:35, 36). 

"Send them away"— that was the 
plea of the disciples when the multi- 
tude of those who had followed Him 
became hungry. The people were 
there because they were interested 
in Christ. They had come in a hurry 
(v. 33) and had nofc brought food. 
The problem was oh the disciples' 
hands, and they sought the easiest 
way out. Let them shift for them- 
selves — "Send them away." 4 

The church has followed their ex- 
ample in dealing with the social 
problems of the people down 1 through 
the years. The result is that being 
denied fellowship, comfort, and help 
by a church which was too busy 
building up a vast organization or 
a beautiful order of worship, the 
common people have respond- 
ed to the appeal of political leaders 
who have provided a substitute for 
what the church should have given 
them. 

When Jesus put upon them the di- 
rect responsibility to feed the people, 
the disciples -changed their "slogan" 
and said: 

II. We Should Like to Help, bat 
We Cannot (6:37). 

Reckoning hastily on what a small 
boy had brought for his lunch (trust 
an alert boy to be ready!), the 
disciples soon demonstrated that it 
was impossible to feed this great 
throng. (See similar reasoning in 
Mark 8:4). 

Logic is such a devastating thing 
when it operates apart from faith in 
God^ They were absolutely right in 
their reasoning and in their calcula- 
tions, but they had forgotten the one 
factor that really counted. Jesus was 
there, and Jesus is Go?, and God 
is omnipotent. fl 

As we face the needVf the world 
now and after the warrwe wonder 
how the peoples of other lands can 
be fed without depriving our own 
land of what it needs. R is a great 
problem, and we ought to pray for 
those who must work wfth it. 

But let us not forget that all that 
we have comes from Gpd, and that 
He is able to do "exceeding abun- 
dantly above all that we ask or 
think" (Eph. 3:20). The Christ who 
multiplied the loaves and fishes is 
our Living Lord today, and ready and 
able to do it again. 

III. Jesus Said, "I Have Com- 
passion on the Multitude" (6:38-44; 
8:1-0). 

He started right. Instead of shut- 
ting His heart against the tender de- 
sire to help, He let His love for 
the people control. Then instead of 
magnifying the difficulties, He mul- 
tiplied the provisions. And lo, there , 
was enough for all, and to spare. 

"He commanded . . and they 
did all eat" (w. 39, 42). When God 
speaks, all the limitations of the finite 
disappear, and the needs of men are 
fully met— with "twelve baskets full 
of fragments" left over! 

Note the orderly manner in which 
our Lord met this situation. Five 
thousand men, with women and chil- 
dren to swell the throng, were seat- 
ed on the grass. Jesus took the 
loaves and fishes and blessed them. 
You who forget to rerun thanks at 
the table, notice that quie and mean- 
ingful act. Then He 
loaves and divided the 
doubt they were multi 
disciples passed them 
people. ' 

God is able to do thatifcery thing 
even in our day. Perljaps not in 
just the same manneri but surely 
those who serve Him hay e marveled 
as they have seen that "little is 
much when God is in it,V Let those 
who labor in difficult places with 
limited resources take' heart— and 
trust God. 

Note the care with which the frag- 
ments were collected for future use. 
It took this. war to teach America 
how phsmefiiHv waFtrful it has Hppn 



<roke 

^shes 




BULLITTSVULE CHRISTIAN 
CHUBPE 

Noble Lucas, Minister 
Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 

at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 
Church School every Sunday at 

10 a. m. Ben Kottmye Supt. 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 3, 1904 



Hathaway i 

Arch Rouse and family, of this 
place, made a very pleasant trip 
to Mr. Rouse's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Tony Rue, of Belleview, one 
day last week. 

Joseph Rich and Raymond Smith 
spent last Sunday as guests of 
Nathan Smith. 

Erlanger 

Miss Fannie Cody has returned 
home after a pleasant visit with 
Miss Maydie Tanner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Aylor have re- 
turned from a visit with friends at 
Richmond. 

Hebron 

Miss Daisy Harding is staying 
with her sister, Mrs. Israel Rouse, 
who is ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Clore 
were calling on relatives in Ludlow 
on Monday. 

Petersburg „ 

I. S. Balsly, of Missouri, was the 
guest of J. M. Thompson and fam- 
ily one day last week. Jim andV 
Irvin used to be old neighbors 
years ago. 

Mrs. T. B. Mathews and daugh- 
ter, Miss Lola are spending several 
days visiting relatives in Coving- 
ton. 

Buffalo 

Mrs. C. M. Allen and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Feldhaus spent the day with 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bradford, last 
Sunday. 

The little daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Willis Arrasmith has pneu- 
monia. 

Flickertown 

Al Cox and bride and Ott Rect- 
or of Petersburg, were guests of 
Miss Julia Smith, last Friday. 

Born to Clayton Campbell and 
wife, on the 21st, a girl. ' , 

Florence 

Miss Caroline Latham is visiting 
her sister, Mrs. L. A. Conner, at 
Locust Grove. 

Miss Virginia Smith and Mr. Noel 
of Walton, Miss Ethel Souther and 
Mont Walton, of Pt. Pleasant were 
guests of Miss Stella Carpenter 
from Friday until Sunday. 
Bellevue 

Mrs. John Glore and Pearl Rice, 
who moved to Connersville, some- 
time ago, have moved back to Bel- 



levue. 

Miss Cordis Clore spent several 
days last week visiting on Clore's 
Ridge. 

Limaburg 

Master Lloyd Weaver has a very 
sore hand from a cut made by his 
air -rifle. 

Mr. Waters, near Limaburg, has 
sold his tobacco he raised on his 
home place and on Mr. Ed Farrell's 
land for 7 and 8 cents. He is to 
deliver it to Mr. Stevenson, of Er- 
langer. next week. 

Commissary 

Carl and Ralph Cason went to 
Richwood, Monday. Carl returned 
Wednesday with his sister Anna, 
who was visiting her sister, Mrs. 
Orin Phipps. 

Mrs. Josie Grant and Miss Maud 
Scott were callers at Mr. W. T. 
Ryle's, Thursday afternoon. 

Idlewild 

Owen Gaines and wife and James 
T. Grant and wife were guests at 
Thomas Whitaker's a few days 
since. 

E. M. and Milton Gaines were 
Sunday guests of C. E. Stephens 
and wife. 

Landing 

Rev. H. R. Mills and Dr. Simms 
took dinner with G. L. Miller and 
family after an able discourse by 
Rev. Simms, last Sunday. 

Mr. . and Mrs. George Moore, 
Misses Sallie and Pearl Hughes, 
Bob Hughes and Master Tom 
Hughes all of Beaver Lick, attend- 
ed church at Big Bone, the fifth 
Sunday. 

Walton 

John Kipp and. Raymond Byland 
were out from the city to see their 
parents, Sunday. 

There is a pair of fine twins 
down at Phil Stapleton's that is 
hard to beat. They weigh 19 
pounds. 

Gunpowder 

J. P. Utz and Mrs. Perry Bee- 
mon, of Limaburg, were guesCs of 
their sister, Mrs. Winnie Tanner, 
one day last week. 

Richwood 

George C. GOode, the Covington 
merchant, was the guest of Walter 
Grubbs, Thursday. . . 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope yon will eventual- 
ly shin to us. Why not 
SERVICE that SATISFIESnow? Reference: Ask 

the first man yon meet. 




giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii 
■ FULL CREDIT 



given on 



= ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES = 



I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 






5 Phone ERL. 87 Ambulance Service = 

illllilllillQllIlllllllllllllllilllilllllllllllllilllllllllllillllHIIIIIIHIIilllUIHIIIIIIIIIIll 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP & STITH 



FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 




LET IIS EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



0. J METZGER 



. 



OPTOMETRIST — 
63 1 Madison Ave* ( 



OPTICIAN 
tovington. K\ 



HUB 



THE BOONE COUNT! RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



• 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



UNION 



Mrs. Harvey Hicks spent Friday 
night in Ft. Thomas with her 
friend, ' Miss Catherine Brewer. 

Mrs. L; R. Barlow entertained 
with a delightful dinner Tuesday 
night complimenting the birthday 
anniversary of Mrs. Ralph E. Bar- 
low. Pvt. Barlow, now at Camp 




S 
1 



H 

■ 
N 




FOR BETTER 
HEALTH 

Periodic eye examination is 
essential for good health, 
proper vision and eye com- 
fort. Time changes your eyes, 
and as your eyes change your 
glasses should be changed, to 
preserve your eyes. 

How long has it been since 
your eyes were examined? 
Come in for a careful check- 
up of your eyes. Depend on 
our experience and equip- 
ment for better vision and 
genuine eye comfort. 






* m fT& x!T ' 1 



*>i«t a russcil I 



IOYW90 ro/7 



HXHXHXHXHXHZHZHSHXHZHXH 



H 

X 
H 

3 

X 



Wheeler, Ga., was much missed at 
this very pleasant affair. 

Mrs. Ells Hopperton, of Tampa, 
Fla., is with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Craddock. Mr. Hop- 
perton's work has called him to 
Knoxville, Tenn., where he will be 
located for sometime. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Huey left 
Thursday for Marfa, Texas, where 
they will spend two weeks with 
their son, Capt. J. M. Huey and 
Mrs. Huey. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Judge's sec- 
ond daughter, 2nd Lt. Ella Marie 
Judge, a graduate nurse of St. 
Elizabeth Hospital, Covington, is 
now stationed at Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison, Ind. 

Dinner guests Sunday of Mrs. B. 
L. Norman were Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie R. Barlow, Mrs. Harvey 
Hicks, Mrs, Ralph E. Barlow, Mrs. 
Tom Robert Huey, Miss Frances 
Barlow and Mrs. Malone Ligon. 

Communion Service will be ob- 
served at the, Presbyterian Church 
Sunday night, February 6th. Rev. 
Edwin Rock, Louisville, will be the 
guest speaker. 

Allen Judge, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
'Everett B. Judge, who has en- 
listed in the Marines, left Saturday 
to be inducted in the service. 

Mrs. Ralph Edward Barlow en- 
tertained her bridge club Thurs- 
day night at the L. R. Barlow res- 
idence. 

The first and second basketball 
teams from Florence tangled with 
New Haven's fives Frdiay night 
on the, home court. New Haven 
was victorious in both games. 



The Blood Stream 




N. TTJLCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at— 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



Mercer county farmers sold much 
of their livestock last fall because 
of the drouth and the food situ- 
ation. 



, 



To Taxpayers of Boone County 

THE LAST DAY TO PAY YOUR 1943 TAXES 
BEFORE THE PENALTY IS ADDED IS 

FEBRUARY 29, 1944 



J. T. WILLIAMS, Sheriff 

OF BOONE COUNTY 



The blood stream . has . several 
important functions. For instance 
it feeds the tissues from the pro- 
ducts of digestion; it carries away 
waste matter and it aids in equal- 
izing the temperature and the 
water content of the body. 

Blood is not just plain fluid, but 
has two parts. A yellowish fluid 
called PLASMA, in which float 
solid particules called corpuscles. 
Then there are three kinds of cor- 
puscles are the protectors of the 
body and multiply at a great rate 
of speed. In other words, the 
white corpuscles enable the body 
[ to resist infections and throw off 
contagious disease. , . 

Friends, now that we under- 

I stand how important a part our 

j blood stream plays in the health 

of our entire body, it is easy to see 

ithat we should be careful not to 

choke or cramp this blood stream 

in any way. 

When you cramp blood vessels 
and shut off blood supply to any 
part of the foot, every school 
physiology book tells us that you 
not only deprice it of the food it 
should have to keep healthy, but 
the slower blood stream cannot 
clear away waste matter as lt 
should. We find chemical deposits 
form at the joints of the feet and 
the legs and then inflamation de- 
velops leading to pain and discom- 
fort that makes you miserable all 
over. These symptoms are often 
mistaken for arthritis rheumatism 
or some other ailment. Backaches, 
headaches and many body ills 
may be traced to the feet.— AdT. 



It is said that tobacco stalks In 
i Ballard county, if properly used, 

| would be worth 40,000 to fanners as 

\ fertiliser. 



G 



AYETV 

THEATRE 1 



ERLANGER, ELSMERE, KY . 
FREE PARKING LOT 
SHOW TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:00 and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 p. m. 

Sunday 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p. m. 



TONIGHT 

FEBRUARY 3RD 

* * ^ ^ * * 

THE FIRST NG HUMAN * 
* SJOKT OP THE WARI + 




WtaBEMHX-RJckardCOffTEj 



Also Cartoon and Comedy 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

FEBRUARY 4 AND 5TH 



'WINTERTIME 



3 



Also Batman No. 11 and Cartoon 

SUNDAY and MONDAY 

FEBRUARY 6 AND 7TH 






PUBLIC 










Kl 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUC- 
TION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER AT THE FARM, BUL- 



LITTSVILLE, ON 






MONDAY, FEB. 7 

AT 10 :30 A.M. (CWT) . 

■ 
The following: 1 aged mule; 1 team horses, 7 years old, with 
harness; 1 cow, 6 years old; 1 Guernsey cow, 3 years old; 1 Red 
cow, 5 years old, freshen in May; 1 Red cow, 5 years old, fresh 
in March; 1 milking Shorthorn, 6 years old, with calf by side; 
1 Jersey cow, 4 years old; 1 Jersey cow, 4 years old, freshen in^ 
April; 1 Guernsey cow 8 years old, freshen in March; 1 Jersey 
cow 8 years old, freshen in March; 1 Jersey eow, 5 years old, to 
freshen in May; 2 heifers, fresh in spring; 2 Holstein heifers, 5 
months old; 1 Guernsey heifer, 1 year old; 2 shoats; 24 Leg- 
horn pullets; 18 mixed pullets; 12 Whiterock pullets; 1 McCor- 
mick Deering mowing machine; 1 iron wheel wagon with box 
bed; 1 spring wagon; 1 disc harrow; 1 riding cultivator; 1 A 
harrow; 1 hay rake; 1 turning plow; one 1-row corn drill, fert- 
ilizer attachment; 1 hillside turning plow; 1 laying off plow; 2 
double shovel plows; 4 milk cans; milk house equipment, all 
new; 5 tons Korean hay; 125 bushels corn; 1 set 30-ft extension < 
ladders; 1 Good Will range; 1 brooder stove; 1 coal heater; 1 
kerosene stove ; 1 kitchen cabinet; 1 piano; 1 living room suite; 
1 dresser; 1 dining table; 1 ice box; 1 electric radio, RCA Victor; 
1 wardrobe, and a lot of other articles too numerous to men- 
tion. 




wHh 
Him"*" ' ROBERT 

WARRICK • RYAN 

Produced by ROBERT FELLOWS 

Directed by RAY EN RIGHT 
.Sc reen Play bv A be «Jfjnd«l 

Also Disney Carton and News 




TUESDAY 

FEBRUARY 8TH 




iWtfftEM 
Bit LI Am n 

"THE LONE 
WMF 



with 

MMSAVME 

ERIC ELORE 

A Columbia 

ficlttf* 



ALSO 



STARRETT 



HOW ODT HELPS KEEP 

FARM TRUCKS ROLLING 

Almost all of the products raised 
by the Nation's seven million farm 
families, at some time between 
farm and consumer are transport- 
ed by motor truck, according to the 
Office of Defense Transportation, 
and rfearly all farm supplies are 
transported to farms by motor 
truck. , j. 

The ODT says, that more than 
one and one-half million trucks 
now are in such agricultural trans- 
portation service, and approxim- 
ately 1,050,000 of these trucks are 
owned and operated by farmers. 

To meet war-time farm trans- 
portation needs, the Division of 
Motor Transport of ODT develop- 
ed a program for the conservation 
and utilization of these farm ve- 
hicles and undertook to provide for 
orderly and continued movement 
of farm supplies to fare s. 

To assist in carrying s program 
directly to farmers, OD organized 
county farm transportation com- 
mittees in each of the-J,022 agri- 
cultural counties of tae United 
States. These committees lead in 
developing local progrigps to con- 
serve and utilize farm' vehicles-^- 
analyzing a farmer's operatidn 
and dovetailing his production and 
and marketing requirements « with 
available transportation. They 
help farmers complete applications 
for new trucks and assist ODT 
district officers in determining the 
certification necessary for certific- 
ates of war necessity without which 
no truck can legally operate. 

In reviewing applications for 
certificates of war necessity, one 
committee helped make it possible 
for the ODT district manager to 
revise original recommendations 
and thus effect a reduction of 1,- 
073,372 miles of travel and save 
125,000 gallons of gasoline. An- 
other district manager reviewed 
gasoline requests with his county 
farm transportation' committee 
and saved 435,733 gallcns of gas- 
oline — 39 percent of I le amount 
of the original requests 

MANY REPORTS OF #F 

TOBACOO; PROFITS 

Adam Kalb of Bracken county 
primed 13 acres of toba co twice to 
save 4,160 pounds, for v nich he re- 
ceived an average of 3 cents a 
pound. The approxin te cost of 
priming was $300. 

Many farmers in Bjjtill county 
report high prices forjtheir to- 
bacco crops. CharleagWinn, Jr., 
received an average of? $54.15 per 
hundred for 3,090 pjbunds. He 
grew root-rot resistant Ky. 16. 
Goble Goosey, who grew the same 
variety, harvested 1,326 pounds 
per acre, which sold for $54.79 per 
hundred. 

One of the highest tobacco yields 
in Rowan county was grown by 
Dewey Nickells, according to Farm 



mm 



TERMS— CASH 



LUNCH ON GROUNDS 



J. T. POWELL 

LUTE BRADFORD and CHAS DUNCAN, Auctioneers 



\4fcAfXWtf 

VrfA C OLUMBIA PI CTURE 



PMtXW 



WED., and THURSDAY 

FEBRUARY 9 AND 10TH 



fltf* 





"FLESH and FANTASY" 

starring in thm oroWr 
of fh»/r oppMranet 

ROBERT BENCHLEY 

BETTY FIELD 
ROBERT CUMMINOS 

.M EDOAR BARRIER 

EDWARD G. ROBINSON 

-* THOMAS MITCHELL 

C AUBREY SMITH 

ANNA III 

DAME MAY WHITTT 

CHARLES BOYER 
BARBARA STANWYCK 

•** CHARLES WINNINGS* 
Produced by CHARLES BOYBt 

end flJUEN DUVIVIER 
DirKUd b r JUUEN DUVIVTB 



Also Three Stooge Comedy 



For 'your convenience this 
Theater selis WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS — Stop at the 
box office. 



Agent Forrest S. Brame. On 1.1 
acres, Mr. Nickells grew 2,054 
pounds which sold for $53.65 per 
hundred. He applied 800 pounds 
of phosphate when he seeded 
vetch in the fall, of 1942, and the 
following spring he drilled 500 
pounds of 3-8-6 to the row. He 
used Ky. 41A tobacco. 

A few years ago, the farm of 
Hobert Morris in Owsley county 
produced 400 pounds of tobacco to 
the acre. In 1943, more* than 1,400 
pounds were produced on the same 
amount of ground. Two hundred 
and fifty-eight pounds were prim- 
ed, bringing almost $132. Mr. Mor- 
ris, who used a cover crop of vetch 
and rye, with an application of 
phosphate, 500 pounds of com- 
mercial fertilizer and some man- 
ure, is convinced that such prac- 
tices pay, according to Farm Agent 
H. M. Williams. 

Douglas Hall of Trigg county 
produced tobacco weighing 12 
ounces to the plant, or 2,100 pounds 
to the acre. He used fertilizer lib- 
erally. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



Some of the Haldeman 4-H club 
members in Rowen county, made 
Christmas money by making and 
selling Christmas wreathes. 




with WAR BONDS 



Your 

Eyes 






and your children's eyes de- 
serve my expert (service. See 
me for better vision and real 
eye comfort. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 



PUBLIC 




As administrator of the estate of Katherine 
Geisler, deceased, I will offer at Public Auc- 
tion at the property in Petersburg, Ky., on 

SAT., FEB. 12 

At 12:00 (CWT) 

The following: Household and kitchen furni- 
ture, some antiques; a few carpenter tools, and 
many other articles too numerous to mention. 






TERMS— CASH 



L. S. CHAMBERS, Admr. 

COL. GEORGE RISER, Auctioneer. 



.. ( 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT .AUCTION Ol 
THE EAST BEND ROAD, FOUR MILES SOUTH OF BUI 
LINGTON, on 

HURSDAY, FEB. 



i 



, 



AT 12:00 (CWT) 
FARMING IMPLEMENTS— McCormick mowing machine, hay 
rake, haf bed, wagon, sled, disc harrow, smoothing harrow, hill- 
side plo%, two-horse jumper, Oliver breaking plow, single shovel 
plow, 4 Rouble shovel plows, 5-shovel cultivator, 14-tooth culti- 
vator, r Sing cultivator good as new, road scraper, fencing ma- 
chine a d wire stretcher, jack screw, pitchforks, hoes, shovels, 
rock homers, crosscut saw, 2 sets of leather work harness, 
axes, stfclyards, wheelbarrow, plow harness, 2 new horse collars, 
check ltfies, crowbar, hog killing outfit complete, 2 lard kettles, 
lard pref s and sausage mill, 3 milk cans, buckets, 1 milk separ- 
ator, 12 it. log chain, and various other small tools. 
Four or 5 tons of alfalfa hay. Model A Ford Sedan, good rubber 

LIVESTOCK— 1 black mare, ten years old, 1300 lbs; one 3*year- 
old bay mare, weigh 1250 lbs; 5 milch cows, Shorthorn, one with 
calf by her side, 3 to freshen within 30 days, one in May. 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS— Cole Hot Blast heater; wood heater; 
two bedsteads; one bureau; washstand; two small tables; 3 
kitchen tables; set bed springs, practically new; chairs; wash- 
ing machine; wash bench with wringer, good condition; 1 cedar 
hand ch rn; 1 side-icer ice-box; 2 good mattresses; 1 Bissell 
carpet s eeper; 1 table-style Aladdin lamp with parchment 
shade ; 2 >ld glass lamps ; stone jars, various sizes ; pans and iron 
pots; lot 6f Mason fruit jars with caps; odd lot of dishes, isome 
antiquesjjother articles too numerous to mention. 

P TERMS— CASH 






CH 



KELLY 



COL. W0RTHINGT0N & COL LUTE BRADFORD, Aucts. LUCIAN BRADFORD, Clerk 



T 



r 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






GASBURG 



Mrs. John B. Walton spent Fri- 
day afternoon with Mrs. Nat Rog- 
ers. 

Mrs. John Aylor returned the 
latter part of this week from Cov- 
ington, where she had been at the 
bedside of her grandson, Jimmy, 
the small son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Scott Jones. 

Mrs. Howard Huey has as her 
guest her granddaughter, Miss 
Joyce Fagan, of near Beaver. 

Mrs. John Klopp and daughter, 



Miss Gladys spent Wednesday aft- 
ernoon with Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
Mrs. Wilson Leek. 

Sorry to report that Mrs. Charles 
White is not improving very rapid- 
ly, j 

Mrs. Nat Rogers suffered injuries 
when she feU at her home last 
week. Her injuries were not ser- 
ious. 

Wilson Leek and daughter Miss 
Wanda Gail were business visitors 
in Burlington one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
daughter spent Friday evening 



S«»l»M*M*ll*IIXMXIIXI«II*MW«il«M«l«l«IWH«NWW««H«««« M « ,, 5 

JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY j 

DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES J 

s DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS j 

5 | 

Order your implement repairs early — John < j 
Deere, Vulcan, Oliver. 

Bring in your sheep-shearing combs and 
cutters to be sharpened. 



I The Jansen Hardware Co. | 

j CO. W10 108-110 PIKE ST. COVINGTON, KY. 

S«HXHaHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHrMXHXHXHXHaHIHXHXHXMSHa!HXH5 



V 



NOTICE! 



The 1944 dog licenses are now due and every dog 
in Boone County must have a license. The Boone 
County Fiscal Court has instructed the Sheriff 
to collect all dog licenses at once, due to the fact 
that the Live Stock Fund is more than one year 
behind in paying the claims for sheep that were 
killed by dogs. Please obtain this license at 
once so that you will not have to pay the penalty. 

J. T. WILLIAMS 

SHERIFF OF BOONE COUNTY, KENTUCKY 



with Mrs. Cord Cox and son Willie 
and her house guests, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. O. Rector and daughter. 

Mr. Ott Rogers is suffering with 
rheumatism. 

Ott Rogers is suffering with 
rheumatism. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor, of 
Cincinnati, spent Tuesday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Rogers. 
John Aylor butchered Saturday. 
Webb Rogers is on the sick list. 
Mrs. E. E. Klopp and son and 
Mrs. Wilson Leek and daughters 
were shopping in Aurora, Saturday 
afternoon. . . 

Frank Biddle called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Andy Cook, Saturday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, of near 
Hebron spent Saturday with Mr. 
and Mrs. John Aylor and assisted 
them in butchering. 

Mrs. Susie Koons spent Saturday 
afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. Tom 
Abdon and family. 

Embry Klopp and Wilson Leek 
were hauling hay from Indiana, 
Saturday. j 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector and 
daughter moved to their home in 
Petersburg this week. 

Gasburg news will continue the 
same as it has for the past fifteen 
years Anyone having items can 
still give them to the same corres- 
pondent that you have had in the 

past. 

Mrs. W. O. Rector had the mis- 
fortune to. fracture some ribs last 
week. 

Miss Gladys Klopp has been so- 
liciting for the 4th Bond Drive. 
She has been quite successful so 

Mr. and Mrs. John Maurer call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Andy Cook 
and family, Sunday afternoon. 

Misses Lois Jean and Wanda 
Leek and Don Ray Klopp called on 
their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl Leek, Sunday. 

E. E. Klopp sold his truck to Mr. 
York, of Indiana. 

Mrs. Lydia Abdon and family 
spent Sunday with ' relatives in 

Ohio. „ , 

Carroll Lee Eggleston called on 
his sister, Mrs. Wilson Leek and 
Mr. Leek, Sunday afternoon. 



PETERSBURG 



Rollie Hume 



Chester Tarter of Russell coun- 
ty received $3,008 for 5,782 pounds 
of tobacco on 22 acres. 



Notice Of Bids 



Notice is hereby given that bids 
will be received by the Board of 
the Hopeful Lutheran Church for 
a Sexton for the Hopeful Lutheran 
Cemetery for the year 1944. 

Bids must be in the hands of H. 
J. Kelly, not later than February 

12 1944. 

The Council reserves the r.ght to 
reject any and all bids. 

HOPEFUL LUTHERAN COUNCIL. 



Chas. Moore and Mrs. Mae 
Snyder left Wednesday for Pt. 
Pleasant, W. Va., to visit her son 
Wilbur Snyder and family. 

Mrs. Raymond Gross called on 
Mrs. L. S. Chambers on Thursday 
afternoon. 

Claude Edwards returned Tues- 
day from North Carolina, where he 
visited his son Wilson, who is a 
patient in the hospital there. He 
reports Wilson as doing nicely and 
will be moved to a hospital at In- 
dianapolis in about two weeks. 

Miss Edna Berkshire spent Wed- 
nesday in Lawrenceburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eggleston 
are the proud parents of a baby 
girl, born January 26. 

James Feeley has been suffering 
with an infected thumb for the 
past few weeks. 

Wilbur Rice built a new chim- 
ney in the house owned by Mrs. 
Flora Mae Barnette, which was 
damaged by fire recently. 

Mrs. Oliver Geisler, of Cleveland 
and Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Prichard 
were in town Friday. ■» 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Chambers 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rog- 
ers Jr., on Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. B. H. Berkshire called on 
Mr. and Mrs. "Podge" Alloway, 
Mrs. J. M. Thompson and Mrs. 
Theresa McWethy on Wednesday 
afternoon. 

"Podge" Alloway has been con- 
fined at home, on account of ill- 
ness, the past week. 

Rev. Helton and son Billys of 
Hebron were in town Thursday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holbert Rue and 
son and Miss Gertrude Randall 
spent Sunday with her mother, 
Mrs. Olga Randall. In the after- 
noon Mrs. Rue called on friends in 
town. 

James Feeley moved to the Dar- 
by property on Saturday and W. O. 
Rector to the Kelly proper :y which 
he purchased recently and which 
was vacated by Mr. Feeley. 

Miss Ermal Rector spent the past 
two weeks with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cleve Rector. 

L. S. Chambers has .been ill for 
several days with a severe cold. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Keim attended 
the funeral of her nephew Edward 
Hauck, of Cincinnati, O., January 
10th and was called back to at- 
tend the funeral of her sister-in- 
law, Mrs. Caroline Keim Hauck, of 
Cincinnati, O., Jan. 26th. 

Mrs. Clifford Ryle, of Wilming- 
ton, Ind., and Cpl. Robert A. Ryle, 
of Orlanda, Fla., and Mrs. Lulu 
Stephens were dinner guests of 
Miss Emma Aylor and mother last 
Tuesday. 

Sorry to report Mrs. John Brad- 
burn as being quite ill. 



Funeral services for Rollie Hume 
will be held today at 2 o'clock at 
his residence near Nicholson. 
Chambers and Grubbs, Walton fu- 
neral directors are in charge of ar- 
rangements. Burial will be in In- 
dependence Cemetery. 

Mr. Hume, 72, died Tuesday at 
Booth Memorial Hospital, Coving- 
ton, after a long illness. He had 
been active in Democratic politic- 
al circles for many years. 

His widow, Mrs. 'vanora Watson 
Hume, two sons, j hilip R. Hume, 
and Robert Hur , Agricultural 
Agent for Grant ounty; and a 
sister, Mrs. George ^rown, Indian- 
apolis survive himjf 




POINT PJjEASANT 

Mr. and Mrs. J$S. Kenton and 
family visited relafoyes in Coving- 
ton, Saturday evening. 

Miss Mollie Kenton and Miss 
Milrose Kenton vtere week-end 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Ken- 
ton and son, Stanles. 

Melvin Beil, of Burlington call- 
ed on Adam Wernz> Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Wernz at- 
tended a party Saturday night at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donel 
Baker and son, of .udlow. 



NOTICE ! 

f, 

DEALERS AND ROt>MING HOUSE 

OWNERS 

20,000 PIECES OF 

CHINAWARE AND* .GLASSWARE 

AS LOW AS 2 for 5c 

Enamelware, potis and pans. 
Sold below factory cost. . 

SAVINGS UP TO 50 
PAT'S CHIN. . STORE 

736 MADISON M COVINGTON 




EBRUARY 




EXCELLENT VALUES 



COPPIN'S 

Madison at 7th - Covington, Ky. 



■ 



- 




Quick Dry Enamel ,'. $1.98 Gal. 

Guaranteed House Paint $1.69 Gal. 

Red Roof Paint $1.49 Gal. 

Aluminum Paint ..,....$4.95 Gal. 

Black Roof Coating . ,.,.49c Gal. 

In 5-Gallor Kits 

Kemtone ,. . .$2.98 Gal. 

GORDON SUPPLY GO. 



USED CAR BARGAINS i 

1937*FORD COACH \ $325 - 

1941 FORD DELUXE all extras, 18,00<* mi. $1075 

1937 FORD COACH J $295 

1937 DeSOTO SEDAN L $375 

1940 DeSOTO SEDAN, 7-passenger $1250 

1937 DODGE COACH $350 

1937 OLDSMOBILE COACH $375 

1937 (TWO) STUDEBAKER COUPES $350 

1936 CADILLAC $325 



... 



.$695 
.$295 
.$695 



X~1 



M 



AUCTION 

In order to settle the estate of the late Albert Shields, I will sell 
at Public Auction/at the Albert Shields farm, located 4 miles 
southwest of Union on the Big Bone Church road, on 

h ' J '"' ' 

Sat, feb. 5th 

AT 10:00 A.M. 
- I- 
The following: Eight milch cows, one to be fresh in February, 
one in March, 3 in May, 1 in June and 2 in September; one year- 
ling heifer; one team of work horses, will work anywhere; one 
work mule; 2 road wagons; 1 disc harrow; 1 Vulcan breaking 
plow; one 2-horse sled; 1 hay rake; 1 three-shovel plow; 1 single 
shovel plow; 1 two-horse tobacco setter; one scalding box; 4 sets 
of work harness; collars, bridles, check lines; 1 vise; chains; 
hoes; forks; posthole digger; 1 ten-gallon milk can; 1 cream 
separator; one milk can washer; small tools; one Oliver break- 
ing plow ; and some household goods. 

■ 

TERMS MADE KNOWN ON DAY OF SALE 
LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS 

Beckham Shields, Admr. 

COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



736 MADISON 



COVINGTON I 



1939 HUDSON 4-DOOR 

1937 CHRYSLER SEDAN 

1939 DODGE 4-DOOR SEDAN 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN $245 

1938 WILLYS SEDAN ........$325 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff call- 
ed on his parents, Sunday after- 
noon. 

We are glad to report Mrs. Tom 
Hamilton and little grandson Tom- 
my Ryle are better at this writing. 

Brother Hogan, pastor of Big 
Bone Baptist Church called on the 
Shinkle family, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sebree were 
in Covington, Saturday. 

Walton Rogers was horhe for a 
brief furlough last week., 

Mrs. Schwenke and Alma call- 
ed on Mrs. Sebree, Thursday aft- 
ernoon. 

Brother Hogan spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with the Sebree 
family and Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Kirtley and daughter took supper 
with them on Saturday evening. 

Bro. Hogan delivered a splendid 
j sermon both morning and evening 
' to a large audience, Sunday. 

iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHuiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 

New James 

Theatre 

Beginning Sept. 25th One Show 

Each and Every Night at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

War Time 

BARGAIN NIGHTS MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



TOMORROWS HEADLINES 



>/r> 



££COR; 



Warner Baxter, Margaret Lindsay 

"CRIME DOCTOR" 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD 



Gene Tierney, Don Ameche and 
Charles Coburn, in 

HEAVEN CAN WAITS 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 4 AND 5 



Red Skelton, Eleanor Powell, in 

I 0000 IT 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH 



Claire Trevor, in 

GOOD LUCK 

MR. YATES 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7TH 



George Montgomery, Annabella, 
with Kent Taylor in 

BOMBER'S MOON 

TUES. & WED., FEBRUARY 8 & 9 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 






Tojo O 










s 



This sticker in your win- 
dow shows you bought 
extra War Bonds. It's your 
battle flag here at borne. 



WAR BON 

Sore — we'd a!l like to see headlines like these. Bat just 
waiting and hoping won't make them come true. 

The plain truth is that while we now hold the initia 
tive in this war, we have yet to penetrate beyond the 
outer perimeter of Axis defenses. We still have a long, 
hard road to go... a road that will be longer and 
harder if there is any let-down now. 

That's why you're being asked to buy extra War Bonds 
during this Fourth War Loan. To keep our fighting 
men supplied with the weapons they need to win ... at 
a minimum cost of blood and Kves. 

Remember — war eats up munitions at an incredible 
rate. The bonds you bought last year won't win today's 
battles. So buy at least one extra $100 bond now . . . and 
keep on buying bonds until Victory. 










i 



rr 



•Je&4* BACK THE ATTACK! 

This Advertisement Sponsored by 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 




i . 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 







• 


• 










■ 


,' 




• 




■ 



THURSDAY, 



RUARY 3, 1944 



Seen And Heard Around 

a 
=3 

The County Seat 1 

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

' Miss Mildred Siekman, teacher in 
the. local school has been 111 for the 
past several days. 



Sam Blackburn, of Burlington 
has been ill for the past few days. 
4 ■ I ( 

Earl Lock returned home last 
Thursday, after a visit with rela- 
tives in Ohio and West Virginia. 



Mr. and Mrs. Noel WaMfon were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. 
C. Carroll, of Big Bone. 



I O. H. Garrison, of Union was a 
business visitor at this office Fri- 
day morning. 



Mr. and Mrs. Shelby Cowen, of 
Cincinnati spent last Sunday with 
relatives here. . 



Bobby Brown, H. R. Forkner, Jr., 
Joe Smith and,JJjgmie Easton all 
have the mumps. 



Mr. and Mrs. Albert Sebree and 
son moved last week into the home 
of Mrs. Nannie Riddell. 



Mrs. Albert Pettit left last week 
for St. Augustine, Fla., to visit her 
niece. . . 



Miss Dorothy Aylor, of Florence, 
spent the week-end with Miss Mary 
Bess Jarrell. 



Mrs. Lillie Youell, of Hebron is 
spending several days with Mrs. 
Ida Balsly. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ryle and Mrs. 
Bess Rouse spent, last Friday in 
Cincinriati, shopping. 



NOW k • . 

The nearest things to 

naturally curley hair 

COLD WAVE PERMANENT 

Senational No-Heat Method 

of Permanent $<fl ^V°® 

Waving A W 

Other Permanents $4.00 up 



L 



AROS 

BEAUTY SALON 



E 



400. Dixie H'way, Erlanger, Ky. 

Phone Erl. 6252 
Edith Amburgey, Prop. 



Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Combs 
and son were guests of relatives in 
Jonesville over the week-end. 



Albert Feldhaus of East Bend 
neighborhood is seriously 111 at 
Christ Hospital, suffering from ne- 
phritis, following an attack of flu. 



Mrs. Charles Benson and baby 
daughter returned from St. Eliza- 
beth Hospital to the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. D. Benson, Monday. 



Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Rouse and 
son and Rev. Thomas were Sunday 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Hu- 
bert Rouse. 



Miss Betty Horton, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Horton un- 
derwent a tonsilectomy at Christ 
Hospital ,one day last week. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Easton and 
and family and C. T. Easton were 
Saturday evening guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Omer Easton, near Devon. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Jarrell and 
daughter Lynette, of Walton call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Frank Maurer, 
Sunday afternoon. 



W. C. Johnson, of Beaver Lick 
was a visitor here Saturday morn- 
ing. Mr. Johnson stated that he 
was 90 years of age that day; He 
has been a subscriber of The Re- 
corder since it was founded. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Jockey, of 
Walton spent last Saturday aft- 
ernoon with Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Kirkpatrick. 



Sgt. Ralph Maurer, of Texas, was 
called home last week, due to an 
operation performed on his wife at 
Bethesda Hospital. 



Roy Bennett, of Ludlow was a 
guest Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. 
Newton Sullivan and daughter, 
Nancy. 



Mrs. A. B. Sullivan of Petersburg 
spent last Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Newton Sullivan and daugh 
ter. 



Miss Mildred Lizer, student nurse 
at Christ Hospital, Cincinnati spent 
the week-end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lizer. 



Tom Hamilton, of Beaver spent 
Thursday in Burlington. While here 
he called at The Recorder office, 
having his subscription moved up. 



Six members of the Elsmere Fire 
Department were in Burlington 
Sunday afternoon to inspect, pro 
gress of the Burlington Fire De- 
partment. 



S)XHXHSHXHXHXH3EHXNXHKHXNXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHKNXHIHSHXMXHX£ 

H 

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X 



H 



£0 
S 

■ 

s 

1 
s 

a 
s 
i 
a 

1 

3 



H 

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K 

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X 
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.-. WAR BONDS /. 

Make that subscription to the Fourth War Bond 
Drive as soon as possible. 

The soldiers who are protecting Us need your sup- 
port and Uncle Sam is generous enough to pay you Jj 
interest for your money and pay back the princip 
al at maturity. 

You can not afford not to subscribe to the limit. 



Peoples Deposit Bank 






BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 1 

IftXHXHaNSHXHXHSHXHSHXHXHXHXHXHXHSHXHXHXIIXHXHXHXHSHXHSK 



the Home Store 

IIIIIIIIIIIIILilllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle. .. .ea. 6c 

PTZ POWDER 1 lb. $1.60 

PTZ POWDER '. 5 lb. 7.50 

VANILLA WAFER COOKIES pound 25c 

GINGER SNAPS pound 15c 

FIG BARS pound 25c 

DEVIL DELIGHT pound 27c 

NUT CREME t.i\ pound 35c 

ZESTA CRACKERS ; , . . .pound 18c 

SALTINE CRACKERS .pound 18c 

KRISPIE CRACKERS pound 18c 

HONEY GRAHAM CRACKERS v ..f pound 19c 

STAFFORD'S ORIGINAL LONG LEAF GOLDEN 

BURLEY TOBACCO SEED, i/ 2 oz. 75o 1 oz. $1.50 

WARNER'S LARGE LEAF GOLDEN BURLEY 

TOBACCO SEED, y 2 oz. 75c ".1 oz $1.50 

YELLOW STEM TWIST BUD TOBACCO SEED, y 2 oz 75c; 1 oz 1.50 
BELL'S WHITE BURLEY TOBACCO SEED, % oz. 75c; 1 oz. 1.50 
Our plantbed fertilizer and grass seed will arrive about February 
1. See us for your spring requirements. 
i ' - 

KRAUT, 32 oz. can, no points each 20c 

PINEAPPLE, No. ZVi can, 36 points each 28c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2 can, 30 points each 25c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 qt., 14 oz. no points each 35c 

TOMATO JUICE, 46 oz., 6 points.. i each 25c 

PLUMS, No. 2V 2 can, 15 points .each 20c 

PEACHES, No. VA can 27 points. . : each 27c 

PEANUT BUTTER, pt. size each 35c 



Those who are planning to at- 
tend the Blood Bank in Cincin- 
nati, Friday of this week are urged 
to be at the courthouse by one 
o'clock, at which place transport- 
ation will be provided. 



Tire Rationing Is 

Drastically Cut 



Mr. and Mrs. Kirtley Cropper* 
and family and Mr. and Mrs. Walt- 
er Brown and family were dinner 
guests Saturday evening of Judge 
and Mrs. C. L. Cropper and daugh- 
ter. 



Mrs. Dorothy Ryle, of Cincin- 
nati spent last Sunday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Mc- 
Mullen, of the East Bend Road. 
Mrs. Ryle returned recently from 
Little Creek, Va., after spending a 
few days with her husband who 
is stationed there with he U. S. 
Navy. 

! t 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Smith and 
family entertained a group of 
friends at dinner last Thursday 
evening. Guests were Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Maurer and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Rudicill, Mr. and 
Mrs. Roscoe Akin and daughter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Combs and 
son and Mrs. William Townsend 
and son. 

D. H. Norris and family had as 
dinner guests Sunday, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Cason and daughter 
Betty and son Ivan, Mr. and«Mrs. 
A. G. McMullen and Pauline Norris 
of Cincinnati. 



Under a drastic change in tire 
rationing regulations announced 
Saturday by OPA, eligibility of a 
motorist for new passenger car 
tires will be based on the "pur- 
pose" for which he drives rather 
than the kind of gasoline ration 
he has. 

The OPA office for Boone County 
was informed that the new regu- 
lations became effective Tuesday, 
February 1. It gave rationing 
boards authority to decide who are 
the "most essential drivers." 

Scarcity of used and reclaimed 
rubber tires has "grounded" many 
essential A and B drivers, OPA of- 
ficials explained. The amendment 
will make certain that the increas- 
ing number of new tires which will 
become available this year will get 
into the right hands. > 

The new program divides motor- 
ists into thre categories: One, high- 
ly essential occupational drivers; 
two, , less essential occupational 
drivers, and three, non-essential 
drivers. 



HAMILTON 



Reuben Kirtley has been hauling 
lumber and outbuildings from the 
place he purchased at Hamilton, 
to his farm in East Bend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Lovelace 
were week-end guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Claude Black. 

James Huff bought a team of 
horses from Harry Trapp last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff call- 
ed on his parents, Sunday. 

The W. M. S. of Big Bone Bap- 
tist Church will serve lunch at 
Shield's sale, Saturday. All mem- 
bers asked to bring two pies. 

Robert Johnson of Aurora, call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hyff, Sat- 
urday, j , $ 

Mrs. Huey Ryle spent Wednes- 
and Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Tom Hamilton and Mr. and Mrs. 
Eldon Ryle. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff 
called Tuesday evening, i 

Mrs. Anna Huff and son were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Claude 
Black Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldon Ryle and 
baby, of Burlington spent several 
days with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Hamilton the past week 



Mrs. Hamilton and grandson were 
ill and under the doctor's care the 
past week, but are improved at this 
writing. t 

Conner Carroll took ,Lewis Ryle, 
Charlie Allphin, John and Harry 
Huff's tobacco to Carr^llton, Wed- 
nesday. | ' 

Mrs. Bertha Huff spent Thursday 
with Misses Emma Glore and 
Adelia Finnell. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson, of 
Aurora, Ind., »are the proud par- 
ents of a baby son, who arrived at 
Good Samaritan Hospital, Friday, 
January 28. 



1 1 1 f 1 1 if 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 ill l II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 il ll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 




HALLMARK 



VALENTINE GREETING CARDS 

STATIONERY - OFFICE SUPPLIES 

AUTOGRAPHIC REGISTER SUPPLIES 

STEWART - CARR 



505 Madison Avenue 



Covington 



47-IN. 12-IN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD FENCE rod 55c 

26-IN. MED. WEIGHT 6-IN. STAY rod 50c 

4-FT. POULTRY FENCE rod 60c 

4-POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll. . ;....... $4.50 



100 LBS. 24% DAIRY $3.15 

100 LBS. 16% DAIRY $2.90 

100 LBS. SHELLED CORN $2.90 

100 LBS. GROUND WHEAT., $2.90 



WOOD HEATING STOVES $5.50 to $10.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3-room size $45.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4 -room size , $60.00 



. 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillli: 

' WASHERS REPAIRED I 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE | 

MAYTAG OIL E 

WM. HAGEDORN 

| 856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. f 

=iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiF 




GULLEY & PETTiT I GEO. C. GOODE 

^ w ^ ^ ^ ■ ^ ■ ■ ■ oq PTIf I? CT 99W 7TTT S 




GOODE'S 



Tobacco 



Worthington's Ky. Experiment Station Certified 
No. 41A and No. 16 White Burley. Root-Rot 

Resistant. 

; 

Chancellor and Duncan's Ky. Experiment Sta- 
tion certified new improved Big White Burley 
No. 16. Root-Rot Resistant. 

Casey's Crossed Tobacco Seed Type No. 1 and 
Twist Bud. Guaranteed to grow. 

- 

Warner's Golden Burley, Improved White Bur- 
ley. Recleaned and tested at Ky. Experiment 
Station. 

Judy's Pride— The Old Reliable. 



about the WAC 



Want to know how the new 
WAC recruiting policies apply 
to .you? 

Want to know whether you're 
qualified for a special kind of 
Army job — whether you'd serve 
with the Air, Ground, or Ser- 
vice Forces— -whether you could 
he assigned to the part of the 
country in which you enlist? 

TODAY— get full details at 
the nearest U. S. Army Recruit- 
ing Station (your local post 
office will give you the ad- 
dress). Or write to: The Ad- 
jutant General, Room 4415, 
Munitions Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

iHiiiiHUHimuiumuumitmiHittitiHmi 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Secure all allowable deductions. Uncle Sam 
wants you only to pay your correct tax. The 
use of the proper form may save you a substan- 
tial sum of money. My service is your protec- 
tion. 

By my method, you do not have to stand in 
a long waiting line. 






REASONABLE FEE 
BRING 1942 AND 1943 TOTALS 



. 



Offices: Burlington Grand Jury Room Thurs- 
day Evenings and Saturday. Constance 
Other Evenings 

V. LENTS 



- i 




GUITARS 

$9.95 jp 

USED TE 
BANJ 

$12.00 

ROY ACUFF AND OTHER 
GUITAR, CORD AND IN- 
INSTRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE \MUSICAL 

WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 

HANSER JEWELRY & 
MUSIC COMPANY. 

515V& Madison Ave. 
Covington, -:- Kentucky 



BE WISE - - BUY NOW 

Drastic reductions in every department; all fall 
and winter merchandise must clear regardless of 
former price. 



■ / 



BUY BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 



You get more for your money when you buy 
"Star Brand," "Poll Parrot," and "Endicott John- 
son" shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 
prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. 



BUY WAR BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality" — Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 






HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC 
AUCTIO ^ TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, AT THE FARM LO- 
CATED MILE EAST OF HEBRON, KY., ON STATti ROAE> 
20, ON 



J 



AT 1:00 P. M. (CWT) 






PRICE OF ALL SEED: 



1/2 OZ. $75c 



1 OZ. $1.50 



23 PIKE ST. 22 W. 7TH ST. 

COVINGTON, KY. 



The following: 1 fresh Jersey cow, with 5 weeks old calf; 1 Jer 
sey cow, freshen in May; 1 aged mare; lot of chickens; Sharp- 
less cream separator; 3 ten-gallon milk cans; sanitary washing 
tub; electric water heater; 3 tons clover hay; some mixed hay; 
Fordson tractor and plows ; road wagon and box bed ; hay rake ; 
sled; breaking plow; potato plow; 2 single shovel plows; double 
shovel pk w; 1-horse cultivator; 1 -horse corn drill; 2 smoothing 
harrows ;, isc harrow; cutoff saw; 2 crosscut saws; grindstone; 
lot of seco -id-hand lumber; flour barrels; 8 dOz. bushel baskets; 
berry cratls; 5 heating stoves; porch swing; gas tank and faucet; 
lot of smapl tools; lot of household and kitchen furniture; lot 
of other articles too numerous to mention. 

I 






* ? 



TERMS— CASH 



Wm,, G. Wahl, Owner 



EDGAR GOODHfrDGE, Auctioneer 



JOHN CONNER, Clerk 



-J 



w 



i 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



1 ' 



%Js 



i ,• 



Town And Fa rm In Wartime 

- Ration Reminders 

Gasoline — In 17 east coast states 
A-8 coupons are good through 
February 8, and A-9 coupons be- 
come good February 9 and remain 
good through May 8. In states 
outside the east coast area A-10 
coupons are good through March 

21. 

Tire Inspection — For A coupon 
holders, deadline is March 31. For 
B and C coupon holders, deadline 
is February 28. 

Sugar — Stamp No. 30 in book! 
four is good for five pounds thru 
March 31. Stamp No. 40 in book 
four is good for five pounds of 
canning sugar through February 
28, 1945. 

Shoes— Stamp No. 18 in book one 




Your Valentine Photo 



Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far 
away front— send your smil- 
ing Valentine Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. 

Service Photo Studio 

804 MADISON,. COVINGTON 

Studio Hours: 11 a. m. to 

9 p. m. daily. Sundays 1 to 

5 p. m. 



is good for one pair. Stamp No. 1 
on the Airplane sheet in book 
three is good for one pair. 

Fuel Oil — Period 2 coupons are 
good throu :h February 7 in all 
areas exce^ i the South. Period 
3 coupons, now valid in the Middle 
West, East, JFar West, and South, 
remain goo$ through. March 13 in 
the Middle West, East and Far 
West, and through February 21 in 
the South. Periods 4 and 5 coup- 
ons, now v*$Ld in the South, re- 
main good through September 30. 

Meats, Fats — Brown stamps V 
and W good through February 26. 

Processed Foods — Green stamps, 
G, H, and J in book four are good 
through F bruary 20. Green 
stamps K, \ and M are good thru 
March 20. ?i 

Income Ttk — Deadline for filing 
returns, March 15, earlier filing is 
desirable. 

To Determine Tax You Owe 

As soon as wage earners get their 
wage and t x receipts from em- 
ployers th< t should make out 
their annual income and victory 
tax returns^ to determine how 
much if any tax they must pay 
by March 15", the deadline for fil- 
ing, the Treasury Department ad- 
vises. Some^wage earners will owe 
a substantia? amount, many will 
owe a small 'igure and others will 
get refunds. 

Sets Maximum Vegetable Prices 

To preventl sharp increases in 
fresh vegetable prices, the' Office 
of Price Administration has an- 
nounced maximum prices for car- 
rots, spinach peas, snap beans, 
eggplant, pej jers, and cucumbers. 
The action, v infective at the coun- 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 

Features Shoppers' 

Lunch 

j 

A special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 25c 
should be of special interest 
to Boone County shoppers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE 



-'llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIli 

NO PRIORITIES 

| Are Needed For Farm Tools | 
I I To Be Welded | 

I R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY I 

| 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 

nimmiiiiiiiiimimiimiiimiimimimimmimmmimmiimmmiimiiimmimiir- 



try shipper level, January 31, will 
become effective 15 days later at 
wholesale markets. Exact retail 
prices in each community will be 
announced by the regional and 
district OPA offices. 

Canning Sugar Now Available 

Housewives may now get five 
pounds of canning sugar by using 
stamp No. 40 in ration book four, 
OPA has announced, and addi- 
tional canning sugar later will be 
available on application to local 
boards. Stamp No. 40 will be good 
13 months through February 28, 
1945. 

Farm Support Price Program 

Average prices to egg producers 
ranging from a low of about 30 
cents a dozen during the spring 
to a high of about 40 cerrts a 
dozen in late fall or early winter 
are planned by the War Food Ad- 
ministration in its price support 
program for carlot graded eggs for 
1944. WFA also announced its 
proposal for support prices on 
other farm productions, subject to 
congressional action. 

May Tighten Farm Deferment 

To maintain their deferments 
from military service because of 
their agricultural activity, the 1,- 
700,000 registrants engaged, in ag- 
riculture may be asked to increase 
their production goals, according 
to Commander Patrick H. Winston, 
assistant executive selective ser- 
vice system. Approximately one 
million of these deferred men are 
non-fathers. 
To Relocate Physicians, Dentists 

Any municipality, county, or 
other local subdivision of govern- 
ment suffering from an acute 
shortage of physicians or dentists 
may now apply to the Surgeon 
General or the district office of 
the U. S. Public Health Service or 
through the State Health Officer 
requesting the relocation of a 
physician or dentist. The Public 
Health Service agrees to pay mov- 
ing costs and to pay the relocat- 
ed doctor $250 a month for the 
first' three months. The doctor 
agrees to practice in the commu- 
nity for not less than one year, 
and the community agrees to con- 
tribute one-fourth the govern- 
ment's cost to the Public Health 
Service. 

Help For Truck Owners 

Owners of farm trucks and other 
truck operators are requested by 
the 'Office of Defense Transport- 
ation to cooperate in a reporting 
system which the ODT has estab- 
lished to help truck and bus oper- 
ators with their tire-procurement 
problems. Any operator eligible 
for tires but unable to obtain a tire 
certificate from his local ration- 
ing board because of exhausted 
quotas or other reasons, is asked 
to report that fact to his ODT 
district office, stating the reason 
given by the board for the denial 
of the certificate. This inform- 



ation will enable the ODT to deter- 
mine the kind of action to be 
taken, if assistance is warranted. 
Ration-Free Rubber Footwear 
OPA will permit some ration-free 
sales of rubber footwear by re- 
tailers and jobbers who have ex- 
cess and slow-moving stocks that 
otherwise might be wasted thru 
deterioration. Retailers and job- 
bers desiring permission for such 
sales must apply in writbg to OPA 
district offices. A minimum of 15 
days will be required between fil- 
ing of application and granting 
of '.'non-rationed" stickers, which 
identify the released footwear. 
Round-Up 
U. S. civilians will get 63 per 
cent of the vitamin A allocation 
in 1944, WFA says, as the army 
gets most of its vitamins thru a 
balanced diet . . . Burn any pack- 
ing material that comes with gifts 
from soldiers abroad to avoid in- 
sect pests and plant disease, ad 
vises the Department of Agricul- 
ture. The department also advises 
that started chicks, three or four 
weeks only, have better, chances 
of survival for the poultry begin- 
ner than newly hatched chicks 
have . . . With the largest winter 
cabbage crop in histoiy, WFA has 
asked the kraut industry to make 
80,000 more tons of kraut. . . . 
Total U. S. war casualties as an-, 
nounced up to January 25 were 
142,289— including 32,662 dead, 47,'- 
123 wounded, 32,699 missing and 
29,805 prisoners of war ... In gen- 
eral, ration cost of meats is high- 
er and of canned vegetables, low- 
er during February— WFA has 
ordered packers to set aside at 
least 80 per cent of all canner and 
cutter beef for the U. S. armed 
forces . . . Prices of , fresh tongue 
range from four to five cents less 
per pound under recent OPA reg- 
ulation than under the previous 
regulation . . . Farmers and other 
bulk users of gasoline may replace 
losses from their storage facilities 
resulting from fire, theft, accident, 
or other extra-ordinary circum- 
stances, under a new OPA proce 
dure — WFA will soon release ap- 
proximately' 4,000 cases or 120,000 
pounds of dry peo or soya soup 
powder from government reserves 
to civilian consumers . . . The farm 
freezer industry advisory commit- 
tee has recommended to WPB that 
25,000 farm freezers, combining 
cold storage and freezing eleinents, 
be made and distributed in 1944. 






' - 



. i 



: 

1 




- 



: 









PUBLIC 

HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT AUCTION ON 
THE FLORENCE AND BURLINGTON PIKE NEAR UMA- 
BURG 

SAT., FEB. 12 

AT 10:30 A.M. (CWT) 

FARM IMPLEMENTS— New 2-horse cultivator; 2-horse corn 
drill with fertilizer compartments; turning plows; tooth, Acme 
and disc harrows; grass seed drill and hand sower; 2 single and 
2 double shovel plows; Dixie plow and other one-horse plows; 
one-horse and two-horse sled; 2 wagons with box bed and hay , 
frame; dump wagon; hay tedder; mowing machine; hay rake; 
horse drawn lawn roller; 2-horse field roller; manure spreader; 
triple, double and singletrees; 2 corn shelters; cutting box; hay 
fork, pulleys and rope; hog crates and loading chute; ladders; 
10 ! / 2 rolls of new barbed wire; 2 Ottawa log saw outfits; 40- 
gal. roofing paint; hand plant setter; tobacco sticks; 2 good 
tarpaulins; platform scales; all necessary hog killing tools, in- , 
eluding extra good lard and sausage mill, two 25-gal. iron ketles, 
one 15-gal. iron kettle; fencing tools and woven wire stretchers; 
lot of carpenter tools and vise; grindstone; motor emery wheel; 
cow chains; lot of burlap sacks; electric cream separator; milk 
cans and buckets; 2 oil tanks; mattox, hoes, shovels, pitchforks, 
bolts, and other small tools. One .22 rifle. Hay, some baled 
straw, and corn, n 



% 



Cincinnati and 

id Mrs. Wil- 

Lreturned to 

a few days' 

, Mrs. J. K. 






FLORENCE 



: 



LIVESTOCK — Four cows; 1 extra good Belgian mare; 60 sheep 
to lamb in March. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS— One cook stove; coal hot blast heater; 
circulating heater; 2 gas cook stoves; Perfection coaloil range; 
3 sanitary folding beds; 3 bedsteads; 2 wash stands; 1 bureau; 
2 grass rugs; child's play pen and crib bed; 1 feather bed; few 
chairs; 12-ft. extension table; small tables; sewing machine; 
wardrobe; victrola and records; 2 swing churns; hand churn; 
lard jars ; odd lot of dishes, pans and iron pots, and other tools 
and articles too numerous to mentoin. 



LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS 



TERMS— CASH 



MRS. SADIE B. TANNER 



COL LUTE BRADFORD ft COL. W0RTRINGT0N, Aucts. 



L. E. AYL0R, Clerk 



Mr. and Mrs. Will Nieberding, of 
Covington and Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Allen were pleasantly entertained 
by Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tanner, last 
Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Taylor 
and son Bobby were pleasantly en- 
tertained with a six o'clock dinner 
at the home of this scribe and 
Chas Beall, on Sunday evening, 

Mrs. Shirley Chipman, of Erlang- 
er spent Friday with Mrs. T. B. 
Castleman. 

Mrs. Belle Corbin, of Covington 
was Wednesday guest of Mrs. Lillie 
Corbin. 

Wilford Aylor, wife and son, of 
Aurora, Ind., spent the week-end 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ezra Aylor. His father still, re- 
mains quite ill. 

Cora Aylor had for her house 
guest her sister Mrs. Maud Satch- 
well of Union. Saturday afternoon 
she visited her brother Ezra Aylor 
and wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and family entertained a group of 
their friends on Friday evening. 
Guests present wire Mr. and Mrs. 
Ross Russ, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Pettit and Mr. and Mrs. Elby 
Dringenburg and granddaughter, 
and Mrs. Geneva Souther. 

Mrs. John Schram and a num- 
ber of the members of the Home- 
makers spent several days last 
week attending Farm and Home 
week at Lexington. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Snyder had 
for their guests last Sunday even- 
ing, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Craven 
of Newport, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. 
Barlow and Mr. and Mrs. Charlie 
Burris and son Eugene and Miss 
Anna Pearl Arrasmith of Burling- 
ton. 

Mrs. Laura Snyder spent WSatur- 
day afternoon with her uncle and 
aunts of Hopeful neighborhood. 
! Mrs. Wilford Mitchell of Alex- 
andria was a dinner guest Satur- 
day of her sister, Mrs. R. W. Mill- 
er. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tanner of 
U. S. 42 visited Mr. and Mrs. P. J. 
Allen on Thursday afternoon. 

We are sorry to hear that Jack 
Clore and son are confined to 
their home with scarlet fever. His 
many friends here wish them a 
speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Stella Stephens and Mrs. 
Lutie Aylor spent a pleasant after- 
noon Tuesday with Mrs. Ed New- 
man, 

Mrs. Mabel Garnett had for her 
guests- one day last week her 
nephew, Jackie yMbrris, of Cin- 
cinnati. * 

' Brodic Lucas has been confined 
to his home the past week due to 
illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ryle, of Bur- 
lington Pike visited Mr. and Mrs. 
John T. Stephenson on Thursday 
afternoon. 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Minnie Wayman is on the sick 
list. . 

Mrs. Lillian Ryle and family 
moved to Covington Saturday to 
spend the winter. We regret to 
lose them from our midst. 

The Girl Reserves have started 
a physical education class. It is 



being held at least*kmce a week. 
Instructors are Mangtoantach and 
Mrs. Caton. Most (j»the members 
have enrolled in tflte' class and all 
believe it will be ^ great benefit 
to them. The girls are also hav- 
ing another Bible Study course. 
Speakers attend * the meetings 
and give inspiring talks taken 
from the Bible Study Book. 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Jones, of 
Bullittsville were welcome visitors 
here, Friday. 

Rev. and Mrs. John Craven, of 
San Jose, Calif., who have been 
spending several days with Mrs. 
R. W. Miller and family left Tues- 
day for Cynthiana to visit rela- 
tives. 

Courtney Pope and family, of 
Belleview called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Ezra Aylor. Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Stella Waters, of Limaburg 
visited her sister, Mrs. R. L. Brown 
one day last week. 

Mrs. David Wing te of Dixie 
Highway spent last^ 'eek with her 
mother, Mrs. J. T. S phenson, who 
has been quite ill, b t is much im- 
proved at this write 
A. P. Renaker, of 
Mrs. R. W. Miller 
ford Mitchell hav 
their home, follow! 
visit with their s: 
Ammerman and htRband of Cyn- 
thiana. While there they surpris- 
ed Mrs. Ammerman, it being her 
birthday anniversary Saturday. 
Seaman W. Rogers, who is sta- 
tioned in Virginia was called here 
on account of the serious illness 
of his father-in-law, Ezra Aylor. 

Mrs. Mary Blanche Knipp and 
daughter left Friday for Virginia 
to visit her husband Pvt. Verner 
Knipp, who is stationed there. 

The Junior Girl Reserves con- 
tinue to have their meeting once 
a week under the direction of Mrs. 
Courtney. 

Citizens of Boone County will 
regret to learn of the death of Dr. 
John Walton in McAllen, Texas. 
Dr. Walton was a native of Boone 
County and a leading physician 
in Cincinnati, residing in Sayler 
Park until a few years ago. He 
had been ill for s year, having 
suffered a stroke. H died January 
14th. Dr. Walton k ves his widow 
and a daughter Mrs I. B. Leslie, of 
Long Beach, Calif; 1^ brother Ross 
Walton, of Chiciagp,, f Ill. Deepest 
sympathy is extendfjft to the fam- 
ily from friends in lioone County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Tanner Garnett, of 
Latonia, have returned home, after 
spending several drys with Mr. 
and Mrs. Lester Cra^-aft, of U. S. 
42. «• 

We are sorry to j. jar that Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell B; jhel's young 
son is ill with pneujionia. 

R. C. Houston, ofjSunset Ave., 
Erlanger visited hi^J sister, Mrs. 
John Stephenson on^JThursday. 

Lester Cracraft anp sister, Mrs. 
Floyd Sininger have*- been at the 
bedside of their mother, who re- 
mains very ill at her B home, Ger- 
mantown, Ky. 

Miss Georgiana Chitwood, of 
Ludlow and Clarence and Cara 
Jump, ■ of For, st Hills School are 
new pupils in the Florence School. 
Ezra Carpenter of Cincinnati, 
visited the Carpenter family, of 
Price Pike, Monday. 

Mrs. Mae Tanner a, d Mrs. R. L. 
Erown < spent Sund? afternoon 
with Mr. and Mrs. Vy^iam Waters 
and Ezra Popham and called on 
Mrs. Harriet Utz, of iimaburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adiain Sorrell 
have* purchased property in Kent- 
aboo. j 

Miss Bonnie Schra n enjoyed a 
few days visit witii Miss Tony 
Arnold, of Price Piked 

Mrs. Fannie Utz Sent Sunday 
with Mrs. EJla Anderson and 
daughter, of Limabu^. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harpey Fullilove 
spent Sunday with M^ and Mrs. F. 
E. Bennett. 

Mrs. Amanda Aylor; ind son Bob- 
by spent Tuesday aj ernoon with j 
Mrs. Lee Thon oson. / •" 
Mr. and M i ;. Her, jy Doll and 

- >-- k — LL 



daughter of Devon visited Mr. and 
Mrs. R. L. Aylor, Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Helen Orshell and son visit- 
ed Mrs. Luretta Aylor, Monday 
afternoon. 

Frank Rouse and daughter Betty 
of Walton, visited his mother, Mrs. 
Mary E. Rouse and son Carl, on, 
Saturday. 

Mrs. R. L. Aylor and son Bobby, 
were dinner guests Thursday even- 
ing of Mr. and Mrs. Pen Roberts 
and family, of Ken taboo. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stephenson 
entertained Sunday in compliment 
of Mr. and Mrs. David Wingate and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Am- 
brose and Mr. and Mrs. Clayton 
Brpwh and son. 



KEEP ON 



WITH 



WAR BONDS 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 



All persons haying claims again- 
st the estate of bora Mitchell Kin- 
dred, deceased, are requested to 
present same, properly proven ac- 
cording to law, and all persons in- 
debted to the said estate are re- 
quested to call and settle with the 
undersigned, immediately. 

' Wilford S. Mitchell, 

32-2t-p Administrator 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

J. W. Marsh, Woolper Creek, Bur- 
lington, R. 2. 

Robert S. Hood Estate, Constance 
Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



at 



• 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

(Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



A PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 

FIELD and GARDEN 

DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest 
farm year in history with tried and 
proven Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds — 
high in germination and purity — 
best all-around results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



■, 



CEORCCW. 



• 



Since 1863 



AMD 

COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 

24-26 W. . 25-29 PI 

SEVENTH ST. STREET 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

I SINCE 1863 



ay- 



"MY FEET ARE KILLING ME" 

DO SOMETHING 
ABOUT IT. 

DO THIS TOMORROW SURE I 

No matter how many Arch Sup- 1 
| ports or whatever kind of Shoes I 

you were disappointed in time| 
I after time — 

Go To People's 

LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT 
YOUR FEET 

|lt Cost's You 'Nothing! 

WE HELPED THOUSANDS— 
WE CAN HELP YOU 

I Three Foot Comfort Specialists! 

(Specially Schooled) will give. you] 

a FREE Honest Analysis on Your 

Feet. Learn the Truth about Your 
I Feet — The whole truth. 

^Don't suffer Another Day— Put Your Feet In Our Hands 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

% "Where Foot Comfort Begins" 



814-816 Madison Ave. 



Covington, Kentucky 



- 



/**•■ 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 









THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF JANUARY $1, 1924 



Florence > 

Willis Grant and wife had for 
their guest last week, Mrs. Mat 
Graves, of Bullittsville. 

Mrs. COra Stephens expects to 
leave soon for Florida, to visit her 
son, Lloyd and family. 
Rabbit Hash 

Mrs. Kenneth Ryle, of Burling- 
ton, visited her sister, Mrs. John 
Ryle, one day last week. 

Ivan Ryle , Carroll Williamson, 
and Melbourne Louden enjoyed a 
few hours skating, Sunday morn- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Smith have 
been very ill at their home irt Wal- 
ton for the last two weeks. 
Hopeful 

Mr. and Mrs. August Dringen- 
berg, Jr., and little son Irvin, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barlow and 
daughter Ethel Mae, spent Sunday 
with A. G. Beemon and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Creel had as 
the,ir guests Sunday, Russell Crad- 
dock and family, of Union. 
Petersburg 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd McGlasson 
and children spent Sunday with 
Benjamin Crisler and wife. 

Ed Geim's mother died last Sun- 




3ETTER APPEARANCE 

. W*e& of Glasses need not detract 
from youthfully "modern" appear- 
ance. Come- In today and see as. 

DR. J. 0. TYSON 
Jdffices with 

MO T C H 

Opticians — Jewelers 

61315 Madison Ave., Covington 
SINCE 1857 



^ 






DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FOEE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

I :. ■ 

CALL 

VALLEY 0887 

We pay 'phone charges 

Kentucky Dead Animal 
Disposal Co. 



day at the home of her daughter 
in Cincinnati. 

Hebron 

Friends here of Miss Delilah 
Florence were surprised to hear of 
her marriage last Saturday to Mr. 
Winfield Scott, of Covington. 

Mrs. Chester Anderson is enter- 
taining her sister, of New Balt- 
imore, Ohio. 

tMt. Zion 
. and Mrs. Carey Carpenter 
son spent Sunday with Mr. 
Mrs. Henry Carpenter, of 
Floi fence. 

M K and Mrs. Eli Surface and 
son spent Saturday with Mr, and 
Mrs Joseph Surface and little 
daughter, of Florence. 
Limaburg 

Miss Elizabeth Tanner spent one 
night last week with her grand- 
mother, Mrs. C. E. Beemon. 

Joe Sorrell was the guest of his 
daughter, Mrs. Herman Buckler, 
the past week-end. 
Union 

Mrs. Alma Head and Mrs. Nannie 
Holtzworth were shopping in the 
city, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Jones 
spent Sunday with Mrs. Belle 
Jones. 

Big Bone 

Brady Anderson and wife were 
called to Lawrenceburg, Ind., by 
the death of his brother, Sam. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jones are 
entertaining a nine-pound boy at 
the home of her 5 father. " r 
Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. Lou Olliver, of Covington, 
spent Wednesday and Thursday 
with Mrs. J. G.- Renaker, of the 
Dixie Highway. 

Mr. and -Mrs. Charles Bradford. 
(ner£jh»bn Orbini are rejoiced 
sincrlist Thursday over the arriv- 
al ci a f: le baby girl. 

Lower Gunpowder 

Miss Iva Ree Sebree spent the 
week-end with her . cousin, Miss 
Sheryl Ryle, of East Bend. 

Manley Ryle and wife spent Sun- 
day with Oth Hubbard and wife. 
Burlington 

Jack Eddins is still confined to 
his 1 ed. 

B. F. Kelly's house is nearing 
completion and he and his family 
will soon be residents of Burling- 
ton. 

J. M. Barlow spent several days 
the past week with his daughter, 
Mrs. W. P. Beemon . in Gunpowder 
neighborhood. 



More than 8,000 acres were 
planted to hybrid corn in Pulaski 
county last year. 



LOCKLAND, 



OHIO 



HO-HUMMM! 

What This Place 
Needs, Folks, Is 
A Few Good 
Ads In This 

NEWSPAPER 




- 

r 




2xk' 

'NEGLECT YOUR PROPERTY 
MAKE REPAIRS -flout! 

See Ut About a New Roof ! 
or Needed Roof Repairs 

Ton can't afford to Ut your horn* dopneiato for maod of • 
dependable, weather-tight roof. We axe roofing epeciaiista, 
prepared to give you prompt eervi o e to use the biggeat-value 
roofings money can buy— CAREY Asphalt Shingles. Tour 
choice of beautiful, non-fading colors. We handle all ifttlilfi 
No red tape. Call, or come in and sea us today. 

•Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 






STANDARD FOR OVER 60 YEARS 

50FING & SHINGLES 



BURLINGTON R. 2 



Mr. and Mrs. Bert Scott were 
calling in Florence Thursday aft- 
ernoon. 

Mrs. Lou Williamson was remov- 
ed to Good Samaritan Hospital 
Wednesday for a back injury re- 
ceived in a fall. 

Mrs. Rena Presser was calling 
on Mrs. - Jake Cook, Wednesday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Bert Scott called on Mrs. 
Jake Cook, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Deck and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Charlie Abdon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kermit Mallicoat 
moved from the Cam White farm 






• 



to the Jack Purdy farm. 

Cam White and Mrs. Percy Ryle 
spent Saturday and Sunday at the 
farm. 

Mrs. Cam White is with the Cook 
Williamson family in the absence 
of Mrs. Williamson. 

Mrs. Percy Ryle received Word 
from her husband that he is in 
California. Percy has met his 
brother there, unexpectedly. 

George Cook is home for a few 
days from St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pete West have 
bought the Presser property at 
McVille. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cook and 
Mary Lou Williamson spent Sun- 
day afternoon with Howard Press- 
er and family. 



Charles Gray, 4-H'er in Cumber- 
land county, grew 804 pounds of 
tobacco to the acre. 



1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 ■ ■ 
AT THE 

Gayety Theatre 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 l"l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Sonja Heine's future depends for 
the most part on her ice skates. It 
occurred to her that under war- 
time restrictions she would not be 
able to purchase as many pairs of 
skates as she customarily required 
in the past. Since the leather 
needed for the uppers is rationed 
and the blades demand the finest 
quality steel, it is not surprising 
that Son] a should desire to protect 
her skates — and her future. 

So Sonja, the lovely skating star 
of 20th Century-Fox's new film 
"Wintertime" decided to ask Lloyds 
of London to insure five pairs of 
her skates for $250,000. She felt 
that since she could make no more 
purchases it would be wise to pro- 
tect the ones she had against any 

catastrophe, natural or otherwise. 
• * • 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

High on the list of immorta 
football mentors like Alonzo Stagg, 
the late Knute Rockne, Pop Warn- 
er, Gilmour Dobie and Bernie Bier- 
man, is the name of the late Major 
Frank Cavanaugh, who guided 
Boston College, Dartmouth and 
Fordham teams to victory for 
many years. 

In RKO Radio's new screen of- 
fering "The Iron Major," Pat 
O'Brien portrays the great "Cav.s" 
career both on the gridiron and on 



the battlefields of* France. Ruth 
Warrick has the feminine lead as 
Cavanaugh's loyal wife, and Rob- 
ert Ryan and Leon. Ames head the 
supporting cast. 

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY 

Charles Boyer anfl Barbara Stan- 
wyck appear together on the screen 
for the first time in Universal'® 
"Flesh and Fantasy," coming to the 
Gayety. 

Miss Stanwyck is Boyer's fifteen 
top-flight leading lady a id "Flesh, 
and Fantasy" his si fenteenth 
American film. 

: ^ 

PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 5 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 
Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invi*,ed to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIS' CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginsq>„ Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 (tfftn. CWT. 

Morning Worship at lj:00 a. m, 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m, ■ 
. Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m.^ 




AD leading breeds O. S. 
Approved, Blood-tested, started ebi 



three weA» old. Price* 
FREE CATALOG. Writa: 

827 WEST FOURTH STREET 



right. AUavSexed 
KtNTUCrXVlATt 
» LEXTMOTiy. «3P 



two and 

"chicks. 

iTCHERY 

KKNTUCKT 



VERONA 



(Delayed) 
George Spenneberg is ill at the 
home of his daughter, Mrs. John 
Boyer. 

Mrs. C. C. Kannady is very ill at 
her home. 

Joe Rouse and family have mov- 
ed to the Jesse Wilson house and 
will take care of Mr. Wilson's cows. 

Tevis Thomas has moved into 
Arch Noel's house until his resi- 
dence is vacated. 

Mrs. Lorena Myers and son visit- 
ed her daughter Alice and family, 
Sunday. 



* * * 



KEEP ON 

'- WITH WAS BONDS • 



***** 



***** 



GIVE HER 

a permanent entitling her to 
lovely natural looking curls! 
Priced to fit any -pocketbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious cold wave. 

Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
Open Evenings 



More than 100 new ponds were 
constructed in Mercer county last 
fall. ' 



AT FIRST 
SIGN Of A 



a 






USE 

666 TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



LARGE SUPPLY OF - 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

a 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 







All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

GARDOSI 

Rear 24 East Fifth St. 
COVINGTON 

Phone Hemlock 8689 
Residence Phone Florence 386 




< V 



You can buy extra Bonds! 



;. 



Paul Baker had a big decision to make. It took him 
about two seconds. 

We, at home, also have a decision to make. We 
are asked to buy extra War Bonds at once. Our boys 
at the front are depending on us in this Fourth War 
Loan. Our patriotic impulse is to say "yes" first and 
look around for the money afterwards. Let us obey 
that impulse! It will do us good in more ways 
than one! 

Paul Baker sized his situation up in two seconds . . . 
and acted. We, whc«e duty is so trifling by compari' 
am, need scatocSf nm tune m which to do ours! 

Think! We are asked to make an investment, not 
a sacrifice! We are asked to invest the money we 
would normally use to replace automobiles or farm 
machinery or repair buildings and fences. We are 



asked to establish a depreciation reserve which will , 
be available for replacements after the war; ^o build 
up a financial reserve for unfavorable years that may 
come later, or for the education of the children, un- 
expected hospital bills, or the payment of taxes and , 
debts. ' 

War Bonds are the best form of financial reserve 
ever offered you. Your money helps finance he war. 
By postponing unnecessary spending you sp ;ed pro- 
duction of planes and munitions to win the \ ar. The 
gradual expenditure of your reserve after :he war 
will provide jobs for returning soldiers apd help 
stabilize the nation's finances in the postwar adjust' 
ment period. £ 

Ask yourself: Have I a single valid readbn why 
I should not buy extra War Bonds? Tien, like 
Paul Baker, make your decision and act! '/* 




Get ready for the day when Johnny 
comes marching home 



If you have a boy in the service, think 
what it will mean to have him come 
back and share with you the joy of 
equipping the farm with the best in 
tractors and other machinery. Think 
what it can mean for you to have the 
cash to put the children through college. 
Think what it can mean, a few years 
hence, to have new farm buildings or a 
new home or complete modern con- 
veniences about the place. 

To thousands upon thousands of farm 
and ranch owners who have bought 
extra War Bonds, these things are as- 
sured. For the first time in their live* 
they are going to be able to have the 
things they've wanted. Some of them 
are your neighbor*. How about you? 



| 



YOU NEVER GET LESS THAN YOU LEND 
And you get % more than you invest 

When held 10 years, Series E War Bonds yield 2.9% 
interest, compounded semi-annually. You get back $4 
for every $3. 

CASH WHEN YOU NEED IT 
Of course, no one should cash a Bond unless he has to; 
but if an emergency comes along, your War Bonds are 
like money in the bank. Uncle Sam wef redeem them in 
cash — at full purchase price — any time after you've held 
them 60 day*. Don't hold back a single dollar unneces- 
sarily from the purchase of War Bonds. YOUR HELP 
IS NEEDED. 

The Fourth War Loan is on! Your dollars are needed 
as much by Uncle Sam today as you will be needing them 



. 


FACTS 




About War Bonds (S.ries E) 


You Lend 

Unci* Sam 


Upon Maturity 
You Got Bock 


" 


$18.75 
37.50 
75.00 

375.00 
50.00 


$25 

50 
100 

- son 

1000 


00 
,00 
00 
00 
M 












I 



Don't Wait Until You're Asked . . . 

Buy These EXTRA WAR BONDS by Mail... today! 

Mail this to your bank, postmaster, or Production Credit Association 



tomorrow. 



This window dicker identifies you 
m the purchaser of extra War Bond* 
during the Fourth War Loan. It at 
a badge of honor - to be displayed 
with pride. Be the first in your 
neighborhood to have one. Buy an 
extra War Bond today! 



■OR AMERICA'S FUTURE, FOR YOUR FUTURE, FOR YOUR CHILDREN'S FUTURE 

INVEST IN EXTRA WAR BONDS NOWI 




To- 



Enclosed pie 



I 
I 

I U. 8. War Bonds. Series- 

I 



(Your bank, postmaster, 
find check for i. 



or farm organization) 
for. 



(total amount) 



-with 



(number) 
maturity 



Mr. 
Mrs.. 



j of J- 

I Man 

Miss 

I Address. 

I 
I 



-each. 



(E. F or G) 

Register Bonds in the name of aod mafl to: 



: t 



(First name) (Middle name or initial) (Last name) 



(If you wish to name either a beneficiary or co-owner. 
cheer which: 



Mr. 

Name Mrs- 
Mas 



Beneficiary D 



Co-owner □ 



(First name) (Middle name or initial) (Last name) 



Signature of purchaser. 



(First name) (Middle name or initial) (Last I 



MM BACK THE ATTACK! 

f \ ; 1 

This Adver tisemei tt Sponsored by 

The Consolidated Telephone Co. 



I 



L 



nam*. 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 








* 


- 






. { 

• 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Graves arid 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reimer 
and Mr. and Mrs. Billy Graves were 
supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edgar Graves, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Barnes cele- 
brated their 50th wedding anni- 
versary Sunday. Those present 
were Mr. and Mrs. Jess Barnes and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Crad- 
dock and family, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Black and son, Mr. and Mrs. 
Amual Hensley and Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy Barnes and son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter Jean spent Saturday 
evening with Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Wilson and daughters. 

Mr. and Mr*- Scott Jones called 
on Mr. and Mrs. John Jones, Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wilson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jake Blaker and Mr. 



Frank Estes i were shopping in 

?ovington, Saturday. 
Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour spent 
Saturday evening with*, Mr. and 
^tfrs. Ernest Collins and Mrs. Miri- 
.;de Shawe. 

'Mr. and Mrs. George Eggleston 
ind daughters and Ella Jean 
Vashmuth spent Sunday with Mr. 
und Mrs. Franklin Ryle and daugh- 
ter. 

Jerry Brown of the U. S. Army 
has returned to his camp after en- 
joying a furlough with relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Reitman 
and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reitman 
were in Burlington Thursday after- 
noon. 



Reported yields of Ky. 41A to- 
bacco in Hart county ranged from 
1,500 to 1,750 pounds to the acre. 

Simpson county has a 4-H club 
in every school with the exception 
of one. 






SMITH'S GROCERY 






BURLINGTON, 



We Deliver — Phone 74 

J:. KENTUCKY 



FLAKE HOMINY per pound 8c 

GRAIN HOMINY per pound 6c 

BISQUICK small size 20c 

PILLSBURY PANCAKE FLOUR 12c 

MINUTE TAPIOCA '. J. 13c 

CLINTON CHOCOLATE PUDDING package 7c 

CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE per pound 32c 

APPLES, eating or cooking per pound 10c 



CABBAGE, 

CARROTS ..i 

LEAF LETTUCE . . 
HEAD LETTUCE . . 

KALE . ..." 

KRAFT DINNER 1 



per pound 6c 

per bunch 12c 

per pound 15c 

per head 15c 

.per pound 12c 

brown point J 10c 



C ALLIES, smoked per lb., 2 brown points i 30c 

BREAKFAST BACON, per lb., 4 brown points .....] 35c 

COUNTRY LARD, per lb., 3 brown points , .19c 

FRANKS, per lb. 5 brown points J .32c 



WHEN IN TOWN BUY AT J. A. BAUMGARTNER 
LOWEST PRICES ON 



RUGS, MATTRESSES and FURNITURE 

COME IN AND SEE 



50-Lb. 

All Cotton 

MATTRESS 

$7.95 

50-Lb. 

All Felt 

MATTRESS 

$10.98 



9x12 Felt Base Rugs $3.50 

12x12 Armstrong Rugs.. $8.95 

9x12 32 Oz. Waffle" 

Rug Pad ..$5.95 

HEAVY WEIGHT 

GOLD SEAL ..., yd. 49c 



MAPLE BABY CRD3 $13.98 



Felt ■ 
Day Bed 
MATTRESS 

$8.95 

Baby Crib 
MATTRESS 

$3.98 



Bedroom, Living room, studio couches, ' chairs, 
rockers, occasional pieces and many odd pieces. 

Don't Forget The Address 
1046 MADISON AT 11TH, COVINGTON, KY. 



WINTER FARM NEEDS! 

Anchor White Enameled Coal Range $69.00 

Warm Morning Circulating Coal Heater.. ..$97.50 
At hens 100 lb. size Magazine Heater $50.00 

ANCHOR BRICK LINED HOT BLAST$A ft-00 
HEATERS in 3 sizes, $31.00, $39.00 and^** 

All sizes Oak Coal Heaters $13.00 up 

All Sizes Wood Drum Heaters $2.75 up 

Perfection Portable Kerosene, Heaters $7.95 

Jamesway Electric Chick Hovers $36.00 

200-W. and 800-W ELECTRIC UNITS to Build 
Your Own Chick BroodeHs $* .95 and $g.95 

for ./„ 



1, 3, 5 and 8-Gal. Poultry Fountains 

Poultry Feeders on legs * $5.50 

10-Gal. Milk Cans f 



5-GAL. KEROSENE CAN Full of 
Motor Oil 



National and Burpee Pressure Cookers 
Cold Pack Canners 



RED JACKET and DAYTON ELECTRIC 
WATER SYSTEMS 



Linoleum Rugs 6x9 to 9x15 

Window Shades 

Electric Wiring Material 

Galvanized Water Pipes and Fittings' 

30-Gal. Range Boilers 

Complete Line of Harness 

91/2 and 10-Ft. Bale Ties 

l-4r*2"xl2 9 Steel Sled Soles 

Hay Carriers, Track, Pulley and Forks 

Barb Wire and Poultry Netting 

Tobacco Seed and Fertilizer 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Remedies 

Conrad Hardware 



WALTON, 



KENTUCKY 



BULLITTSVILLE 

Mrs. John Moore and mother 
Mrs. Henry, visited relatives in 
Harrison County, Thursday. 

Corp. Parnell Combs, of Dyers- 
burg, Tenn., enjoyed a brief visit 
with Delbert land Chas. Engle and 
families, Friday. ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Maddox and 
son, Raymond Earl of Limaburg, 
spent Sunday with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Theo Birkle.- 

Mrs. Pauline Threlkeld of. Wheat- 
ley is with Mrs. Mamie Stephens 
and Mrs. Lutie Graddy, who^are on 
the sick list. 

Mrs. John Hopperton spent last 
Thursday with her brother, Elbert 
Moore, wife and children, of Beav- 
er. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reitman and 
daughters were calling on her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Clint Eggleston, 
of Petersburg. 

Chas. Patrick spent Sunday with 
friends in Lockland, Ohio. *- 

The Bullittsville Missionary So- 
city will meet Saturday, Feb. 5th 
for an all-day session at the home 
of Mrs. Russell Hodges, of Heb- 
ron. 

Miss Emilee Ledford spent the 
week-end with her father, A. Led- 
ford and family, of Lexington. 

Mrs. Charles Tanner is convales- 
cing nicely, after undergoing a 
major operation, recently. 

Mr. Sammy-Sams and Wm. Sams 
of Manchester, Ind., spent Satur- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Warren 
Lancaster and daughter. ■ 

Mrs. Myron Garnett and Miss 
Allene Stephens were calling on 
their sister. Mrs. L. G. Marshall, 
Thursday afternoon. 

Mrs. Elmer Cave and little 
daughter Joan, of Hebron, spent 
Sunday with Mrs. Delbert Engle 
and daughters. 



IN xMEMORY 

Of our only child, little Henrietta 
Rose Black, who passed away Feb. 
18, 1935, at the age of 4 years. 
Darling you have gone and left us, 
No one knows how our heart aches 

with pain; 
We lay at night with tear stained 

* pillows, 
Trusting and praying to meet you 

again. 
God in heaven please have mercy. 
Thou knowest how much sorrow we 

are to bear; 
We pray to God in all His glory to 

meet 
And be with you up there. 
Dear Jesus tell our baby 
Mother and Daddy knows she's 

there, 
We are coming to her some day, 
When Jesus says "Your time is 

here." 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black. 



and family called n Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Wood, Sur, ay. 

Mr. and Mrs. 4illiam Feldhaus 
and Orville Hensjiy, James and 
Benta Snow calleU on Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry' HolzwSrth and daugh- 
ter. Sunday. . jg 

VERONA 



DEVON 



HEBRON 



Arnold Craddock has scarlet fev- 
er. 

Billy Louis Goodridge spent Sat- 
urday with Mr*. Eva Williams, of 
Deverel St., Ludlow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Jarmen enter- 
tained relatives, Sunday afternoon. 

Lieut, and Mrs. Manny Good- 
ridge were guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Manlius Goodridge, Sunday.,' 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker Terrill, of 
Indianapolis, were week-end guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Jones. 

Several from here have received 
letters from Pvt. Sterling Dickey at 
Camp Plauche, New Orleans, La. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Garnett, and 
Marilyn and Ronnie were dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Tony How- 
ard, of Erlanger, Sunday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Baker called on 
Homer Baker and mother of Lud- 
low, Sunday afternoon. 



Boston baked beans can be extra 
delicious if soaked in soft water. 
Hard water toughens the skin. 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
called on Mr. and Mrs.-. Elmer 
Carpenter and family Monday. 

Carey Carpenter is suffering in- 
juries received when a horse bit him 
last week. He is slowly improving. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Shields on 
Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
and family called on Mrs. Alma 
Glacken, of Covington, Tuesday 
evening. 

Mrs. Maggie Glacken returned 
to her home Tuesday after a two 
weeks' visit with Mrs. Alma Glack- 
en, of Covington and Mrs. Carrie 
Robinson, of Ludlow. 

Elmer Carpenter sold a part of 
his tobacco crop last week and re- 
ported a good sale. 

Mrs. Gladys Carpenter and son 
Irvin called on Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Carpenter, Thursday evening. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wood and son 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Feldhaus 
and son called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Holzworth and daughter 
Friday evening. 

Quite a number of friends help- 
ed Sedrick Scott celebrate his 
fourteenth birthday Saturday 
evening with a surprise party. 

Mrs. Frank Bresser was in Cov- 
ington, Thursday, shopping. 

Albert Cardosi was a business 
caller in Walton, Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bresser and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Finnell and family, of Morning- 
view, Sunday. 

Word was received here that Mrs. 
Julia Finnell has a broken wrist 
received in a fall last week. We 
wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Wood and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Shields, j 
Mr. and Mrs. Ceberry Noel and) 
family and Mr. and Mrs. West Scott ■ 



Dry weather stilhprevails and the 
weather is warmer 'than it has been 
all winter. 

Uncle Billy Beach, who was kill- 
ed by a train Thursday evening of 
last week was buried at Concord, 
Sunday afternoon. " 

The following I idles attended 
the W. M. S. at 1 atonia Baptist 
Church last Thun ay: Mesdames 
Lorena Myers, Gra* e Renaker, Ura 
Roberts, Alice Clutpman, Lena B. 
Elliston, Nell Hun' i Maude Wilson 
and Pattie Waller t 

Mr. and Mrs. Rf f Lamn, of La- 
tonia and Mr. and Mrs. Arch Noel 
spent Sunday witi; Mr. and Mrs. 
J. B. Lamn. Jg! 

Mr. and Mrs. WSE. Waller help 
ed Mr. and Mrs. Ji T Lamn strip 
tobacco last Wednesday 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A Harris and 
grandson spent, Sunday with Mr 
and Mrs. Alfred K«mper and son, 
of Warsaw. 



BIG BONE - 



Mr. and Mrs. Noel Walton of 
Burlington spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. M. C. Carroll and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldon Ryle were 
called to Big Bone Tuesday on ac- 
count of the illness of her mother 
Mrs. Tom Hamilton. She is im- 
proved at this writing. 

Mrs. H. E. Miller called on Tom 
Hamilton and wife Sunday after- 
noon. ' 

Mrs. Elizabeth Pitcher is spend- 
ing a few days with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodge. 

Georgia Ryle called on her 
mother, Saturday. 



CARD OF THANKS 



Root vegetables are good for 
winter meals. To get the most 
vitamins, minerals, and flavor 
from them, cook the? in boiling 
salted water, about' « e teaspoon 
to a quart of wate If they're 
young, use just ehpuifi water to 
keep them from sticking to the 
pan. 



We wish to extend our deepest 
appreciation and sincerest thanks 
to all odr many friends, relatives 
and neighbors for the many acts 
of kindness and expressions of 
sympathy given us during the ill- 
ness and at the passing of our be- 
_ J loved husband and father 
George N. Parsons 

Especially do we thank Rev. E. 
M. Helton for his words of consol- 
ation; Dr. Nunnelley for his ser- 
vices; donors of the floral offer- 
ings and the Sand Run choir; and 
Chambers & Grubbs for their kind 
and efficient management of the 
funeral. , lt-pd. 

The Bereaved Wife and Son 



INCOME TAX— Save money by 
having your tax return properly 
filed. My system, no long wait- 
ing. Same guide that Internal 
Revenue men use. Evenings and 
week-ends. Rates reasonable. R. 
V. Lents, Constance, Ky. 32-4t-p 



FOR SALE — Coleman gasoline 
table top range, like. new. ' Hi. 
6524. Mrs. Frank Wilson. Crest- 
wood Ave., Cold Springs, Ken- 
tucky. - 33-3t-c 



FOR SALE — One oil incubator, 300- 
egg size; -one Oilostat oil brooder, 
300-chick size. Both in good con- 
dition. Miss Elva Hughes, Flor- 
ence ,R. D. Tel. Flor 326. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Seven 50-lb. shoats. 
F. G. Louden, Burlington, Ky., 

33-2t-p 



R. 2. 



FOR SALE— 1937 Willys coupe; fan- 
tires; completely overhauled. One 
hay wagon, complete with box 
bed and hay frame. John Terlau, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1. Tel. Burl. 
273 after 6:00 p. m. lt-ch 



WANTED— Lawn mower, t new or 
used. Phone Heb. 364-X. 33-2c 



FARMS FOR SALE 

59 ACRES near tfnion; 5-room 
bungalow, full basement, furn- 
ace, electric, large barn; rich 
land; fenced. $5500. 

23 ACRES near Builington; house 
and barn; most jpyel. $4500. 

52 ACRES all leve^rich land near 
Burlington; no bldgs. $100 per 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO 

rates. 
St. 



REPAIRS at 
COIonial 1121. 



reasonable 

509 Scott 

tf 



acre. 



61 ACRES near TJni' n; nice 4-room 
cottage, elec.; lar e barn; tenant 
house, all kinds I outbuildings; 
2% acre tobacco >ase. $5250. 

95 ACRES near airjtort state road; 
5-room house anjftarn. $10,000. 
107 ACRES nearmarsaw; fair 
buildings; 6-room house and 
barn, $4000. 

200 ACRES on Dixie; mod. bunga- 
low; 3 barns, mo t level land. 
$100 per a. 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all legal 
damage claims, plus up to $500.00 
each to you' and occupants of 
your car for injuries and med- 
ical services. , Save cash. Phone 
Walter Gaines, Burl. 509; Joe 
Dringenburg, Flor. 860; Earl 
Aylor, Hebron, Ky.; Ryle Ewbank. 
Warsaw 2318. 32-5t-pd. 



FOR SALE— 245-acre farm; 9-room 
house and one 3-room house; 2 
barns, electric; school bus by 
door. J. E. Snyder, 2^ miles N. 
of Bullittsville. Tel. Hebron 
264. 33-2-pd. 



WANTED— Farm hand to work by 
month; married; reference re- 
quired. Must be able to drive, 
truck. J. E. Snyder, 2y 2 N. of 
Bullittsville. Tel. Heb. 264. 33-2p 

FOR SALE — diie Duroc Jersey male 
hog, good stock; weigh 225 lbs. 



Price $35.00. 
Burlington, Ky., 
641.' 



Courtney Pope, 

R 2. Phone Burl- 

lt-ch. 



WANTED— Man to work by day or 
month; do general farm work. 
Mrs. Pearl McGlasson & Son, 
Constance, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
388. 32-4t-pd 



CUSTOM HATCHING— Two and 
one-half cents per egg. Eggs set 
each Thursday. Conner's Hatch- 
ery, Hebron, Ky. Tel. Heb, 113. lp 



KM 



RELC. 



Office: 623 W 
COvington. F 
Ind. 





ington St. 
e HE. 5107 



BIG 






CASH SAVINGS 



DATRY COWS— 12 head of heavy 
producing Holstein dairy cows; 
all Tuberculosis and Bang tested; 
18 head of horses; week's trial 
given. All stock must be as rep- 
resented or money refunded; 
easy payments can be arranged. 
Hog feed $1.65 per 100 lbs. GEN- 
ERAL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 East 
Second St., Covington, Ky., Open 
Sunday. lt-c 



FOR SALE — 1 Duroc boar 9 months 
old. B. C. Stephens, Petersburg 
and Belleview Pike, Petersburg, 
Ky- lt-pd. 

FOR SALE— New table model 
cream separator, used one month 
$15.00; 1 all-steel turning plow, 
.price $10.00. W. E. Snyder, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 889. 33-2p 



STRAYED— White Collie dog stray- 
ed from my place last week. 
Finder please Notify Norman 
Craddock, Burlington, Ky./ Route 
1. lt-pd 



STRAYED— White male hog, weigh 
275 lbs., found on my farm near 
Petersburg. Owners can have 
same by paying for this adver- 
tisement and feed. J. W. Grant, 
Burlington, Ky. l-p 



FOR SALE — Good work horse, 7 
years old, will work anywhere; 
weighs between 1300 and 1400 
lbs.; also harness. John Hop- 
perton, Burlington, Ky., R. 1. 
Tel. Heb. 146. 32-2t-p 



TOBACCO SEED— Warner's Gold- 
en Burley improved white bur- 
ley. Agents: L. A. Conner, Bur- 
lington; B. F. Elliott, Walton; 
Walter Renaker, Verona; or by 
mail. $1.50 oz., 75c y 2 oz. Clay 
Bedford, Cynthiana, Ky. 31-6t-c 



NOTICE— We have decided to con- 
tinue our sawing business and 
will be open at all times; also 
good line of sleds for sale. W. A. 
Waters, Limaburg, Ky. 30-4t-p 



FOR SALE— Upright piano, Fisher 
make; ebony case; good condi- 
tion. Price, cheap. Call Mrs. 
Grace Castleman, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. 39. 31-tf. 



OFFERED 



All Poultry-men 

FILL IN THIS CREDIT CHECK NOW AND SAVE UP TO l^PE^ CENT. 
CHICKS WILL BE BOUGHT EARLY AGAIN THIS YEAfc, AND WE AD- 
VISE YOU TO RESERVE YOUR CHICKS FOR YOUR FAVORIl 2 SHIP- 
PING DATE SO THAT YOU WILL NOT V ME DISAPPOINTED. & 

Money Saved Is Money Earned 



Good on any breeds shown on price list, but not good when less than 
chicks are ordered. 



100 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
S. C. RHODE ISLAND REDS 
l-^R. C. WHITE WYANDOTTES 
NEW HAMPSHIRE REDS 
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 



r 

NON-SEXED 
BLOODTESTED STOCK 



FOR SALE— Wagner piano in A-l 
shape; has had the best of treat- 
ment. Price $40.00. Mrs. Alton 
Buckler, Burlington, Ky., at Dam 
38. 32-2t-p 



FOR SALE— 26 Sheep, 2 and 3 years 
old; one Hampshire buck, eligible 
to register; and 95 bales of No. 
1 timothy hay. C. T. Easton, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1. Phone 
274. 32-2t-p 



FOR SALE— 75 native good stock 
ewes, located near Owenton. J. 
A. Lee, Glencoe, Ky. Tel. Avon 
5420. 32-2t-c 



PER 

106 



lillHIMIIHIIHIIIIinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^lllllllllllllllllllll^ 

5 Good only when returned to Full-O-Pep Feed 

5 Store, 512 Pike St., Covington. (Send your own 

E check or money order for difference covering full 

E amount of order.) 

E ' PRINT NAME AND ADDRESS i • 



Good on or I >, 
Marer. 1, lifc I 



fore = 



PAY TO THE 
ORDER OF 



31.00 



Credit for 
chicks 



ch 100 = 
red. = 



= ADDRESS 



Fill in total 
ordered here 
number chicks . 



FULL-O-PEP FEED STO IE 

By HUGO LANG 



lllllllllinir 



r. i i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiimiciiiiii 

We Sell DR - SALSBURY'S Poultry Remedies 
\ Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etcfe 






FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PIKE ST. 
COVINGTON, KY. 



HEmlock 9168 
Open Sundays T01 Noon 



FOR SALE— 1936 Dodge truck, 1^ 
tons; ten-barrel slop tank; also 
some locust posts. Wilford Dixon 
East Bend Road. Tel. Burling- 
ton 522. ■ ; lt-p 

FOR SALE— Boys' bicycle, good 
tires and in good condition; also 
milch goat. Hubert Ligon, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. Phone Heb- 
ron 141. lt-c. 

FOR SALE— 10 head of sheep! R. 
E. Tanner, Florence, Ky. Phone 
Flor. 804. lt-c. 



GET YOUR' TOBACCO SEED AT 
CONNER'S LUNCH ROOM— I 
have Ky. 41A- This seed is the 
latest developed by the Experi- 
ment Station, highly resistant to 
root rot, quick grower, high yield- 
ing. Also No. 16 Root Rot Resist- 
ant. Both of these seeds are 
certified by the State. The old 
standby Warner's Golden Burley. 
Come in, get the seed to produce 
the kind of tobacco your ground 
requires. L. ^L Conner, Burling- 
ton, Ky. 30-tf 



FOR SALE — DeLaval magnetic 
electric milker; practically new. 
W. O. Rector, Petersburg, Ky., R. 
D. Tel. Burl. 372. 31-tf 



FOR SALE— 128-acre farm located 
4 miles west of Union on Grange 
Hall-Burlington road; 3-acre to- 
bacco base; 3-room house; dairy 
barn and all necessary outbuild- 
ings. Farm in good state of cult- 
ivation. This farm being sold to 
sejttle estate. E. A. Connelly, Ex- 
ecutor. Address 449 Palace Ave., 
Erlanger, Ky. 3lH3-pd. 



FOR SALE: — 4-Room house, furn- 
ace, running water, garage in 
basement; room for bath, with 
V 4 -acre lot. Call Burl. 686. Leon 
E. Ryle, located at McVille, Ky., 
near Dam 38. 30-tf. 



WANTED— Girl for office work; 
experience not necessary. Call 
Huey Motor Express. Phone Flor. 
192. • 33-tf 



FOR SALE— 4-year-old mare, wt. 
1250 lbs; also 3 ton timothy baled 
hay. Henry Anderson, Youell 
Road, Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. lt-pd 



WANTED— Farm to rent or buy. 
Have own tools and two boys. I 
would like to have 4 acres to- 
bacco and other crops. Have 3 
tons mixed hay and one riding 
cultivator in good condition for 
sale. Ray Sparks, Walton, Ky., 
R. 2. lt-c. 



FOR SALE— White Rock roosters, 
good stock. Price $2.00 each. 
Roscoe Akin, Burlington, Ky. Tel. 
Burl. 170. 33tf 



WANTED — Gasoline washing ma- 
chine. Van Elliott, Erlanger, R 
4. Tel. Flor. 924. 33-2t-c 



FOR SALE— Two sows, due to fur- 
row around Feb. 20; 60 bales of 
redtop and timothy hay. Leslie 
I. McMullen, East Bend Road, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 2. lt-p| 



LET HELM help increase your 
poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years . contest 
winners; official world's records; 
.government approved; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. ojuly31 

TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COIonial 1121. tf. 



AVOn) DISAPPOINTMENT 

-BUY NOW 

Special This Week Only 

DINET SETS $19 UP 




Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison, Cov. HE. 9273 
TOUR 









Kj^ICTORY 


> Mi BUY 

-4raU| UNITED 

> \SSb * tates 

.Jm^ STAMPS 


— 



THE BOONE CO 






■ • 






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Statute 3 



. i'0 
i» Article If*' 



SERVe MID 



VOLUME 68 




ESTABLISHED 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February io, m4 



NUMBER 34 



RURAL YOUTH DAY 
SET FOR MARCH 25 



BOONE COUNTY YOUTHS TO 
MEET AT FLORENCE AT 9:30— 
COMPETENT AND TRAINED 
LEADERS WILL BE HEARD. 



. 



This, and following articles, 
which will be in The Recorder 
weekly for" the next several weeks, 
will be addressed especially to the 
youth of Boone County. We hope 
that any parents who read this 
article will call attention to it to 
their children who are 12 years of 
age or older. 

Realizing that the world of to- 
morrow will be run by the young 
people of tpday, it is the sincere 
desire of many of the leaders in 
this County that we give to 'the 
youth of this county all the ad- 
vantages possible, both spiritual 
and material. Realizing also that 
all material gain and wealth and 
prosperity comes from the earth 
which is the Lord's, there must be 
a direct connection between things 
spiritual and things material. 

Ip. order to create a feeling of 
mutual understanding, fellowship, 
and unity among the young people 
of our county, a number of the 
leaders of the county are endf*avor- 
ing on Saturday, March 25, to 
gather all the young people of our 
county together at the Florence 
school beginning at 9:30 in the 
morning, for the purpose of hold- 
ing a Rural Youth Conference, at 
which time we will discuss the fol- 
lowing subjects under competent 
and trained leadership: 

1. The Spiritual, Cultural, and 
Physical Advantages of Living on 
a Farm. 

2. The Priceless Heritage of the 
Farm. 

3. Rural Life versus City Life. 

4. Cooperation of Federal and 
State Agriculture Agencies as a 
Means to a Democratic Way of 
Life. 

5. Means Toward a Good' and 
Happy Life on the Farm. • 

6. Conservation and Wildlife. 

7. What the Farm Youth Needs 
and Wants. 

Under these headings each 
young person will have opportuni- 
ty to express himself or herself as 
to what they feel would be the best 
solution to the subject. 

We ask for the sincere coopera- 
tion of every organization in our 
county, the Church, the 4-H Clubs, 
the Boy Scouts, the Girl Reserves, 
the Hi-Y, the Parent-Teacher Asso- 
ciations, the Homemakers' Clubs 
the Utopia Club, the schools and 
all other organizations that are in- 
terested in giving our youth a bet- 
ter understanding and encourage- 
ment in facing the world of to- 
morrow. 

Let us not forget the date — Sat- 
urday, March 25, the time 9:30 a. 
m., the place Florence school. 

Young folks— this is for you 
The cost — nothing. So let's talk it 
up! 



Four-H Crops Average $54.90 

ji ■ I, ' ■ \* 

Miss Janet Pope, a member of 
the- Grant 4-H Club, sold 294 
pounds of tobacco for an average 
of $54.90 per hundred pounds. 
Janet completed two Home Econ- 
omics projects in addition to her 
tobacco project. 



UTOPIA MAKES 
PLANS FOR 1944 



WILL SPONSOR RECREATION 
PROGRAM, FEATURING FOLK 
GAMES— MEETING SET FOR 
FEBRUARY 17TH. 



J 






The Boone County Utopia Club 
will sponsor a special rural recre- 
ation program in 1944, according 
to Elva Akins, Club Reporter. All 
communities in the county are in- 
vited to take part. 

The recreation program will fea- 
ture folk games and community 
group games that will be of spec- 
ial interest to the, older youth. Carl 
W. Jones, Older Boys and Girls 
Specialist, will > be, in jcharge of the 
leaders' training program . 

All who are interested in rural 
youth training are urged to attend 
the Utopia meeting Thursday 
evening, February 17, at Burling- 
ton school, at 7:45 p. m. A spec- 
ial meeting for the leaders want- 
ing additional training will be 
held Friday evening. Mr. Jones 
will assist at both meetings. 



Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Vice and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ryle and 
family, Miss Louise Mahorney and 
George Cook spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Cook. 



Boone County Red Cross 

Nursing Activities 



AU schools have been visited dur- 
ing the past month, and health in- 
spection done in most of them. 
Immediately following these in- 
spections the nurse visited as 
many homes of children with 
marked defects, as time permits. 
The results are very gratifying. In 
most instances parents have need- 
ed corrections made immediately. 

Now that the Home Nursing 
group in Walton High School has 
completed the course, another 
class has been started in Hebron 
High School. Hebron was selected 
because an authorized Home Econ- 
omics instructor may give a part of 
this work, and there is not suffici- 
ent time left in the school year 
for the nurse to do it all. 

Due to the present shortage of 
doctors and nurses, the National 
Red Cross Is stressing? Home Nurs- 
ing classes, probably more than 
any phase of Public Health Nurs- 
ing at the present time. 

When school is out, the county 
nurse will have time for a number 
of classes. Any community in 
Boone County desiring this course, 
may have it at that time if the re- 
quest comes in before other plans 
have been made to take the nurse's 
time. There should be from twelve 
to twenty in a group. 

Requests may be made to R. I. 
Rouse, Chapter Chairman, Mrs. 
Walter Ferguson, Chairman of the 
Nursing Committee or Elizabeth 
Lowry, County Red Cross Nurse. 



FARM LEADERS 
PLAN PROGRAM 

HOME FOOD PRODUCTION CON- 
TESTS PLANNED— TEN POINT 
PROGRAM OUTLINED AT 
MEETING. 



Boone County "Live-at-Home" 
program leaders met at Burling- 
ton last Wednesday afternoon to 
plan ways of encouraging greater 
home food production in 1944. The 
leaders recommended the following 
program to be carried out. 

1. Every family attempt to raise 
all the home food requirements 
possible and to can, store, preserve 
and use these foods, so that every 
rural family has an abundant sup- 
ply of highly nutritious foods. 

2. A county contest be held this 
year in which the rural family that 
does the best job of producing and 
storing for winter receive a speci- 
al prize. The prize to be sponsor- 
ed by local business organizations. 
The winners of the contest will be 
judged by a special committee ap- 
proved by the Homemakers' organ- 
ization. 

3. One or more garden demon- 
strations in each community. 

4. One or more canning demon- 
strations in each community to 
be sponsored by Homemakers' 
Clubs?---* 

5. Timely news articles on food 
production. 

6. Special information letters to 
all garden leaders. 

7. Hold poultry production meet- 
ing on March Jst. 

8. Distribute leaflets on improv- 
ed garden, canning and other 
home food production practices 
thru Homemaker clubs and 4-H 
clubs. 

ft. Sponsor food production dem- 
on Titration at 4-H Rally Day and 
the Fair. 

10. Each Homemakers* Club and 
Community Agricultural Improve- 
ment Committee has elected speci- 
al home food production leaders to 
assist in carrying out. a better 
home food production program this 
year. , 






Holidays Returned 



Governor Willis signed a bill re- 
pealing a 19*42 law that limited for 
the. war's duration state holidays 
to Independence Day,» Labor Dajf 
and Christmas. 

The repealer, sponsored by banks 
and other interests, had an emerg- 
ency clause making it effective im- 
mediately. ""* 

In addition to the three allowed 
under the 1942 act, the others that 
regain recognition are New Year's 
Day; Lee's Bijthday, January 19; 
Lincoln's Birthday, February 12; 
Washington's Birthday, February 
22; Decoration Day, May 30; Con- 
federate Memorial Day, June 3; 
Columbus Day, October 12, and 
Armistice Day, November It. 

In accordance" wfth'i ' *he; ■ above 
law, all banks In Boone County will 
be closed on Saturday, February 12, 
Lincoln's birthday, and will observe 
all others mentioned as legal holi- 
days. 



Tobacco Crops 

, Bring High Averages 

Lawrence Barnes of Petersburg 
sold his enire crop, consising of 722 
pounds on the Lexington market 
Monday for an average of $58.62 
per 100 pounds. 

J. J. Barnes, also of Petersburg 
sold his entire tobacco crop, con- 
sisting of 4420 pounds for an aver- 
age of $56.42. 

Sebrpe Bros., Burlington, sold 
3922 pounds of tobacco Monday 
for* an average of $56.56 per 100 
pounds. ; 



COMPLETION OF 
FIRE HOUSE NEAR 



VOLUNTEER WORKERS URGED 
TO REPORT FOR FIRST MEET- 
ING AT FIRE HOUSE WEDNES- 
DAY NIGHT. 



Mrs. Willa Ratcliff 









Constance Woman 
Injuries Arm In 

Clothes Wringer 

Mrs. Hazel Kennedy, Constance, 
suffered cuts and a possible frac- 
ture, of her right arm Wednesday 
of last week, when she caught the 
arm in a clothes wringer at 711 
West Oak Street, Ludlow. 

Members of the Ludlow Rescue 
Squad were forced to take the 
wringer apart in order to free Mrs. 
Kennedy. 



Can Openers Still 
Have Plenty To Do 
In County Kitchens 

Rationing has not emptied the 
shelves of Boone County residents 
of canned foods it was revealed to- 
day, a total of 73,035 cans being 
used monthly, according to A. H. 
Nugent, general sales manager of 
the American Can Company. 

Mr. Nugent based his figure on 
the government's compilation of 
10,820 ration book holders in the 
county and the statement by the U. 
S. Bureau of Agricultural Econ- 
omics that the per capita consump- 
tion of canned goods during 1943 
was .225 cans a day. On the basis 
of the average size pre-war can, 
approximately 177 pounds of pure 
metallic tin is reclaimahle for the 
war effort from these cans, he ex- 
plained. 

Men in service eat 8,000,000 cans 
of food a day and millions of 
pounds of canned items are being 
shipped abroad for lend lease, he 
said. 

Many foods strange to American 
palates are being packed in cans 
for shipment overseas. One of 
these is "Tushonka" for Russian 
highly seasoned pork packed in 
lard. Squid, a variety of octopus, 
is being canned for Italian con- 
sumption. Canned foods for Eng- 
land are usually seasoned quite 
differently to those intended for 
American use, Mr. Nugent said. 



The bid Burlington Library build- 
| ing which has been selected to 
, house the Burlington Volunteer 
| Fire Department equipment is 
J nearing completion, after being 
rearranged to house the fire fight- 
ing trucks and to serve as a meet- 
ing place and headquarters for the 
firemen. 

The major construction work 
was let to a local constractor, 
which was completed last week. 
There remains considerable clean- 
ing and repairing to be done, that 
can be handled by local persons at 
any time. The plans now is for 
everyone interested in the comple- 
tion of the Fire 'Department to 
meet at the fire house at set in- 
tervals to do this work at the ear- 
liest possible date. 

The first work meeting was Wed- 
nesday night, February 9th at 7:00 
p. m. The success of these meet- 
ings will determine just how soon 
we will be able to complete the fire 
apparatus and get the organization 
to functioning. 

Work meetings w will serve as a 
forerunner to the organizational 
meeting which will be held ( Just as 
soon the equipment is ready for 
use. The Board bf Directors will 
select the .volunteer firemen and 
they will be trained by experienc- 
ed men in the correct way to fight 
fires and to use fire ■ equipment. 

All equipment is now in the 
hands of the department, but must 
be assmbled and put in order be- 
fore the department can go on 
the road. Every person who lives 
in the Burlington is urged to give 
whatever time yoU can to the re- 
mainder of this work as it might 
be your own home that needs fire 
protection firat. 

Both heat and lights are now 
available in the fire house and 
work can be done at night. If you 
are unable to attend the first 
meeting, please contact some in- 
terested person and make known 
yourv desire to help and you will be 
informed of plans to complete this 
work. 



Covington Man Purchases 
30-Acre Farm Near Big Bone 

M. E. Applegarth of West Cov 
ington purchased 30 acres near Big 
Bone Church from Mr. and Mrs. R 
H. Garrison this week, through A 
B. Renaker. 

There are no building on this 
farm, but it has a nice building 
site and the purchaser plans to 
build a home on this land when 
building material is available. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 



Sunday, Feb. 13, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m 

Hopeful Missionary Society will 
holds its monthly devotional and 
business meeting at the church 
on Monday, Feb. 14, at 8:00 p. m. 
Mrs. Wm. Meier will lead the de- 
votions. 

The Brotherhood will meet at 
the church for their monthly de- 
votional and business meeting on 
Monday, Feb. 14, at 8:00 p. m. De- 
votional leaders are Mr. Fred Klee- 
meier and Mr. Howard Kelly. 



FLORENCE P.-T. A. TO MEET 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the Florence P.-T. A. will be held 
at the school Monday evening, 
Feb. 14th at 7:30. There will be a 
Founder's Day program at this 
time.* All past presidents and 
members are requested to be pres- 
ent. & .,■ 



Fish And Game Club 

Will Meet Tonight 



The Boone County Fish and 
Game Protective Association will 
hold their regular monthly meet- 
ing at the club house, near Bur- 
lington, tonight (Thursday) at 8:00. 
All members are requested to at- 
tend. Refreshments.: will be served 
by the committee in charge. 

If you are not a member, attend 
this meeting and become a mem- 
ber. You need the club and the 
club needs you. 



Fourteen Visit 

Blood Bank Friday 



Fourteen Boone Countians visited 
the Blood Bank in Cincinnati last 
Friday. They were: Mrs. Wilma 
Conner, Mrs. Cecil Conner, Mr. and 
Mrs. Myron Garnett, Joe Hogan, 
Mrs. Irma Louden, Raymond Ash- 
craft, Mrs. Zophia Bagby, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Delph, R. R. Smith, 
Mrs. Mildred Rogers, Mrs. William 
Rogers, Jr., and Albert W. Weaver. 



17 HOMEMAKERS 
ATTEND MEETING 

HELD AT • LEXINGTON—HIGH- 
LIGHTS OF FARM AND HOME 
WEEK TO BE GIVEN AT FEB- 
RUARY-MARCH MEETINGS. 



The program of Farm and Home 
Week was considered exceptional 
ly good by the six homemakers 
from Boone County who attended 
the four-day meeting. Eleven oth- 
ers attended one or more days' pro- 
grams. 

The local group was particularly 
interested in the Wednesday pro- 
gram which was devoted to de- 
scriptions of life in occupied coun- 
tries and in prison camps. Miss 
Margaret Roed, who had escaped 
from Norway, felt that "perpetual 
vigilance is the price of liberty." 
Madame Chu She-Ming told how 
the Chinese are trying to minim- 
ize hate so that a lasting peace 
will rp,ve a firmer foundation after 
World War No. two. 

Highlights of Farm and Home 
Week will be given at each Home- 
makers' Club during the latter 
pa"rt of February and March. 

Those who atended part or all 
of the program are Mrs. Albert 
Willis, Mrs. Albert Pfalzgraf and 
Mrs. Jonas Stevens, Bullittsville; 
Mrs. Vernon Pope, Burlington; 
Mrs. John Schram, Mrs. Joe Berk- 
shire, Mrs. Harold Conner, Mrs. 
Clyde Arnold, and Mrs. John Mar- 
tin, Florence; Mrs. Gilbert Stewart, 
Verona; Mrs. W. F. Mann, Mas. 
John L. Vest, Mrs. Hess Vest, Mrs. 
Alan Gaines, Mrs. Alta Chambers, 
Mrs. J. C. Bedinger, Walton; and 
Mary Hood Gillaspie, Home Dem- 
onstration Agent. 



Funeral services for Mrs. Willa 
Ratcliff, who was killed Friday by 
a train at the Stevenson Road 
railroad crossing in Erlanger, were 
held at 3:30 Monday at the Philip 
Taliaferro funeral home, Erlanger. 
Burial »was in Forest Lawn Ceme- 
tery. 

Mrs. Ratcliff lived at 121 Stev* 
enson Road, Erlanger. She was 62 
years old. 

The body was thro* n approxim- 
ately one hundred f< jt, according 
to reports. The coroner said that 
Mrs. Ratcliff * suffered a badly 
mangled left foot, a broken right 
arm and internal injuries. 



County Bond Drive 

i Far Short of Quota 



: 



Harry McCi irg 



• 



Funeral services w^re held at 
1:30 p. m. Monday ^ft the Philip 
Taliaferro funeral home, Erlanger 
for Harry McClurg, 37 j. of 807 Orch- 
ard Stretet, Erlanger. ."He died Fri- 
day at St. Eli abeth -Hospital fol- 
lowing complications from a plunge 
he made from the thirtl floor win- 
dow at the hospital, January 22. 
Burial was in Fores£,,Lawn Mem- 
orial Cemetery? 

Dr.. James P. Riffe, Kenton coun- 
y coroner, said the plunge was 
made "apparently during a nerv- 
ous disorder he was experiencing as 
hospital attack »s said .fie told them 
after he had Shade tl e leap he 
didn't know what he ras doing." 

" — 



Mrs. Freija Bet. Brown 



Mrs. Frieda Beil Biiown, passed 
away at her home, feeaver Lick, 
Saturday, following a', heart at- 
tack. 

Funeral services were conducted 
at 11 o'clock Tuesday from Hughes 
Chapel Methodist Church, with 
burial in Hughes Chapel Ceme- 
tery. . | 

Mrs. Brown £s survived by her 
husband, Wm. Brown; two children 
by a former marriage; Scott Jones 
and Wanda Le ; Jones;; 7 brothers, 
John Beil, Burflngton, ,Carl Beil, of 
Bromley, David Beil, tff. Crescent 
Springs, Harvey Beil and Jacob 
Beil, both of Iydlow; and one sis- 
ter, Mrs. Margaret Glass, of Lud- 
low. 

Chambers and Grujjbs, Walton 
funeral directors werp in charge 
of arrangemen s. 



Mrs. Nettie F; Vest 



at her 
as a mem- 
ian Church 



Funeral services fori Mrs. Nettie 
Fullilove Vest j ere conducted from 
the Chambers3& Gruflbs funeral 
home, Saturday, Febn iry 5th. In- 
terment was in Walt 1 Cemetery. 

Mrs. Vest died lasi Wednesday, 
following an .illrn 
home in Walton. Sh 
ber of the Walt >n Ch 
for the past 3(£years. 

Mrs. Vest is survived by her hus- 
band Thomas* (Doc), Vest; two 
sister, Mrs. Robert Powers, Walton, 
and Mrs. Daisy Stone, of Coving- 
ton and several nephews and 
nieces. 

Chambers and Grub is were in 
charge of arrangemen i. 






' ,. 



Miss Clara Jltz 

Funeral services wl^re held at 
10:30 Wednesday meaning at the 
residence for Miss Cla ji Utz, 78, of 
140 Commonwealth jivenue, Er- 
langer, who died SuKlay at her 
home after a short ilteess. Burial 
was in Burlington Cemetery. - 

Miss Utz is survived by two sis- 
ters, Miss Nellie Utz, Erlanger and 
Mrs. A. Z. Carry, Detroit, Mich. 

Philip Taliaferro, Erlanger fu- 
neral director was in charge of ar- 
rangements. 

John N. Berkshire 

"■?■■"■■■" ■• 1 

John N. Berkshire, 80. passed 
away at his home in Petersburg, 
Monday afternoon, February 7 at 
1p.m. 

Funeral services were conducted 
from the Petersburg Christian 
Church by Rev. Noble Lucas, -on 
Wednesday afternoon of this week 
at 2 p. m., with burial in the Pet- 
ersburg Cemetery. • . £• 

Mr. Berkshire is surv ved by his 
wife Elizabeth; one da ghter Mrs. 
Max Gridley, of Pete burg; one 
son Frank, of Lawrenc >urg, Ind. 

Chambers and Grot s, Walton 
funeral directors were t- / charge of 
arrangements. \f 

IEBRON LUTHERAP^CHURCH 
Rev. H. M. Haute*WPastor 

Sunday, Feb. 13, Bibff School at 
10:00 a. m. .Mr. Woodford Crigler, 
Supt. I* 

The Luther League will hold its 
business and social meeting at the 
church on Wednesday, February 
16, at 8:00 p. m. All young people 
of the church, and their friends, 
are welcome. 



Florence Noses Out 
Burlington Five In 
Close Game Friday 

Florence defeated Burlington 
basketball team Friday night in a 
very close game. Florence collect- 
ed 26 points, while Burlington hit 
the hoop for 24. Zapp was high 
point man for the winners with 8 
points while Presser was high point 
man for Burlington with points. 

The Burlington second team 
chalked up a victory over the Flor- 
ence five by a score of 36-18. 

Hebron emerged victorious over 
New Haven Friday night by a 31- 
26 count. Hebron's attack was led 
by Bessler who chalked up ten 
points, while Moore collected 13 
for the New Haven five. 



ONLY FIFTY-FIVE PERCENT OF 
QUOTA REACHED, ACCORDING 
TO COUNTY CHAIRMAN— TWO 
PRECINCTS JOIN HONOR ROLL 



Engagement Announced 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Hoard, of 
Elsmere, announce the engagement 
of their, daughter, Loretta, to Cpl. 
Leslie T. McMullen, Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Leslie McMullen, Sr., of 
Burlington. 



FARMERS PLAN 
I IMPROVEMENT 



OF PASTURE AND HAY PROB- 
LEMS—RECOMMEND FULL TO- 
BACCO ALLOTMENTS TO IN- 
CREASE INCOME. 



Pasture and hay improvement 
are the two major agricultural im- 
provement problems in Boone 
County, according to H. R. Fork- 
ner, County Agent. Farmers in 
ten community agricultural im- 
provement planning meetings held 
during the past three weeks were 
unanimous in their opinions on 
this need. They also recommend- 
ed the growing of the full tobacco 
allotments as a source of increased 
cash crop income. 

Pasture forms the cheapest 
source of all livestock feed. Abund- 
ance of cheap feed is the most 
sound basis for all livestock pro- 
duction. Seven pounds of pasture 
are equal to 1 and 1-3 pounds of 
corn or 1 pound of soybean meal. 
One acre of excellent pasture is 
equal in total feeding value to a 64 
bushel corn crop. Hay is the sec- 
ond cheapest source of feed and 
ranks next in importance to good 
pasture. 

Good pasture has been one of 
the most misunderstood and un- 
dervaluated crops produced on the 
farm. The leaders in planning 
the 1944 agricultural program have 
recommended a year round graz- 
ing program that will start in the 
fall, with early sown small grains 
and legumes that occasionally 
furnish some pasture during the 
winter month and greatly reduce 
the hay requirements during the 
early spring. The small grain pas- 
ture would be followed with high 
quality permenant pastures with 
good lespedeza pastures in the fall. 

Farmers are faced with high 
priced seeds and less available 
labor. Regardless of seed prices 
every farmer should seed well all 
land ready for seeding this spring. 
At least two grasses and two le- 
gumes should be seeded. Lime, 
phosphate, manure and in many 
cases division ditches are great 
helps to higher production. 

Contrary to general opinion the' 
county rates high in quality pas- 
tures and hay production compar- 
ed to the adjoining surplus corn 
and hay producing areas. 



Subscriptions for the past week 
in Boone County in the Fourth 
War Loan Drive amounted to $91,- 
298.25, making a total of $289,285.75 
subscribed to date in this drive. 
This is just a little over 55 percent 
of the quota of $500,000.00 for this 
county. 

Hebron and Bullittsville have 
joined the honor roll with Belle- 
view and Beaver in having exceed- 
ed their quota. Burlington pre- 
cinct has subscribed $50,868.75 on 
its quota of $68,483.54. Figures on 
other precincts are not available. 

Some heavy work and heavysubc^y 
scriptions will hate to be -forth- 
coming before February 15th if 
Boone County raises its quota v 

Make no mistake — reacnlrig . our 
local goal in the 4th War Loan is 
the same as winning a battle over 
the Germans or Japs. Not making 
our local quota is like losing a 
battles-like quitting in the midst 
of action! 

Our boys didn't count the cost 
when they took Tarawa. We can't 
count the cost in winning our . 
battle. The only difference is that 
at Tarawa their very lives were at 
stake. And they gave them — for 
us. 

We are not asked to give our 
lives. We are not even asked to 
give our dollars. We are asked to 
lend them, at good interest — so 
that we can help hasten the war's 
end. So that we will have money 
to tide us over when the war does 
end. So that we will be ahle to 
send our children to school or col- 
lege, and buy the fascinating new 
products of industry when auto- 
mobiles once more replace auto- 
matics. All thanks .to the safest 
investments in the world today — 
WAR BONDS! 

But remember — we can't make 
Our county quota unless you first 
make yours. The State can't make 
its quota unless we make our 
quotas. And we as a nation can't 
make our quota unless each state 
comes through. 

Your quota is clear — buy at least 
one extra $100 Series E War Bond. 
Invest more, if you possibly can— 
$200, $300, $400— invest to the very 
limit of your ability, just as our 
boys invested their lives, the very 
limit of their abilities, at Tarawa! 
For America's freedom — for your 
freedom! 

We cannot — we must not fail our 
fighting men now. Making our 
quota in the 4th War Loan is one 
battle only we can win. Start 
punching from your pocket — to-, 
day! 

Every patriotic home in America 
will want to display this emblem. 
Paste it on your front door or on 
your front door or on a window to 
show that you have done your part 
in the 4th War Loan. 

LET'S ALL BACK THE ATTACK 
J 



Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Nicholson and 
son Kyle, of Walton were Sunday 
afternoon guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. D. Benson and family. 



BURLEY SALES 
VOLUME DROPS 



DURING PAST WEEK— SEVERAL 
HOUSES CLOSED, ACCORDING 
TO REPORTS OF STATE DE- 
PARTMENT. 






Kentucky burley sales last week 
were less than half the volume of 
the week before, according to the 
figures reported by the State De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

For the week beginning January 
29, Kentucky markets sold 26,245.- 



On Sunday February 6, Mr. and 
Mrs. Leslie McMullen, Sr., enter- 
tained the following guests: Mr. 
and Mrs. Reuben Kirtley and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur) 706 pounds, while during the last 
Rvle and family, Mr. and Mrs. week the poundage dropped to !«,- 
HenVSiarkTnd son, Mrs. Dorothy «BW This amount brought 
Ryle, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. McMulleri, 



Mr. and Mrs. Owen Hoard and 
sons, Miss Loretta Hoard, and Cpl. 
Leslie T. McMullen, Jr. 



Burlington P.-T. A. To Meet 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the Burlington P.-T.' A. will be held 
at the acbQlhouse on Monday night 
February.iith; at: 7j9AaP-i.m. Fol- 
lowing the business ; meeting a 
lunch and social hour will be held. 
Eachwqman is requested to bring 
sandwiches, potato chips and 
pickles. v 



$5,460,726.17; an average of $43.81 
a hundredweight, or 59 cents be- 
low the $44,40 of the preceding 
week. 

Total volume last week for the 
nation's burley marts was given as 
14,251,973 pounds by the War Food 
Administration, for an average of 
$43.67, or '71 cents below that of 
the previous week. 

Markets holding their last fc 
al auctions last week — though some 
will sell odd lots informally— in- 
cluded Springfield, Bloomfield, 
Bowling Green and Glasgow, Ky., 
and Huntington, W. Va. Only two 
sales were conducted on the Ten- 
nessee markets during the week. 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 






f\ 



g 



H-nn-IB CflllNTY REEIIRIIER 



A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 
RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 



PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY 



BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 

ADVERTISING INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per column inch. 

NOTICES AND CARDS o*~ THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. , > 

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word one, cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 

MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
ems; column depth, 21 inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate .$150 Per Year 



MEMBER 

AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Years 



MEMBER 

kentucky presj 
(as sociation , 

otamiib IZffltn *«•» 



A STITCH IN TIME 

Oldsters who lived through the 
reconstruction years following the 
last war will unanimously approve 
legislation that will 'provide pay- 
ments of a few hundred dollars to 
every soldier mustered out of ser- 
vice. This is a payment . that 
might be described by a commerci- 
al term "for value received." It 
will forestall such tragedies as 
those of 19-19-20 when tens of 
thousands of veterans searched 
everywhere for jobs and couldn't 
find them. 

Then some group started . the 
idea of "A march on Washington," 
and that led to the "soldiers bonus 
armies," making their appeals to 
Congress. Finally thousands of 
veterans were driven out of the 
Capital. Those men wanted jobs, 
and wages to enable them to take 
up the broken threads of life and 
to support their families. No one 
wants to see a repetition of that 
kind of desperation and .misery. 
The answer is found in mustering- 
out-pay, which Congress is making 
in as liberal sums as possible. 



PUBLIC OPNION AND PREJUDICE 

Polls of public opinion appear to 
have been reduced to measuring 
the importance of public prejud- 
ices. Reporters who take their 



whirls through Washington and 
other large cities find that the 
"man in the street" is apt to have 
decided opinions, land he may 
"love" or "hate," without modera- 
tion. Those "men in the street" 
will tell you that the whole coun- 
try is going to the bow-wows if so- 
and-so is elected, while all will 
turn out fair and lovely if this 
other fellows gets in. He may be 
talking about Roosevelt, Wallace, 
Dewey or Willkie — those four being 
the most popular victims of loose 
conversation. One matter of im- 
portance on the great Home Front 
concerns the recovery of what 
might be called "sober-thinking." 
— e— 
GOOD AND BAD NEWS 
TRAVELS FAST 

There isn't any particular evid- 
ence in the National Capital that 
Congressmen absorbed much more 
information from their own people 
during their trips back home than 
had reached them in the ground- 
swells before they went away. 

Things are different from what 
they were in the first World War 
when it took weeks to discover the 
trend of events "back home." We 
have better newspapers and fast- 
er news than 25 years ago; radio 
has changed communication to a 
matter of minutes. The airplane 
has done as much in annihilating 
time in transportation. 

FRAUDS AND CRIMES 

A few firms that have had war 
contracts are being put on the car- 
pet in Washington while other 
concerns and individuals are being 
prosecuted. The number of rob- 
beries, murders and crimes have 
increased alarmingly. . It is all too 
bad. But it is history repeating 
itself. We had the same conditions 
in the first World War, and there 
is no reason to believe that frauds 
and crimes will be less than last 
year. It's just too bad — so be care- 
ful and "watch your step." 



The Greatest Mother 
In The World 




N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



Mother nature gives the birds 
miscroscopic eyes to see tiny grain 
from a distance, and how she cares 
for us humans. 

For instance, when we bruise 
our feet by wearing poorly con- 
structed or ill fitted shoes. Nature 
sets up protective layers, corns, 
callouses and bunions, at the point 
where the attack is directed, and 
by means of pain telegraphs the 
brain that danger is at hand and 
how do we respond to nature's 
signal? Usually, by padding these 
protective layers, or paring them. 
This of course, does relieve .the 
pain but does NOT remove- the 
cause of the trouble corns, cal- 
louses and bunions are merely 
symptoms telling you there is 
something wrong fhside your feet. 

Permanent relief will be ob- 
tained when you relieve pressure 
on delicate nerves and tissue, when 
you straighten up weak, inrolling 
feet that throw the strain of 
weight bearing into the outer 
arch. Eo, if you would really get 
at the bottom of your foot ills, by 
all means, see our foot comfort 
specialists — they will make a 
scientific foot analysis of your foot. 
Then foot comfort is absolutely 
assured. — Adv. 



Go To Church 



BELLEYIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. " Guth, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. I.tgers, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone Is cordially Invited to 
attend these services. 



~IMPROVi 

UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 



SUNDAY I 
CHOOL L< 



By HAROLD L. LUNDQU1ST. D. D. 

Offlrhe Moody Bible Institute of Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 



Lesson for February 13 



Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



EAST BE ND M ETHODIST 

CHUDCH 

Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and third 

Sunday evening at 7 p. m.; also 

every fifth Sunday mornine and 

evening. 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Robt. Carter, Paster 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 

Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 

Church 12:08 E W. T. 

Evening services 8 p. m. E. W- T. 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship 8 p. m. 

Prayer Service Wednesday even- 
ing 8 p. m. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an ' work with us. 



^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 f 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■ II i ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1J_ 

1 PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. I 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 
Deposits Insured Under the Federal 






Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 

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| F. W. Kassebaum & Son, Inc. | 

Authorized Dealers s 

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'Rock of Ages" Barre Granite 

MONUMENTS 

Aurora, Indiana 

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4-H ACTIVITIES 

The Burlington 4-H Club met 
Thursday, February 3, 1944, at 1:15 
o'clock, P. M. 

Mr. Perkinson and Miss Gillas- 
pie gave a talk on the projects that 
were open. The members then re- 
tired to elect officers. In the boys' 
club the officers elected were: 
President, J. D. Daley; vice-presi- 
dent, Philip Yelton; secretary, 
Jimmy Wilson; cheer leader and 
reporter, Bobby Greene. 

Attention Members: All enlist- 
ment cards must be in by Friday. 
Everyone is looking forward to a 
better club year than ever before. 



RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 
Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

/ 10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00. a. m. Morning' Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 

t I 

PETERSB URG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. Harry 
Jarbo.^Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



JESUS ON THE MOUNTAIN 
, AND IN THE VALLEY 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 9:8-8. 17-27. 
GOLDEN TEXT— I believe; help thou mine 
unbelief.— Mark 9:24. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor , 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, Supt. 
Morning Worship .11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 pi nt. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.) 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 



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KENTUCKY = 



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g THE TEST OF TIME . . . 

SEE After more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 
we can safely say that our organization has stood this stern- 
= est and most exacting of all trials. 



Chambers & Grubbs i 



== FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



WALTON 352 
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PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH , 
Rev. O. B. Thomas. Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pas tor 

Sunday School 10:0 0a. m. ( CWT ) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT ) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 



BULU TTSBU RG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 

Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W: T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. for Juniors 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. * 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaugh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:90. 
You need your church. 



BURLING TON METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p.m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30 CWT. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Alrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 8:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

. Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r 

Sunday School at 11 a. HT EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m. EWT. 

P rayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



BULLITT SBUB O BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. | 

Preaching first and third Sun* 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed Shinfcle, Supt. 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. 

Evening Service at 7:30 (C.W.T.) 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p. m. . 



ierstanding 
of Christ. 
1st knowing 
ie is the di- 



The vision of the fountain top 
prepares the believe for service 
down in the valley. "J|Wiere there is 
no vision the people pe»jsh," said the 
wise man of old (Pro* 29:18). For 
want of a true vision of God, a 
knowledge of His truth; and the God- 
given constraint which makes men 
give themselves in sacrificial serv- 
ice, the people will perish in their 
sins. 

But let men come to know the 
truth as it is in Christ, learn to know 
Him as the Son of God glorious 
and powerful, and then let them 
translate their knowledge of Chris- 
tian truth and their personal spiritu- 
al experiences into the daily minis- 
try to the needs of their fellow men, 
and there will be songs of salvation 
and joy. 
I. Knowing (w. 2-7). 
The transfiguration of Christ 
doubtless meant much to Him in 
preparation for His ciming death 
and resurrection. It vas a fore- 
gleam of His kingdorr glory. 

In this lesson we t t concerned 
with the experience o^ he disciples 
rather than the feelingi Of our LOrd. 
Fundamental in both Ifflhristian life 
and service is a clear 
of the person and wi 
One may come to 
little more than that 
vine Saviour, and orfe may enter 
into Christian living with a meager 
knowledge of the doctrines of the 
Bible. But the Christian who fails to 
grow in knowledge will not grow in 
grace as he should. 

God sets no premium on igno- 
rance, in fact it is quite evident that 
the great blight on the Christian 
church today is the appalling lack 
of understanding of God's Word. 

The disciples came to a fuller con- 
viction that He was the Son of God 
as they saw Him transfigured and 
heard the Father say, "This is my 
beloved Son." They learned more 
plainly the truth of His coming death 
for the sins of all mankind. They 
saw in the indescribable- beauty of 
that moment the foreg earn of His 
coming glory. What imp rjant truths 
these are — His deity— is redemp- 
tion — His coming king^ip. Do we 
have a clear grasp of ftiese truths? 
If not, let us search the'jfcriptures. 
H. Growing (v. 8). ^ 
"Jesus only." He ^filled their 
vision and their hearts.^ They had 
made spiritual progress as they had 
seen His glory and heard the com- 
mending voice of the Father. 

Great experiences of spiritual re- 
newing and power are necessary to 
effective life and testimony. They 
may not be in outward manifesta- 
tion, in fact they are more often in 
the inner recesses of the soul; but 
they transform men andssend them 
forth to magnificent living for God. 
One wonders if much of the dearth 
of power in the Christian church is 
not to be attributed directly to the 
lack of such experiences with God. 

The disciples had an unforgettable 
mountaintop experience. ' Even so 
have many others found »he secret 
of power. 

Let us remember that ch privi- 
leges are not reserved \ a few, 
they are the birthright ft every 
Christian. Power without aowledge 
is a dangerous and destru^ <ve thing, 
but knowledge without p,' wer is a 
dead thing. 

Let us study God's 
the truth be baptized 
flowing spiritual power 
experience with God. 

In regeneration all tha^v Christ is 
and has for us is made, available. 
If we have not taken "out our inheri- 
tance let us do it at once.. 
m. Serving (w. 17-27) £ 
One of the lessons that seems hard 
to learn and to keep constantly ef- 
fective in the life of a Christian is 
that mountaintop experiences of 
spiritual uplift are not an end in 
themselves, but a preparation for 
service. All too often we come to 
regard such times of peculiar bless- 
ing, whether in the privacy of our 
own room or in the great confer- 
ence of Christian workers, as some- 
thing which should glow warmly in 
our own hearts, making us glad in 
the Lord, and not as a preparation 
for ministry to others. «j. 

Jesus and the disciples went up 
to the place of prayer, into the place 
of glory, and down to the place of 
service. • How fitting is that se- 
quence. s 

Much confusion exists, in the 
church because those who have fool- 
ishly abandoned God's Word and 
substituted the energy of 'the flesh 
for spiritual power have been most 
diligent in service to humanity; 
while those who know tod accept 
the truth about Christ, and who pro- 
fess to believe in the power of the 
Spirit-filled life, have failed to serve 
their needy neighbors: 

"But Jesus took him by he hand 
and lifted him up" (v. 27' Verses 
28 and 29 indicate that th< lisciples 
might have done the sar , by be- 
lieving prayer. 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 10, 1904 



"Plattsburg . 

Charles and Miss Lou Sullivan 
were guests at Newton Sullivan's 
last Saturday and Sunday. 

Miss Lou Acra and Lou Akin 
were guests of Hogan Wingate and 
wife last Tuesday. 

Belleview 

Benjamin Kelly and wife enter- 
tained with a delightful party last 
Friday night. 

Lineous Kelly and wife gave the 
young folks a dance Monday night. 
Rabbit Hash 

Miss Sylvia Wasburn, of Ler- 
mond, Ohio, has been visiting her 
sister, Mrs. Mary Hillis 

Rev. Charles Gant and wife, of 
Clyde, Ohio, were visiting the lat- 
ter's father, N. E. VanNess, a few 
days since. 

Buffalo 

David Marshall spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with Joe and 
Robt. Green. 

Mrs. Nannie Stephens, of Gun- 
powder, was visiting Mrs. N. H. 
Clements last Saturday afternoon. 
Commissary 

Miss Bessie Rodney Koons was a 
pleasant guest of Miss May Loud- 
en, last Sunday. 

Misses Fannie Clore, of Belleview 
and Pauline Kelly spent Thursday 
evening with Mrs. Ransom Ryle. 
Union 

Mrs. Lassing is the guest of her 
daughter, Mrs. Joe Collins, of Crit- 
tenden. 

Miss Bernice Johnson spent Sat- 
urday and Sunday with her sister, 
Eunice at R. Lee Huey's. 
Florence 

Mrs. Jennie Williams of Mays- 
ville is visiting her sister, Mrs. 
Carrie Carpenter. 

Allie Walton was the guest of, rel- 
atives here, last Sunday. 
Flickertown 

Mrs. Louis Hensley has been 
quite ill for sometime, 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Nichols were 
consderably under the weather" 
with colds last week. 
Hathaway 

G. A. Ryle, wife and son, Man- 
ley spent one day last week visit- 
ing his son, Elmore and wife. 

Mrs. Ethel Sebree and son Adol- 
pha of Woolper Heights spent last 



Saturday night and Sunday with 
her parents on Gunpowder. 

Idlewild 
. Winston Gaines has returned 
from a visit to his brother, Bernard 
and other relatives, near Oxford, 
Ohio. 

All friends congratulate W. B. 
Shotwell' on having his wire- 
stretcher accepted by the Patent 
Office at Washington. . 
Limaburg 

Mrs. Madge Wood was visiting 
Miss Clara Hossman, of Hebron, 
(Saturday and Sunday. 

Mrs. Jemima Tanner was visiting 
Mrs. Jerry Beemon, last Thursday. 
Gunpowder 

Miss Leila Floyd is visiting at 
Hartwell, Ohio, the guest of Mrs. 
Lila Paddock. 

Rev. and Mrs. .Slater went to 
Cincinnati, last Wednesday night 
to meet her brother, who lives in 
the northern part jof Indiana. 
Verona 

Will Snyder has purchased the 
J. N. Dickerson property near O. K. 
Whitson's store. 

The old Larry Devire residence 
owned by J. G. Tbmlin, was con- 
sumed by fire last Wednesday , 
night. 

Petersburg 

Miss Zerrelda Smith, of Ludlow, 
is visiting her father, F. D. Smith. 

Drs. Ray Grant and Hubert Wal- 
ton have returned to their studies 
at Louisville. 

Hebron 

Robert McGlasson is attending 
school at Ludlow. 

Miss Callie Lee Clore has resum- 
ed her study of music in Cincin- 
nati. . T j 
Walton 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Pollit, Sat- 
urday, a fine baby girl. 








NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
, ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
e hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

the first man you meet. 



i jK 

rofT^pi 



but let 
e over- 
personal 




BuixrrrsviLLE christian 

CHURPE 

Noble Lucas, Mini 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 

' i 



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THE BOONE COUNT! RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 




Keep en Backing the Attack 
with your purchases of WAR 
BONDS. Give War Bonds 
for Christmas. 







FIR BETTER 
[ HEALTH 

Periodic eye examination is 
essential for good health, 
proper vision and eye com- 
fort. Time changes your eyes, 
and as your eyes change your 
glasses should be changed, to 
preserve your eyes. 

How long has it been since 
your eyes were examined? 
Come in for a careful check- 
up of your eyes. Depend on 
our experience and equip- 
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AT THE 

Gayety Theatre 
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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

Stan Laurel and OUver Hardy 
are conga-cuckoo and hula-happy 
in their most hilarious hit, "The 
Dancing Masters," 20th Century- 
Fox's laugh riot. 

In the rib-tickling comedy, Stan 
and Oliver, cast as a pair of zany 
dance instructors, give the "Dying 
Swan" the coup de grace! 

Trudy Marshal lis cast in the ro- 
mantic lead of the film which in- 
cludes Robert Bailey, Matt Briggs, 
Margaret Dumont and Allah Lane. 
SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

John Wayne's screen roles here- 
tofore have been those of a husky 
outdoor action star, but the tall 
actor now makes his ,bid for ro- 
mantic leading-man portrayals in 
RKO Radio's comedy hit, "A Lady 
Takes a Chance." 

Co-starred with Jean Arthur, 
Wayne plays the part of a rodeo 
rider who meets Eastern white-col- 
lar-girl heroine in a little Oregon 
town when he is hurled into her 
lap by a bucking pony. He takes 
her on a breathless tour of the 
region, with hilarious results. 

Charles Wininger, Phil Silvers, 
Mary Field and Don Costello are 
featured in the supporting cast of 
the picture. 

TUESDAY 

] (Double Feature) 

Mirthful intrigue among night- 
club performers is the diverting 



• • 




To Taxpayers of Boone County 

THE LAST DAY TO PAY YOUR 1943 TAXES 
BEFORE THE PENALTY IS ADDED IS 

FEBRUARY 29, 1944 



WILLIAMS, Sheriff 

OF BOONE COUNTY 



theme of Universale "Larceny With 
Music." Allan Jones, Kitty Car- 
lisle and Leo Carrillo are co-star- 
red in the entertaining new time- 
film which boasts one of the sea- 
son's most attractive musical scores 

William Frawley and Lee Pat- 
rick are featured in a large cast of 
well, known players. Added fea- 
ture extraordinary is the appear- 
ance of Alvino Rey and his orch- 
estra, and the King Sisters. 
Also 

Margaret Lindsays who has a 
penchant for leading roles in mys- 
tery thrillers, plays the femme lead 
in Columbia's "Crime Doctor." 
Prior to her appearance with War- 
ner Baxter in this screen version of 
the radio serial, Miss Lindsay had 
appeared in a number of Ellery 
Queen mysteries for Columbia, as 
well as in that dramatic thriller, 
"No Place For a Lady." 

• • • ' 

WED., THURS., AND FRIDAY 

Dinah Shore, the Nashville song- 
bird ,is having her troubles becom- 
ing acquainted with the movie 
cameras. 

Miss Shore is making her film 
debut in Warner Bros.' all-star 
musical, "Thank Your Lucky Stars" 
coming to the Gayety. She sings, 
she dances and she acts. She says 
she'd be having the time of her 
life except for the camera. The 
microphone, of course, is an old 
friend, because of her radio ex- 
perience. . 

But that camera! Miss Shore 
prefers to pour out her heart in 
romantic melody with her eyes 
closed. The camera doesn't like 
that. She has the habit of roam- 
ing about at the spirit moves her 
between bursts of melody. The 
camera won't permit that. She 
must stick to the straight and nar- 
row way marked out by the tech- 
nicians. There are many other 
ways in which the mechanical ty- 
rant cramps her style. 

"It's all very thrilling," says 
Dinah, "but sometimes I feel like 
the bride of Frankenstein." 



ON KENTUCKY FARMS 

John and James Vansant. 4-H 
club boys in Elliott county, clear- 
ed approximately $71 in one month 
on their flock of 112 White Rocks. 

Ward Chumley of Bell county 
has a flock of 130 White Leghorns 
now laying around 95 eggs a day, 
or better than 70 percent produc- 
tion. 

Garrard county 4-H club calf 
members have 65 choice baby 
beeves on feed for the annual fat 
cattle show at Louisville next fall. 



The present with a future— 
WAR BONDS for CHRIST- 
MAS. Keep on Backing: the 
Attack. 







#*y<m9mmi, < M > ■ ■ -*- 



. «W pW* J >i»..,» x < 



"»^ 






HELP 'EM FINISH 

THE JOB! 






? i 



.1— 







Buy EXTRA 
War Bonds Now! 






Everywhere in this global war, our -"^g^ 

armed forces are relentlessly pressing 

the offensive against the enemy. 

Thanks to their heroic efforts, total So no matter what your bond buying 

victory is undoubtedly closer but has been in the past, step it up, 

military leaders warn us this is no increase it, buy at least one extra 

time for donning rose-colored glasses. $100 bond during the Fourth War 



The decisive battles are still 
to be fought. Millions of 
dollars worth of equipment 
must be made and delivered 
to the fighting fronts. There 
can be no let-up in the flow 
of arms our men must have 
to overwhelm and destroy 
the enemy. • , 




This sticker m your 
window show! you 
bought extra War 
Bonds. Display it 
Proudly! 



Loan, and more if possible. 
Whatever sacrifice it may 
involve, it's nothing com- 
pared to those being made 
every day by the men at grips 
with the enemy. Help them 
finish the job — bring them 
home sooner — by buying 
extra War Bonds now! 



•A&Ui BACK THE ATTACK! 

The Advertisement Sponsored by 
COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



GAYETV 
THEATRE 1 



ERLANGEB, ELSMERE. KT 

FREE PARKING LOT 

SHOW TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:00 and 8:45 p. m. 

Sat. 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 p. m. 

Sunday 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p. m. 










THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 



TONIGHT 

FEBRUARY 10TH 







Also Three Stooge Comedy 



FRIDAY and SATURDAY 

FEBRUARY 11 AND 12 

They're Rhumbo-Riotovtl 



uuLMIEL 
9uveb HARDY 

the # . 

Wncfo? 



with 



TRUDY MARSHALL 

Robert Bailey - Matt Briggs 
Margaret Oumont • AJtafi Lane 



rsing a case of 

I y 

family moved 
White Haven 



Also March of Time, "Airways to 
Peace and "Batman" No. 12 

SUNDAY and MONDAY 

FEBRUARY 13 AND 14TH 








CHARLES WINNINGER 
PHIL SILVERS 

aiso Cartoon and News 




TUESDAY 

FEBRUARY 15TH 
TWIN FEATURES 




ALSO 




WED., THURS. & FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 16, 17, AND 18 



HUMPHREY B0GA.BT * EDOIE CANTOR 
BETTE DAVIS * OLJVLA de HAVILUND 

ERROl FLYNN *J0HN GARFIELD *J0AN LESLIE 
IDA LUPINO * DENNIS MORGAN 

ANN SHENDAN*DIN AH SHOR£*ALEXB SWTH 




Alio Cartoon 



For your convenience this 
Theater sells WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 

box office. 



RABBIT 3ASH 

<Dela; jd) 

Solon E. Ryle l«f for California 
this week. 

Madge .Fritz and ler husband, of 
Ohio spent the we«Vend with her 
grandmother, Mrs.: Lou VanNess 
and son Joe. 

Wilbur Acra and* family enter- 
tained the following guests Sun- 
day: Harry Acra ^nd wife, Ray- 
mond Acra and fan ily, H. M. Clore 
and family, W. \ Stephens and 
this scribe. i 

S. C. Wilson is n< 
mumps this week 

I. D. Isaacs and 
last week near th 
School. | 

Robt. Williamson* and family 
spent Sunday with*' her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Craig. 

farmers have beg in to plow and 
make plant beds i , this vicinity 
during the past we< \. . 

Five warships pa^ led down the 
river this week. 

-Raymond Acra aisd wife spent 
Saturday afternoori4and night in 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Mellie Wingite spent the 
week-end with henffiusband. She 
is still nursing her iirother who is 
very ill. { 

John Louden has, rented one of 
Mrs. Sallie Myrick's*places for this 
year. 



RIVER VIEW 

John E. Hodges regains critically 
ill. We pray for hii \ a speedy re- 
covery. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Hi|rry Acra, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hubert ClVe and grand- 
daughter Arlene. W B. Stephens, 
Blufe Clore spent Sunday with 
Jack Acra and famw. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hei'ry Black were 
the supper guests uf her sister, 
Mrs. Hazel Smith aid husband on 
Saturday evening an attended the 
show at Erlanger. J 

Mr. and Mrs. I.rx). Isaacs and 
family moved f ronf' Orville Hen- 
sley's farm to Mr. *|Ietzger's farm 
on Highway 42, knol^ti as the Jesse 
Delahunty farm. , > 

E. L. Stephens sailed on his 
brother W. B. Stephens one day 
last week. 

Miss Velma Lee Black spent the 
past week with Miss 'Gladys Isaacs 
of near Union. ; *j 

Mr. and Mrs. Clajj* Beach and 
sons of Crescent Springs spent last 
Sunday afternoon wjfth his cousin, 
Mrs. Hazel Smith and husband, of 
New Haven. 

We are sorry to he ; of the ill- 
ness of Albert Feldha) ?. We pray 
for him a speedy reed ;ry. 

W. B. Stephens vi^ ted H. M. 
Clore over the week-er, i. 

Reuben Jones, ofilyhding was 
the overnight guest of David Wil- 
son one night last week. 

John and Clayton Ryle deliver- 



ed their crop of tobacco to Cov- 
ington, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black and 
Mrs. Hazel Smith assisted then- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. D. Isaacs 
in straightening up after moving 
Friday. 

Sorry to hear of the illness of 
Mrs. Berta Clore. We wish for her 
a speedy recovery. 



BULLITTSVILLE HOMEMAKERS 

The Bullittsville Homemakers' 
club met at the home of Mrs. Al- 
bert Pfalzgraf on January 20. Due 
to a sudden snow storm, few ladies 
ventured out. The several stand- 
ing committees had excellent re- 
ports to give. 

Mrs. Albert Stevens delighted her 
listeners with a most interesting 
talk on "Wllkie's One World." 

Plans were made for a "paper 
drive" in our community. 

Miss Gillaspie announced the 
major lesson for February as "Ex- 
termination of Household Pests." 

Mrs. Huey Aylor was appointed 
chairman of "Live-at-Home" pro- 
gram. After a delightful seasonal 
lunch, Mrs. Parker Hollis present- 
ed the lesson for this meeting, 



"Patching and Mending." She dis- 
played many expert samples of the 
many ways to do these simple, but 
important tasks. 

Our next meeting will be held at 
the home of Mrs. Anna Mikkelsen. 



KEEP ON 



^r^///f^ 



with WAR BONDS 



Your 
Eyes 



W W 



and your children's eyes de- 
serve my expert service. See 
me for better vision and real 



eye comfort. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 




As administrator of the estate of Katherine 
Geisler, deceased, I will offer at Public Auc- 
tion at the property in Petersburg, Ky., on 

SAT., FEB. 12 

At 12:00 (CWT) 

The following: Household and kitchen furni- 
ture, some antiques; a few carpenter tools, and, 
many other articles too numerous to mention. 

TERMS— CASH 

L. S. CHAMBERS, Admr. 

JEORHE RISER. Auction* 



COL. GEORGE RISER, Auctioneer. 



- 



WISG SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT AUCTION ON 
THE IksT BEND ROAD, FOUR MILES SOUTH OF BUR- 
LINGTON, on 



THURSDAY 



AT 



9 

:00 (CWT) 



.* 






FARMING IMPLEMENTS— McCormick mowing machine, hay 
rake, h3y bed, wagon, sled, disc harrow, smoothing harrow, hill- 
side plow, two-horse jumper, Oliver breaking plow, single shovel 
plow, 4 double shovel plows, 5-shovel cultivator, 14-tooth culti- 
vator, riding cultivator good as new, road scraper, fencing ma- 
chine a id wire stretcher, jack screw, pitchforks, hoes, shovels, 
rock ha nmers, crosscut saw, 2 sets of leather work harness, 
axes, st&lyards, wheelbarrow, plow harness, 2 new horse collars, 
check lMes, crowbar, hog killing outfit complete, 2 lard kettles, 
lard prefs and sausage mill, 3 milk cans, buckets, 1 milk separ- 
ator, 12 ft. log chain, and various other small tools. 
Four oi* 5 tons of alfalfa hay. Model A Ford Sedan, v good rubber 

LIVESJtOCR— 1 black mare, ten years old, 1300 lbs; one 3-year- 
old bay mare, weigh 1250 lbs; 5 milch cows, Shorthorn, one with 
calf by tqr side, 3 to freshen within 30 days, one in May. 
HOUSJtEtOLD GOODS— Cole Hot Blast heater; wood heater; 
two betfsteads; one bureau; washstand; two small tables; 3 
kitchemtables; set bed springs, practically new; chairs; wash- 
ing madhine; wash bench with wringer, good condition; 1 cedar 
hand churn; 1 side-icer ice box; 2 good mattresses; 1 Bissell 
carpet sweeper; 1 table-style Aladdin lamp with parchment 
shade; J old glass lamps; stone jars, various siz£s; pans and iron 
pots; lot of Mason fruit jars with caps; odd lot" of dishes, some 
an iquef i other articles too numerous to mention. 
* TERMS— CASH 



. KELLY 



COL. W0RTHINGT0N ft COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auets. • LUCIAN BRADFORD, Clerk 



'• 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



' 



•" 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Mrs. Madge ^Campbell spent last 
Thursday afternoon with 
Irene Green. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker and 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wilson were 
supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Blaker and family, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter Jean were supper guests 
Saturday of Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Craddock and family. 

Mrs. Evelyn Wilson returned 
Tuesday night after spending. | a 
few days with her husband Sea- 
man 2-C Lawrence Wilson at Pitts- 
burg, Perm. > 

Wedding bells will be bringing 
for Lieut. Lorraine Reimer nurse, 
who is home on leave and Cpl. 
Walter Melcin on furlough, this 
week. Lieut. Reimer is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reimer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Clark. and 






Notice Of Bids 



daughter were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Campbell and 
son. 

-Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson and 
daughters and M?«v Evelyn Wilson 
spent Sunday' -with Mr. and Mrs. 
Franklin Ryle and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour and 
daughters called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Norman Craddock and family, 
Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Mae Sams and family mov- 
ed Saturday to Indiana. We re- 
gret to lose them from our midst. 



HEBRON 



Notice is hereby given that bids 
will be received by the Board of 
the Hopeful Lutheran Church; for 
a Sexton for the Hopeful Lutheran 
Cemetery for the year 1944. 

Bids must be in the hands of IB. noon 
J. Kelly, not later than February f 
12, 1944. 

The Council reserves the right to 
reject any an d all bids. 
HOPEFUL LUTHERAN COUNCIL. 



POINT PLEASANT 

Mrs. Eva McGlasson and Miss 
Mabel Dolwick are spending a few 
days with Mr. and Mrs. Adam Dol- 
wick and children. 

Mrs. Geo. Wernz is guest of her 
daughter,. Mrs. Carl Bell, of Brom- 
ley for a few days. 

Mrs. Josie Garnett, Mrs. Emma 
Wern%.Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wernz, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wernz and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Beil 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
McGlasson, Jr., and son and Mr. 
and Mrs: Adam Wernz were Sun- 
day evening guests of Mr. and Mrs, 
Fred Garriett, of Constance. 

Adam Dolwick called on Mr. and 
MF S - Geo, Wernz, Sunday after- 



-., 



Pfc. Charles N. Benson was re- 
moved to the Ft. Thomas military 
hospital Tuesday suffering with 
strep throat and infected ear. 



jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I SERVICE for 25 YEARS 

i Our REPUTATION is 

your PROTECTION 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Poston had 
for their guests Saturday night, 
Paul Rimmer, student at Hamma 
Divinity School of Springfield, O., 
who delivered an interesting serm- 
on at the Lutheran Church Sun- 
day morning in the absence of the 
pastor Rev. H. M. Hauter. 

Earl Aylor is back at the garage, 
after a week's illness. 

Mrs. Omer Dolwick left Tuesday 
for a visit with her husband in 
Mississippi. /■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Thlrs (nee 
Alice Katherine Tupman) are the 
proud parents of a daughter, born 
Saturday, Feb. 4th at the hospital: 

Mrs. Chester Goodridge assemb- 
led a group of relatives Wednesday 
in honor of the birthday of her 
mother, Mrs. H. L. McGlasson. 
Other guests were Mis. Robert 
Hafer and daughter and Mrs. L. C. 
McGlasson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Swab enter- 
tained Sunday Mr. and Mrs. 
Thornton Watts and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Richard Snelling and 
family, Mrs. Ida Watts and daugh- 
ter Dorothy and Mrs. Hallie Herb- 
streit and son Donald. 

Mrs. W. W. Goodridge enter- 
tained a group of relatives and 
friends Thursday night in honor 
of the 80th birthday of Mr. Good- 
ridge. Guests were Mr. and Mrs. 
H. L. McGlasson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Hafer and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. McGlasson and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Goodridge, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert 
Dolwick and daughter and Mr. and 
i§ Mrs. Chester Goodridge and son, 
| Billy Louis. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Goodridge 
had for their guests Sunday, Mr., 
and Mrs. Paul Poston and daugh- 
ter Jean Elizabeth and Paul Rim- 
mer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H. Riley, of 



R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY 



| 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 
^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii^ 



211 



>ii 




MIIK PRODUCERS WANTED 

I ' HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

CALL COLONIAL 0694 
Or Call at 



HANNEKEN DAIRY COMPANY 

624 SCOTT BLVD. COVINGTON, KY. 



USED CAR BARGAINS 

1937 FORD COACH ....? J 

1937 DeSOTO SEDAN 

1937 STUDEBAKER SEDAN „ 



.. 



1937 
1937 
1937 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1936 



.$325 
.$375 
.$350 

DODGE COACH '. $350 

OLDSMOBILE ...:.; $375 

(Two) STUDEBAKER COUPES $350 

CHYSLER SEDAN $295 

WILLYS SEDAN $325 

HUDSON SEDAN $695 

CADILLAC $325 



1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 







......... 



...$295 

.$275 
.$245 



1936 LINCOLN ZEPHR (4-door) ... 

1936 CHEVROLET COUPE ..* 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN {.? 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. fcovington COlonial 3884 



Louisville were week-end guests of 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. W. 
Riley. 

Mr. and Mr. s. -Chas. Utzinger, of 
North Bend spent Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Botts. 

Mrs. Russell Hodge entertained 
the Missionary society of the Bul- 
littsville Christian Church, Satur- 
day. V 

Mrs. Everett Hays spent Wed- 
nesday with Mrs. Mary Hays, of 
HJ11 Top. 

Russell Conrad, who is in the 
Navy was home for a few days and 
attended church here Sunday. 



SYCAMORE VALLEY 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

New James 

Theatre 

Beginning Sept. 25th One Show 

Each and Every Night at 7:30 

Central War Time. Sunday 

Matinee at 2:30 Central 

War Time 

BARGAIN NIGHTS MONDAY and 

THURSDAY 



Robert Paige, Anne Gwynee, and 
Noah Beery, Jr., in 

FRONTIER BADMEN 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH 



Sonja Henie, Jack Oakie, Cesar 
Romero, Carole Landis, in 

WINTERTIME 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 11 & 12 



Richard Quine, Anne Gwynne, in 

WE'VE NEVER 
BEEN LICKED 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13TH 



Charles Coburn, Isobel Elsom, in 

MY KINGDOM 
FOR A COOK 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH 



Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, in 

DANCING MASTERS 

TUES. & WED., FEBRUARY 15-16 

miiiiimiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiii' 



U.S. APPROVED BLOOD TESTED 



For 
100 



CHICKS- $13.25 

Bred To Lay Also UBIKO Starter 

* 

9 Ft. x 100 Ft. Tobacco Canvas *....$ 7.25 

Mineral Feeders, Wood Construction $ 9.60 

Electric Fence Controllers $11.95 

Galvanized Fountains, 5 gallon $ 2.30 

Flock" Feeders, Wood Construction $ 3.29^ 

Heavy Duty Wood Wheel Wagons $96.00 

_ <. 

Complete Assortment GARDEN SEEDS and GARDEN 
VIGORO FERTILIZER 

SOUS, ROEBl'CK MB CO 






13 West Seventh Street Covington 

SEARS FARM STORE 



720 Washington Street 






3 



Covington 



Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin "and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Clar- 
ence Earl Easton and family were 
calling on Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Eas- 
ton, Tuesday night. % 

Mr. and Mrs. ' Elwood Bishop 
spent Sunday -with relatives in In- 
dependence. 

Newton Sullivan spent Saturday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Easton. 

We regret to lose Mr. and Mrs. 
WiU -Brown and family and Mr. 
and Mrs. L. L. Tucker and fam- 
ily from our community. v 

Rex Berkshire, Ida Mae Fleek 
and Buddy Finn Were calling on 
Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Easton, Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Will Brown and family moved 
to Indiana, last Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Bishop were 
calling on Mr. and Mrs. Jake Fleek 
and family, Sunday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Powders and 
family have moved back to Woolp- 

Lb * 

er. 

Ida Mae Fleek and Wanda Bis- 
hop were shopping in town Friday. 

We are glad to receive word that 
Johnny Scudder is able to be up 
after being in the hopsital for two 
week at Great Lakes, HI. 



PANNELS BOTTOM 



Mrs. Chester Goodridge' of Heb- 
ron spent one day last week with 
her aunt, Miss Laura McGlasson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Dolwick 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Goodridge. 

Mrs. Laura Crisler has returned 
to Petersburg after spending sev- 
eral weeks with her. daughter, Mrs. 
Pearl McGlasson. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Dye and Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Smith and fam- 
ily spent Sunday afternoon and 
evening with Mr. and Mrs. John 
Waldeck of Sayler Park,~0. 

Mrs. Grace Dolwick entertained 
the Constance Homemakers last 
Wednesday. 

Mr. arid Mrs. Jack Sprague and 
son were calling on Mr. and Mrs. 
James Dye last Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl McGlasson en- 
tertained a few. , of their friends 
with a card party last Saturday, 
evening. 

Mrs. John L. Hankins and Mrs. 
Geo. Allen Darby and baby spent 
Wednesday with Mrs. J. P. Dolwick. 

Mrs. R. S. Sprague and son 
Stanley Wayne are with her hus- 
band, First Sergeant R. S. Sprague, 
who is stationed at Blackstone Ya. 

Mrs. Owen Sprague and children 
left for Wisconsin, Saturday to 
spend a few weeks with her hus- 
band, who is working on a govern- 
ment project there. 



PRICE PI 



IKE 



I 



Clem Kendall ca"ed on Mrs, 
Amanda Tanner, Sur i$y morning: 

Miss Jpyce Smith and George 
Hartman, Jr., attend /d/ the dance 
at Lloyd, Friday nigift. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cly^e Anderson 
and daughter attended the birth- 
day supper Saturday night at Mr. 
and Mrs. Carl Ander »Cs in honor 
of their daughter, A jpo, who cele- 
brated her 21st birthday. 

Pvt. Leo Boh is spending a ten- 
day furlough with his .parents and 
friends. > 

Mi-vana Mrs. Williwn Gross call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Louis Boh one 
night last week. | 

Mrs. Gertrude Hon is spending 
a few days with hev parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Boh and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van Elliott, Jr., and 
children spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Van Elliott, Sr. 

Van Elliott is the proud owner of 
a new milk cooler and milk cart. 

Sunday afternoon guests of Mrs. 
Amanda Tanner were Mr. and Mrs. 
August Dringenberg. 

Several from ttfis." neighborhood 
have started their spring plowing. 

Mrs. Herman Blaker called on 
the Speagle family .Sunday after- 
noon. . ' 

Friday night guest* of the Elliott 



family were Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Parson and family. 

J-ess England and family are liv- 
uS'-with net rakher. Mrs. Easton. 

George Cook is ill with a cold. 
We wish him a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and- Mrs. Lawrence Siene 
and daughter spent one day last 
week in Covington. 

Louis Boh and family spent last 



Thursday in town, 

Mr. and Mrs. George Ramler and 
family, of Silver Lake Farm spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Smith and children. 

Walter Arnold is spending ten 
days with his daughter of Detroit, 
Mich. _ 



RECORDER 1 YEAR $1.50 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



U. S. War Department 

Certification of Authority 

AG 095 Expires Aug. 10, 

1945 




NEEDS 
FOR 

Service 
men 

FURLOUGH BAGS 

ROLL KITS - APRON KITS 

SHOE SHINE KITS 

SEWING KITS 

MONEY BELTS 

GARRISON CAPS 

OVERSEAS CAPS 

TIES - BELTS - SWEATERS 

CHEVRONS - COLLAR ENSIGNIA 

SHOULDER PATCHES 

SERVICE RIBBONS 

GARRISON BELTS 

EF-KO 

■ ' • . — 

Army Store 

508 MADISON AVE. 

Near 5th QOVINGTON Near 5th 



RUPTURE 

E. J. MEINHARDI, widely known 
Shield Specialist of Chicago, will 
again be in Cincinnati Ohio, at the 
Gibson Hotel, for Si: Days begin- 
ning Saturday, Feb. L.,th to Thurs- 
day, Feb. 17th Inclusive, from 1 F. 
M. to 4 P. M. and 6 t'iM. to 8 P. M. 
daily. 

MR. MEINHARDL says: The 
Meinhardi Shield is a tremendous 
improvement — well kftown for pro- 
ducing immediate results. It pre- 
vents the Rupture from protruding 
in 10 days on the average— regard- 
less pf size or location at Rupture 
and no matter how hard ybu work 
or strain. It has no" leg straps. 
(No Surgery or Injection Treat- 
ments used.) Mr. Meinhardi has 
been coming here for ! - i a5 years. He 
has thousands of satisfied, Custom- 
ers. Ask your neighbors. 

Caution: If negle* «d— Rupture 
may cause weakne ;, backache, 
constipation, nervousV ,es,s stomach 
pains, etc., or suddefit death from 
strangulation. 

Men having large Ruptures 
which have returned after Surgical 
Operations or Injection Treatments 
are also invited. Wh»n all others 
fail— see MEINHARDI . He will be 
pleased to demonstrat to you priv- 
ately without charge^, (Only men 
invited.) White onlyw lt-pd 

_J5- 



WHEN IN TOWN BUY AT X A. RAXJMGARTNER 
LOWEST PRICES ON 

RUGS, MATTRESSES and FURNITURE 

v COME IN AND SEE 



50-Lb. 

All Cotton 

MATTRESS 

$7.95 

50-Lb. 

All Felt 

MATTRESS 

$104)8 



9x12 Felt Base Rocs . . . $3.50 

12x12 Armstrong Rugs.. $8.95 

9x12 32 Ox. Waffle 

Rug Pad $5.95 

HEAVY WEIGHT 

GOLD SEAL yd. 49c 



MAPLE BABY CRIB 



.$13.98 



Felt 

Day Bed 

MATTRESS 

$8.95 

• 

Baby Crib 
MATTRESS 

$3.98 






Bedroom, Living room, studio couches, chairs, 
rockers, occasional pieces and many odd pieces. 

. ] Don't Forget The Address 

1046 MADISON AT 11TH, COVINGTON, KY. 



WZMSHXHZHZHXHXHIMZHXHXHSHZHXHZHZHSHZHZHZHXHIHSHZHEH^ 

I — REGISTERED JERSEYS- § 

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JERSEY BREEDERS have made the Registration Certificate of 
all Jersey bulls born after January 1, 1942 more significant by 
the adoption of Selective Registration. 'This program has been 
acclaimed from Coast to -Coast as the greatest forward step in 
breed movement ever pioneered by any breed association. 
Selective Registration attempts to insure your investment ' in 
purchasing a Jersey Bull calf. It is a big, step in protecting 
the future of your investment in Jerseys. 

S. WHITEHOUSE DUNLAP-FARM ! 



Herd T. B. and Bang Tested 



L. C. FISH, Herdsman, 

Richwood, Kentucky U. S. 25 



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NOTICE ! 

DEALERS AND ROOjJtfNG HOUSE 
OWNERS^ * 
20,000 PIECES. OF 
CHINAWARE AND GLASSWARE 

AS LOW AS 2 for 5c 

Enamelware, pots f>nd pans. 
Sold below factojjy cost. 

SAVINGS UP TO 50% 
PAT'S CHINA STORE 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 



(XHXNXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXmMXHXHXHXHXNXHXHXHXHXMXHXHXIft 



Quick Dry Enamel 
Guaranteed House Pa! 



^..$L 
ifat $1.1 



98 Gal. 
69 Gal. 



Red Roof Paint '.I . .$1.49 Gal.- 

Aluminum Paint ."Trig. .$4.95 Gal. 
Black Roof Coating XL . . .49c Gal. 

In 5-Gallon $£its 
Kern tone .v. .$2.98 Gal. 

GORDON SUPPLY GO. 

736 MADISON 



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REMEMBER 
HIM or HER 



with a 

VALENTINE 

GIFT 

from 






* 



1 COVINGTON | 




Madison at 7tb ■ Covington, Ky 






CHICKS 



% < ' 



;- 



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WHITE PLYMO^ffH ROCKS 
BARRED PLYM<AJTH ROCKS 
S. C. RHODE ISyLND REDS 
R. C. WHITE WYANDOTTES 
NEW HAMPSHIRE REDS 
S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 









NON-SEXED 
BLOODTESTED STOCK 



PER 
100 



We Sell DR. SALSBURY'S Poultry Remedies 
Poultry Feeders, Water Founts, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

HEmlock 9168 
Open Sundays Till Noon 



512 PIKE ST 
COVINGTO* KY. 

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THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 







lllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

Seen And Heard Artiund 

1 . The County Seat 

Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

Mr. and Mrs. William Jarrell and 
Mark Benson were callers at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Ben- 
son and family, Sunday afternoon, 

Relatives from •fcfoveihnati-' were 
Sunday guests of Mrs. Levhiat Kirk? 
Patrick and family. 

jMrs,, Jajnes Bullock, of Hebron, 
spent £pwday afternoon with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Cress. 

Charley Kippler on Garrison, re- 
cently purchased the Otto Souther 
farm. Mr. Kippler plans to move 
to his new home immediately. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rosoce Akin and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. C..E. 
Easton and family were dinner 
guests last Tuesday evening of Mr. 
and Mrs. Eddie Easton. 

Voel Gray was removed to Christ 
Hospital last Thursday afternoon, 
suffering from an attack of pneu- 
monia. 

Mrs. William Huey spent the 
week-end with her husband, who 
is located at Camp Perry, Va., with 
the Seabees. 

Pfc. Charles Benson, who is lo- 
cated in California with the U. S. 
Marines, spent several days this 
week with his wife and daughter 
and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
D. Benson % and family. 

Miss Lynette Jarrell, of Walton, 
c pent several days last week with' 
Mr. and Mrs-* Frank Maurer an£ 
daughter, Joy. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Clore and 



NOW . . . 

The nearest things to 

naturally curley hair 

COLD WAVE PERMANENT 

Senational No-Heat Method 

of Permanent $4 t\ M 

Waving £ U 

Other Permanents $4.00 up 

I AROSE 

Li BEAUTY SALON b 

400 Djxie H'way, Erlanger, Ky. 

Phone Erl. 6252 
Edith Amburgey, Prop. 



family, of Cincinnati, were guests 
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Clore and family. 

MJss Dorothy Gaines spent Sun- 
day! wMt Mistf Carolyn Cropper. 
- , Mrs. Mary. Clore returned last 
week from Florida, where she has 
been visiting m lor the past few 
weeks. 

Cpl. Leslie McMullen is spend- 
ing a furlough with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie McMullen. 

Pf_c. Neil Kin g is spending a few 
day?*?ufWBtti with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. King. 

Mrs. Walter Brown taught \ at 
school last week in the absence of 
Miss Mildred Siekman, who was ill 
with yellow jaundice. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ryle and fam- 
ily entertained a group of friends 
Saturday evening. Guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Easton and 
•family, Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin 
and daughter, George Cook and 
Miss Louise Mahorney. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles (Bud) Sul- 
livan (nee Marorie Bradford) are 
rejoicing over the arrival of a baby 
boy, born Thursday, Feb. 3rd at 
Booth Hospital. 

Cpl. Alpha Lee Rogers, of Barks- 
dale Field, La., is enjoying a fur- 
lough with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Rogers. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Hook, of 
Cincinnati,' b.^spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rogers 
and family. 

Miss Carolyn Cropper and Miss 
Dorothy Gaines were dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rogers and 
family, Saturday evening. 

Elby Dringenburg, well known 
Florence man is seriously ill at 
Booth Hospital, suffering from a 
ruptured appendix. 

Pfc. Marvin Rouse Porter, of 
Boca Raton Field, Fla., is spending 
a few days' furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. George Porter. 

Joel Gray, who was removed to 
Christ Hospital, last Thursday is 
reported to be improving nicely 
from an attack of pneumonia. 

Pfc. Charles- N. Benson, of the U, 



S. Marines, Oceanside, Calif., is 
spending a few days' furlough with 
his wife and baby daughter and 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.T3. 
BenSon and family. 

Billy Eddlns, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jeff Eddins has returned home and 
is reported to be doing nicely, after 
having a peanut removed from his 
lung at Children's Hospital, Cin- 
cinnati. 



HAMILTON 



Mrs. Bertha Allphin was in 
Covington last Tuesday. 

Mrs. Georgia Ryle entertained 
the Methodist Ladies' Aid last 
Thursday. A good number of 
members and several visitors en- 
joyed the day. 

Friends in this community were 
sorry to hear of the sudden death 
of Mrs. Freda Brown. We extend 
,our sympathy to her loved ones. 

Sgt. Paul Shields stationed in 
Georgia was enjoying a three-day 
furlough among relatives and 
friends last week. " 

Garland Huff ..and family were 
the guests of his parents, Sunday. 

Mrs. Jessie' 'Allphin is the guest 
of her son and family. 

The bridal shower given in hon- 
or Mrs. Wayne Lovelace, Wednes- 
day evening at the home of Mrs. 
Everett Jones was well attended 
and the bride received many nice 
gifts. 

Mrs. Tom Huff, son and family 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Frank Se- 
bree, Sunday afternoon. 

Miss Ruth Jane Jones spent the 
week-end with her parents. 

The sale at the late Albert 
Shields property, Saturday Was well 
attended. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mollis and son 
spent the week-end at their camp. 

Mrs. R. R. Robbins, of Indiana, 
spent several days with Mr. and 
Mrs. Becknell and called on other 
friends last week. 

Miss Wilma Ruth Huff spent 
Wednesday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Claude Black. 

Tom Huff made a business trip 
to Burlington Monday. 



«ZNXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXNXN»«HXMXHZNSNSHXHXHSHXHXHS|| 

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WAR BONDS 



■ 

Make that subscription to the, Fourth War Bond 
Drive as soon as possible. 

The soldiers who are protecting us need your sup- 
port and Uncle Sam is generous enough to pay you 
interest for your money and pay back the princip- 
al at maturity. 

You can not afford not to subscribe to the limit. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 



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* BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
g Capital $50,000.00 • Surplus $100,006.00 

MXHXHEHSHXHXHSHXMXHSHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXMXHXHXHXHXHXK 




The Home Store 



iiiiiiuiiiiudiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiitiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiii 

DR. HESS PTZ PELLETS for Sheep, Hogs and Cattle ea. 6c 

PTZ POWDER j. 

PTZ POWDER 



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VANILLA WAFER COOKIES pound 25c 



1 lb. $1.60 
.5 lb. 7.50 



GINGER SNAPS ...I pound 15c 



::: 



FIG .BARS pound 25c 

DEVIL DELIGHT : . pound 27c 

NUT CREME • pound 35c 

ZESTA CRACKERS pound 18c 

SALTINE CRACKERS . . .< pound 18c 

KRISPIE CRACKERS pound 18c 

HONEY GRAHAM CRACKERS : .pound 19c 

STAFFORD'S ORIGINAL LONG LEAF GOLDEN 

BURLEY TOBACCO SEED, V 2 oz. 75c 1 oz. $1.50 

WARNER'S LARGE LEAF GOLDEN BURLEY 

TOBACCO SEED, ' j oz. 75c 1 Oz| $1.50 

YELLOW STEM TWIST BUD TOBACCO SEED, y 2 oz 75c; 1 oz 1.50 
BELL'S WHITE BURLEY TOBACCO SEED, y 2 oz. 75c; 1 oz. 1.50 
Our plantbed fertilizer and grass seed will arrive about February 
1. See us for your spring requirements. 



BIG BONE 

This community is saddened by 
the death of Mrs. William Brown. 

Mrs. Russell Miller, Jr., spent £ 
few days with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Cecil Williamson. 

The Methodist Society met with, 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ryle, Thursday. 

Mrs. Garfield Hamilton visited 
her mother in Covington, Satur- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hamilton 
moved from Mrs. Anna Cleek Mc- 
Cabe's place to the Allen place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Miller en- 
tertained for lunch Sunday, a few 
friends, it being Lucill's birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kite spent the 
day Sunday with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. John J. Hamilton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jones, of Er- 
langer were at church here, Sun- 
day. 



, UNION 

Mrs. Mary Gaines Berkshire and 
Master Wayne B. Keim were out 
from Covington, Sunday afternoon 
for a briervisit with Mrs. Ben S. 
Houston. 

Mrs. Ed Grater was hostess to her 
Bridge Club at her lovely home 
"Hill Top Farm" Thursday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd M. Jones 
stopped over Wednesday enroute 
from Louisville to Richmond for 
the day with Mr. and Mrs. Roberts. 
Mr. Jones will report at Ft. Thomas 
Tuesday, February 8th for induc- 
tion into the U. S. Army. 

Rev. R. H. Carter, Mrs. Carter, of 
Florence, Mrs. B. L. Norman and 
Milton A. Wilmesherr were dinner 
guests Saturday night of Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy Butler. 

Rev. Edwin Rock, of Louisville 
was guest speaker Sunday evening 
at the Presbyterian Church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Grater, Mrs. Mary 
Grater and Mrs. Benny Setters 
were received into the church at 
this service. 

Mrs. Harold Gatewood was ill at 
her home, last week with flu. 

Miss Elizabeth Lowry, B. C. R. C, 
was calling on friends in the vill- 
age Wednesday. 

Pvt. Harry Wilbur Craddock ar- 
rived here Wednesday from Camp 
Stuart, Ga., for a furlough with his 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Heizer 
left Saturday night for extended 
vacation in Miami, Fla. 

New Haven's P.-T- A. held its 
regular monthly meeting Tuesday 
night in the school auditorium. An 
excellent crowd attended and con- 
sidered important business 



DEVO^I 



Miss Katherine n Holzworth 
called on Mrs. Rose >ukenheimer, 
of Covington, Tuesda > night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesfe Scott called 
on his parents, Mr. a£l Mrs. W. W. 
Scott, of Gallatin Coflfcty, Tuesday 
afternoon. '* 

Mrs. Frank Bresser has been ill 
at her home for the past week. We 
wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Elmer Carpenter was in 
Erlanger, Thursday afternoon 
having several teeth treated. 
- Paa Carpenter, jMrs. Elmer 
Carpenter and Mrs. James Carp- 
enter were in Cincinnati, Friday 
afternoon dn business. 

George Kees of the armed forces 
■is now at his home with an honor- 
able discharge. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Wood and 
family 'called on his uncle, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Wood, Saturday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe tonnell and 
daughters of Mornin "View called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Eln 
and family, Sunday 

Mr. and Mrs. Hen: 
and daughter, JameS 
Snow called on Mr. and Mrs 
Watkins, of Latonia, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
were business callers in Burling- 
ton, Friday afternoon., 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Cardosi 
celebrated their sixth wedding an- 
niversary on Saturday, February 5. 






Coxswain William Sullivan of 
the U. S. , Merchant Marine Is 
visiting his parents Mr., and Mrs. 
Cad Sullivan of near Burlington. 
Bill no doubt will have many in- 
teresting stories to relate of his 
travels. 




When you were a kid, did 
you always pester to "go 
along" on every ride? And 
now, do you get a kick out of 
handling the wheel like a man? 
Women with mechanical abil- 
ity are needed in the WAC at 
once. Other skills are . needed 
too. And untrained women can 
learn skills that will be useful 
all their lives. 239 types of 
Army jobs need Wacs to fill 
them. 

Get full details at the near- 
est U. S. Army Recruiting Sta- 
tion (your local post office will 
give you the address). Or write: 
The Adjutant General, Room 
4415, Munitions Building, 
Washington, D. C. 



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Carpenter 

Hoizwortti 
and Benta 
Lee 



in g ton. Mrs. Souder has left for 
Ft. Smith, Ark., to be near her hus- 
band, who is stationed at Camp 
Chaffee. . . 

Arnie Lykinsa and family moved 
last week from J. W, Conley's farm 
to that of Mr. Johnson on Green. 
Road, near Walton. 

The New Haven Homemakers' 
Club sponsored a bake sale at the 
drug store in Florence, Jan. 22 and 
cleared about $16.00. 

Mrs. Lon WJlson, Mrs. Leslie 
Moore, Mrs. Howard Moore and 
little son visited Mr. and , Mrs. 
Everett Wolfe, of near Petersbirg, 
Wednesday. 

Mrs. Henry Story and daughters, 
of Covington, visited Mr arid Mrs. 
William Wilson, of Hill Top Service 
Station, Saturday. 

Mrs. Geo. Baker and sons, G. W. 
and Johnnie and Miss Norma Jean 
Stevenson left | for Florida - Isat 
week. 

WccKS. 

This community was shocked and 
saddened by the sudden death of 
Mrs. Freida Brown, Saturday. She 



leaves many friends here who sym- 
pathize deeply with the husband 
and children in their sad loss. 

Rev. Shirley Spahr has resigned 
as pastor of the* local Baptist 
Church as he has accepted' the 
pastorate of the First Baptist 
Church at Cadiz. He and his «wife 
have many friends here, who re- 
gret to see them leave. 



IN LOVING MEMORY 

Of my mother, Mrs. Carrie M. 
Gross, who passed away February 
10, 1943-: i 
The echo of her voice, her eyes, her 

anile, 
Just as they were, are with us all 

the while; *^ 

Even though beyond the gate, 
Our loved one has found happiness 

and rest, . T 

There is comfort in, the thought, 
That a loving God knows best. 
They expect to stay severaif' Sadly missed by her husband, 

daughter, son-in-law and grand- 
children. 

Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHU: 

= WASHERS REPAIRED I 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE = 






MAYTAG OIL 



WM. KAGEDORN 

| 856 Dixie Highway * Erlanger, Ky. 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiii? 



KRAUT, 32 oz. can, no points each 20c 

PINEAPPLE, No. Zy-i can, 36 points .each 28c 

PINEAPPLE, No. 2 can, 30 points 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE, 1 qt., 14 oz. no points.... 

TOMATO JUICE* 46 oz.. 6 points... .each 25c 

PLUMS, No. %Vi can, 15 points . .each 20c 

PEACHES, No. 2% can 27 points .each 27c 

PEANUT BUTTER, pt. size each 35c 



. . .each 25c 
. . . each 35c 



47-IN. 12-IN STAY 9 AND 11 FIELD FENCE tod 55c 

26-IN. MED. WEIGHT 6-IN. STAY '...*.. rod 50c 

4-FT. POULTRY FENCE rod 60c 

4-POINT 5-IN BARB WIRE, 100 lb. roll $4.50 



100 LBS. 24% DAIRY $3.15 

100 LBS. 16% DAIRY .„'. .'!...'.. .$2.90 

100 LBS. SHELLED CORN ...^ $2.90 

100 LBS. GROUND WHEAT... $2 90 



WOOD HEATING STOVES $5.50 to $10.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA STOVE, 3-room size $45.00 

COAL BURNING HEATROLA, 4-room size $60.00 

GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



BURLINGTON R. 2 

Glad to report Mrs.- Lou William- 
some is home from the hospital. 

Mrs. Rose Stevens, -'Mr*: Tommy 
Stevens, Bro. and Mis; Sam Ham- 
ilton, Cam White, MrA Dora Wag- 
ner and Mrs. Percy Ry*e were Sun- 
day afternoon callers^ on Mrs. Lou 
Williamson. 

Mrs. Paul Cook ret rned to her 
home in Florence, rad., after a 
week with the Codfc- Williamson 
family. m 

Mrs. Bert Scott and son are 
among the sick. 

Mrs. Joe Brady sHxd daughter 
spent Thursday with Irs. and Mrs. 
Charlie Stephens am sons. 

Charlie Stephens if^spending a 
few days with Mr. ajj^d Mrs. Joe 
Brady at Florence, lad. 

Howard Williamsoj/- spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Sirs. Lou ' Wil- 
liamson. ' J " * 

Mrs. Tommy Stevens and Mrs. 
Rose Stevens called on Miss Julia 
Kruse, Saturday evening. 
. Bro. and Mrs. Hamilton were 
Sunday dinner guestsjiof Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Wolfe, si 

BEAVER l|cK 

I - 

Mrs. S. B. Godbey and Miss Anna 
Belle spent several days recently 
with Mrs. Gertrude Souder at Cov- 

i 



FEBRUARY 



BE WISE -- BUY NOW 

Drastic reductionS'ilf^eveVy department; all fall 
and winter merchandise must clear regardless*. <*f 
former price 



.-•i»r«^»-'- T 



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BUY BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 






You get more for your money when you buy 
"Star Brand," "Poll Parrot/' and "Endicott John- 
son" shoes. We sell better shoes at reasonable 
prices. See our shoes before buying elsewhere. 
Compare quality and price. 



BUY WAR BONDS WITH YOUR SAVINGS! 



MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality" — Tour Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



. 



GOODE'S 

Tobacco Seed 



Worthington's Ky. Experiment Station Certified 
No. 41A and No. 16 White Burley. Root-Rot 
Resistant. 

Chancellor and Duncan's Ky. Experiment Sta- 
tion certified new improved Big White Burley 
No. 16. Root-Rot Resistant. 

- 

Casey's Crossed Tobacco Seed Type No. 1 and 
Twist Bud. Guaranteed to grow. 

m I I 1,1 I IMI^M I !■ Ill ■ 

Warner's Golden Burley, Improved White Bur- 
ley. Recleaned and tested at Ky. Experiment 

Station. 

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Judy's Pride— Tfce Old Reliable. 

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PRICE OF ALL SEED: 
Vi OZ. $75c 1 OZ. $1.50 

GEO. C. GOODE 

23 PIKE ST. 22 W. 7TH ST. 

COVINGTON, KY. 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC 
AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, AT THE FARM LO- 
CATED 1 MILE EAST OF HEBRON, KY., ON STATE ROAD 



20, ON U. 






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AT 1:00 P.M. (CWT) 









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The following: 1 fresh Jersey cow, with 5 weeks old calf; 1 Jer- 
sey cow, freshen in May; 1 aged mare; lot of chickens; Sharp- 
less crearr separator; 3 ten-gallon milk cans; sanitary washing 
tub; elect !c water heater; 3 tons clover hay; some mixed hay; 
Fordson flactor and plows; road wagon and box bed; hay rake; 
sled; breaking plow; potato plow; 2 single shovel plows; double 
shovel plofo -; 1 -horse cultivator; 1 -horse corn drill; 2 smoothing 
harrows ;flisc harrow; cutoff saw; 2 crosscut saws; grindstone; 
lot of second-hand lumber; flour barrels; 8 doz. bushel baskets; 
berry crates; 5 heating stoves; porch swing; gas tank and faucet; 
lot of small tools; lot of household and kitchen furniture; lot 
of other articles too numerous to mention. 



TERMS--CASH 



. 



Wm. G. Wahl, Owner 



EDQAR GOODR. j)GE, Auctioneer 



JOHN CONNER, Clerk 



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 









THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



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llllimiiiiiiiinniiiuiTntiiiirrniirniiiiiiiil 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

lllllllllllllllimilllllillllllliillllllllllllllll! 

James Masters, ASN 35685010, 
312th Engineers' Bn., APO 448, Pt. 
Jackson, S. C, left this week for 
camp after enjoying a eleven-day 
furlough with his mother, Mrs. 
Josie Masters, of Constance. He re- 
ports his Company had recently 
completed maneuvers near Nash- 
ville* Tenn. 

• • • 

Donald Portner, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bruce Fortner of near Bur- 
lington and stationed with the U. 
S. Army in England, is reported to 
be recuperating nicely from an eye 
operation, according to a letter re- 
ceived by his mother, recently. 

; 

Elmer S. Dickey, husband of Mrs. 
Alberta Dickey, Burlington, R. 1, 
began his military training at the 
Transportation Corps Replacement 
Training Center at New Orleans, 
La., last week. 

Private Dickey will receive his 
six weeks of basic military train- 
ing at this Center after which he 
will be reassigned for specialized 
training in the Transportation 
Corps. 

He was inducted at Ft. Thomas, 
Ky., January 6, 1944. 

Prior to his induction he was em- 




Your Valentine Photo 

Keep your image close to him 
in the lonely hours on a far 
away front — send your smil- 
ing Valentine Photograph, 
made in our modern studio. 
Come in today. 

Service Photo Studio 

804 MADISON, COVINGTON 

Studio Hours: 11 a. m. to 

9 t p. m. daily. Sundays 1 to 

5 p. m. 



ployed by the Baltimore & Ohio 

Railroad as machinist helper. 

• • • 

Private William R. Walton, 351- 
28173, Service Battry, 56th F. A. 
Bn.", APO 8, care Postmaster, New 
York, N. Y., writes: 

"Allow me to thank you for all 
the past issues of the Boone Co. 
Recorder that I have received. My 
appreciation is deep for you in the 
splendid way you have been keep- 
ing me and my buddies supplied 
with the news back in good old 
Boone County. 

■"From Northern Ireland, I send 
all the best wishes to you and your 
capable staff, and a hearty hello 
to all my friends back home." 

• • • 

David L. Tanner, Company 385 
A. S. Barrack E. 21, USNT, Samp- 
son, N.' Y., writes: "I am in the 
Navy now and am sending you my 
address so I can receive The Re- 
corder and to let the other boys 
know where I am. ... I am the only 
one from our group who was sent 
to New York. I would like to know 
where they have been stationed. . . 
I will write you a letter when I 
have more time. I like O. K. so 

far." 

• • • 

Robert Stephens, stationed some- 
where in Africa, writes: 

"How is everybody around Bur- 
lington by now? I am doing very 
well I guess and am in the best 
of health. I am still stationed here 
in North Africa. I have been here 
eight months now. I guess eight 
months isn't so long but it has 
seemed like a long time to me. 

"I haven't? seen Paul Clore or 



LANG'S RESTAURANT 
Features Shoppers' 

Lunch 

A special shoppers' lunch 
served each noon at Lang's 
restaurant, 623-625 Madison 
Avenue, Covington, for 25c 
should be of special interest 
to Boone County shop pers. 
OYSTERS ANY STYLE 



4H 



Ralph Cain for two months or 
more. They are out somewhere on 
a job. I think we were pretty lucky 
to get to be in the same regiment. 
If a fellow has someone to talk to 
once in a while that he has known 
all of his life it makes him feel he 
isn't so far from home. 

"Well Pete, I have been receiving 
the paper quite regularly since I 
have been over here, and I really 
do appreciate your sending it to 
me. Most of the time I have a 
little time after mail call that I 
can read letters and the paper. 
When I get the paper I think I read 
every word in it at least once, 
sometimes I read part of it the sec- 
ond time. I don't think anyone 
back home can imagine how much 
the Recorder really means to all of 
us fellows from Boone County. 

T would also 'like to thank all 
my friends for the nice letters and 
cards sent to me at Christmas. I 
would like to answer all the letters 
but I don't have enough time to 
answer all of them. 

"We went on a ten-mile hike 
Thursday night and we had to get 
up at regular time the next morn- 
ing for work. A colored fellow told 
me one day that if a man lived 
through this war he never would 
die. I think he was almost right. 

"Thanks again for The Record- 
er and tell everyone I said hello. 
I hope to be back in Burlington in 
another year. 

"I will have to close now for it 
is about ten thirty and tomorrow 
is another day." 

* • • 

A new recruit at the U. S. Naval 
Training Station, Great Lakes, Ill- 
inois is Harry R. Conrad, 18, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. 

Now undergoing "boot" training, 
he is being indoctrinated into 
Navy Life, and is being instructed 
in Seamanship, military drill, and 
naval procedure. Soon, he will be 
given a series of aptitude tests to 
determine whether he will be sel* 
ected to attend one of the Navy's 
service schools, or will be assigned 
to active duty at sea. 

Upon completion of his recruit 
training, he will be granted a nine- 
day leave. 

* * » 

The following address was sent 



ATTENTION, SHIPMATES 

ALL NAVY, MARINES AND. COAST GUARDSMEN 

Here is your -organization— join the Navy Club of the U. 
S of America. Chartered by an Act of Congress 1940. The 
only National Service Organization exclusive for men who 
have served at sea or who is Honorably Discharged from the 
Service in any way. Meet your shipmates in the local club. 

Write: S- D. HEMPFLING, SENIOR EXECUTIVE OFFICER 
Of Cincinnati, Ohio 
Branch, Constance, Ky. 
Or Club Shipswriter, Navy Club of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Mr. James E. Ferguson No. 1 W. St. Clair St., Cin, 19, Ohio 



I • 



L. 




HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT AUCTlbN ON 
THE FLORENCE AND BURLINGTON PIKE NEAR LIMA- 
BURG 



SAT 






y 







• 







■ 

- 



, AT10:30A.M.(CWT) 

FARM IMPLEMENTS—New 2-horse cultivator; 2-horse corn 
drill with fertilizer compartments; turning plows; tooth, Acme 
and disc harrows; grass seed drill and hand sower; 2 single and 

2 double shovel plows; Dixie plow and other one-horse plows; 
one-horse and two-horse sled; 2 wagons with box bed and hay 
frame; dump wagon; hay tedder; mowing machine; hay rake; 
horse drawn lawn roller; 2-horse field roller; manure spreader; 
triple, double and singletrees; 2 corn shelters; cutting box; hay 
fork, pulleys and rope; hog crates and loading chute; ladders; 
10 V 2 rolls of new barbed wire; 2 Ottawa log saw outfits; 40- 
gal. roofing paint; hand plant setter; tobacco sticks; 2 good 
tarpaulins; platform scales; all necessary hog killing tools, in- 
cluding extra good lard and sausage. mill, two 25-gal. iron ketles, 
one 15-gal. iron kettle; fencing tools and woven wire stretchers; 
lot of carpenter tools and vise; grindstone; motor emery wheel; 
cow chains; lot of burlap sacks; electric cream separator; milk 
cans and buckets; 2 oil tanks; mattox, hoes, shovels, pitchforks, 
bolts, and other small tools. One '.22 rifle. Hay, some baled 
straw, and corn, 

LIVESTOCK— Four cows; 1 extra good Belgian mare; 60 sheep 
to lamb in March. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS— One cook stove; coal hot blast heater; 
circulating heater; 2 gas cook stoves; Perfection, coal oil range; 

3 sanitary folding beds; 3 bedsteads; 2 wash stands; 1 bureau; 
2 grass rugs; child's play pen and crib bed; 1 feather bed; few 
chairs; 12-ft. extension table; small tables; sewing machine; 
wardrobe; victrola and records; 2 swing churns; hand churn; 
lard jars ; odd lot of dishes, pans and iron pots, and other tools 
and articles too numerous to mentoin. 

LUNCH SERVED ON GROUNDS TE 



RJflS— CAS 



H 



MRS. SADIE B. TANNER 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD t COL. W0RTHINGT0N, Aucts. 



L. E. AYL0R, Clerk 



us for publication: Pvt. Roger C. 
Beemon, ASN 36465181, 502nd Engs. 
SLP Co., APO 552, care Postmast- 
er, New York, N. Y. ' The above 
youth is stationed somewhere over- 
seas, i 
* • * 

Pfc. Harold T. Rich 35468783, 
Med. Det. 17th Inf. 1st Bn., U. S. 
Army, APO 7, care Postmaster, San 
Francisco, Calif., writes: 

"It gives me great pleasure to 
write a letter for an issue in 'our 
domestic paper. I want to thank 
you and your fellow employees for 
your kind and efficient work in 
making it possible for us boys who 
are in the armed forces to receive 
news from the home front. 

"I received my first copy of your 
paper dated October 18th since I 
have been in the South Pacific. 
Nine days were required to get It 
here, but taking everything into 
consideration, that was excellent 
time. 

"Thet climate here is very uncom- 
fortable, as it is very hot and dry, 
but when it rains, it pours. 

"I have been in the army seven- 
teen months and I have seen ac- 
tion in the Aluetlons Islands. It 
was cold there, but I enjoyed it 
what time I was there. Right now 
I am enjoying the best of health 
and getting plenty to eat, although 
I'm in the hospital now, but look- 
ing forward to getting out before 
long. 

"I look forward every week to re- 
ceiving news from the folks at 
home and I especially enjoy read- 
ing the section 'Our Boys In The 
Service' because that is where most 
of my friends are. 

"I have been all through the 
North and South Pacific, and there 
are mainy interesting places I 
would like to write' about if I could. 
Maybe I will be stble to write about 
them later. 

"I'm proud to know I'm a citizen 
of the county, and to know Til be 
welcomed along with the other fel- 
lows . returning there in the near 
future. 

"I am somewhere in the Hawai- 
ian Islands, is all the news I can 
give at the present. 

"Well, think I've talked enough 
of your time away, so will close. 
Tell all the Boone County folks 
hello and will see you again some- 
time. I am sending my address 
and will appreciate hearing from 
any if not all of my Boone County 
friends." 

■••'*'. 

Ralph E. Marlow, ASN 35878128 
Co, C, 6th Bn., 2nd Platoon, Camp 
Wheeler, Ga., writes: 

"I have been trying to write you 
since I have been here. Have been 
rather busy so I am getting to it 
now. I receive The Recorder every 
week. I certainly enjoy reading 
all the news from home. Several 
of the boys are here in Wheeler. I 
see some of them, but not often. 
I enjoy reading what the boys have 
to say. 

"I have five more weeks here, 
then will be finished. Hope tChave 
a few days off then. Will try to 
stop and see you and all the fel- 
lows. 

"We have had nice weather thru 
most of our training. 

"Will again thank you for The 
Recorder. Tell all the fellows 

hello." 

* • * 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Pvt, Orville E. 
Hodges, Co. 3 1st IIB, 2nd Platoon, 
Camp Wheeler, Ga.: 

"I thought I would write to you 
and thank you for sending me The 
Recorder. I have received it two 
weeks now and it makes a fellow 
feel good to read about friends 
back home. There are several other 
boys that read it too, for they say 
they like to read the letters that 
boys have sent, from overseas 
especially the one that Aubrey E. 
Knox wrote. I am with them, all 
the way for people back home 
don't know just what a soldier goes 
through in camp and overseas. 

"I don't think it will be long 
until I will be over there for, I have 
six more weeks training, then I 
don't know where they will send 
me, and I don't care, for the soon- 
er we get over there the sooner 
the war will be over. 

'Teople back home complain 
about having to buy War Bonds, 
but I can tell them this, we boys 
in camp buy bonds and at the end 
of the month we have $10.00 or 
$15.00 to .spend and they complain 
if they don't have that much ever 
Saturday night to spend. I think 
we all must help. 

"I want to thank you again for 
the paper, and tell all my friends 
hello. Hoping to see them soon." 



The Recorder and I shall look for- 
ward to hearing the ! latest news 
of those of the m it tyiterest — the 
people of Boone < unty." 

"W. R. Tanner,* if Curtis, Bay 
Md., writes: Jj , 

"Have received^lie ist two ed- 
itions of your paper > pr which I 
wish to express my hanks, and 
also want to commend^ \ou on your 
plan of keeping the ; jrvice front 
well informed on the* >ome front. 
Nothing cheers a ma i away from 
home like news from ( . pme. 

"Wishing you contiL ied success 
in your business." %i 

* * * St 

Wilbur Shinkle, of Mr Bragg, N. 
C, writes: "I have b«n on man- 
euvers in Tennessee for over two 
months. They were rgtfly rugged, 
as it snowed or rairfflt and was 
near zero all the time. We were 
there except for a few^pretty days. 

"Since I, same as alljfhe soldiers 
who receive the Recordfe, enjoy the 
news from Boone Coujrcy, I would 
like for you to change* my address 
to the new one here at Pt. Bragg. 

"I am always thankful to you 
for The Recorder." 

• * • 

The following letterjjwas receiv- 
ed from Carl Rudiciffc, stationed 
with the U. S. Army in* Iran: 

"I suppose you thinkjlt is a long 
time between letters, bi|t neverthe- 
less I'll never forget '■-he people 
back home. The Re order still 
arrives about every twi#- weeks and 
it is just like a bundle of mail from 
home. I even read al^the adver- 
tisements from front t§ back. Of 
course, the most interesting is the 
local news and With O^ir Boys in 
the Service. That is one way we 
can check on some of the friends 
in the service to really find out 
where they are. Although we are 
far away and have beeja for some 
two and one-half year*; we never 
grow tired of the news >rom home. 

"Apparently from wi at I have 
read, Boone County is r yeU. repre- 
sented in every part o} the world, 
and from what I remember about 
all the peace-loving bq;s of the 
County, if it is trouble <fje Axis are 
looking for they are bd^id to find 
it when they meet thW country's 
representatives. - ■ 

"Of course here, we flb still rail 
roading, and I am quiteisure Hitler 
feels the sting of supplies Uncle 
Joe is receiving. The onjy bad part 
is we can't give more, and get this 
mess cleaned up sooner. 

"I have read the Senator's state- 
ments, who vsited this country, and 
it is only fair to say that public 
opinion laughed at them too soon. 

"So much for what is happening 
all over the world, I only hope that 
the people will forget about politic- 
al maters long enough when this 
is over and not let it happen again 
in twenty more years. 

"We had a very nice' Xmas and 
New Years — turkey both days, so 
much better than last year, that I 
believe everyone forgot -they were 
in the army for those two days. 

"I have been "working from four 
in the afternoon till . twelve at 
night. Can't say so much for the 
hours, but there is n6thing else to 
do, and who am I to gripe? 

"Tell everyone hello fdr me and 
I hope to be seeing everyone soon." 

* * * k 

The following is a list -of Boone 
County boys in the service and 
their present addresses: : 

Pfc. Henry H. McMurray, ASN 
35468791, Btry. C, 411 (AAA) Gun 
Bn. APO 9160 care Postmaster, 
New York, N. Y. 

Pvt. Milton E. Garnett, ASN 358- 
81573, C. C. 26th Tng. Bn. MPR, TC 
Box 55, Fort Custer, Mich. 

T/5 Ruther D. Hod?es, 35124546, 
Co. A., 33rd AR. AI > 253, care 
Postmaster, New Yorl N.- Y. 



BELLEVIEW BAPTIST W. M. S. 

The Belleview Baptist W. M. S. 
met at the home of Mrs. Lou Maur- 
er for an all-day meeting February 
2nd. Mr,s. Zora Scott, president 
was in charge and Mrs. Bessie Ryle 
had charge of the program. Sub- 
ject for the day was "Missionary 
Work Through the World." 

Bible Study—Miss Anna Cason. 

Africa — Mrs. Alline Brady. 

Africa After the War — Christena 
Kirtley. 

America — Clara Hensley. 

Arizona — Mary, E. Sandford. 

The Power of God's Word — Helen 
Rogers. 

Loyalty to Christ — Mary Mc- 
Arthur. 

Jesus Must Reign — Florence Mc- 
Arthur. . 

Business — Secretary Mrs. Lou 
Maurer. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Etna McNeely. 

Lunch was served to twenty wo- 
men. 

Next meeting March 1st at the 
church. 

Mary E. Sandford, Pub. Chmn 



A new recruit at the U. S. Naval 
Training Station, Great Lakes, 111., 
is Raymond Setters, 31, Petersburg 
Ky. 

Now undergoing "boot" training 
he is being indoctrinated Into Navy 
life, and is being instructed in Sea- 
manship, military drill, and naval 
procedure. Soon, he will be given 
a series of aptitude tests to deter- 
mine whether he will be selected to 
attend one of the Navy's service 
schools, or will be assigned to ac- 
tive duty at sea. 

Upon completion of. his recruit 
training, he will be granted a nine 

day leave. 

• • • 

x T-5 Lawrence L. Aylor, Hq. Co., 
38th Inf. Div. APO 38, care. Post- 
master, San Francisco, Calif., 
writes: 

"Just a line to inform you of h. 
change of address. We have reach- 
ed our destination safely and the 
trip was most enjoyable. Wish to 
thank you for the past issues of 



Alpha L. Rogers, soi» of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Edward flpgers, Route 
2 Burlington, Ky., w^s given his 
silver gunner's wings and promoted 
to the grade of corporal when he 
completed the flexible gunnery 
course for radio men at the Yuma 
Army Air Field this week. Prior to 
his training in flexible gunnery, 
Corporal Rogers graduated from 
'the Radio Operators and Mechr 
anics School, Sioux Falls, South 
Dakota. He is a graduate of Bur- 
lington High School. 

«H 

, OLD KENTUCKY 
By Frances Richmond 

I was born in Old Kentucky, where 

the sky's a bit more blue! 
The grass a little greener, and 

friends are kind and t^ue. 
I love its hills and valleys, \ts fields 

of waving grain; 
Its meadows where the lanibs play, 

in sunshine or in rain. 

My heart's in Old K ntucky, tho 

my home is far a 1 ly, ] 
It's where my kindred ather, each 

year, just for a da, J 
It!s such a glad reunidft, for all to 

meef£ again, ^ 

Though the absence *ift a few is 

sure to bring us pain. 

I love dear Old Kentucky the state 

that gave me birth! 
It's noted for its friendliness the 

best there is on earth; 
When God made Old- Kentucky, He 

must have loved it too, 
For He gave it more of beauty, 

than anyone else could do. 



TAKE STEPS 

TO BUSINESS 

SUCCESS 



AC 
AD 





OIJjl WANT ADS 

PACK A WALLOP 



POSTED 

All persons are nereoy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: ' 

J. W. Marsh, Woolper Creek, Bur- 
lington, R. 2. 

Robert S. Hood Estate, Constance 
Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
January 9, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 









Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT » 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
47 Dixie Highway -:-| Erlanger, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

WAYNE FEEDS — RED JACKET COAL 

READY MIXED CONCRETE 

CONCRETE BLOCKS 



NOTICE! 



The 1944 dog licenses are now due and every dog 
in Boone County must have a license. The Boone 
County Fiscal Court has instructed the Sheriff 
to collect all dog licenses at once, due to the fact 
that the Live Stock Fund is more than one year 
behind in paying the claims for sheep that' were 
killed by dogs. Please obtain this license at 
once so that you will not have to pay the penalty. 

J. T. WILLIAMS 

SHERIFF OF BOONE COUNTY, KENTUCKY 



A PENNY POST CARD WILL 
SAVE YOU DOLLARS ON 

HELD and GARDEN 

DIXIE BRAND 



~ ■ 





• 



NEW CROP NOW ON SALE 



Begin now planning for the biggest 
farm year in history with tried and 
proven Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds — 
high in germination and purity — 
best all-around results assured. 



PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



mS* nee 1863 
ILL 
AND 
COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 | 

• 24-26 W. 25-29 PIKE ' 

SEVENTH ST. STREET 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



I SINCE 1863 



nee 



r 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 


















THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 



1941 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 7, 1924 



Hebron 

Ralph Jones and wife had as 
guests last Sunday, Melvin Jones, 
wife "and two children. 

Walter Hafer, wife and two 
daughters, spent Sunday with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Hafer. 

East Bend 

Helen Rice entertained a few of 
the young folks with a Rook party 
Saturday night. 

Irene and Wilma Scott visited 
Mildred and Rose Hodges, Satur- 
day night and Sunday. 
Limaburg 

Mrs. May Tanner and son Wil- 
ford spent Sunday with her moth- 
er, Mrs. Sarah Brown. 

J. P. Brothers and wife and 
little daughter and Mr. George 
Griffith and wife, called on Mr.; 



Taylorsport 

Mrs. Anna Goodridge has been 
visiting relatives here the past 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sprague 
and sons spent Sunday with his 
sister and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Mj Chambers and family, of Price 

am. 

Florence 

Mrs. Lou Thompson and Mrs. 
Charles Myers spent Thursday in 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Flora Poer and little daugh- 
ter spent the week-end with her 
parents, George Miller and wife, of 
Price Pike. " 

Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. Charles Aylor spent Friday 
with her sister, Mrs. Matt Rouse, 
of Erlanger. 

Mrs. M. G. Martin and Mrs, John 



and Mrs. Adrian Sorrell one nights Hampton called, on Mrs. Russell 
last week. ^Mitchell, Wednesday evening. 

Francesville Richwood 

Miss Laura Katherine Evans and Wm. Gatewood and family spent 
Mrs: R. S. Wilson are on the sick Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
list this week. Carpenter. , 

Carroll Lee Aylor, grandson of Been Toole and family have 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Aylor, won third moved to Walton. 



prize in a Better Babies contest re- 
cently conducted by the Ohio 
Farmer. 




L 



OUR SERVICE WILL 

enable yon te we quickly, ac- 
curately— effortlessly. 

DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OFFICES WITH 

OTC 

Optician*— Jewelers 

•1S-1I Madlioa Ar»„ C*TlB(t«B 
ilNCB MCT 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

VALLEY 0887 

We pay 'phone charges 

Kentucky Dead Animal 
Disposal Co. 



LOCKLAND, 



OHIO 



North Bend 

Born to Lewis Hodges and wife 
Thursday, Jan. 31, a 13 pound boy 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Fogle are 
the guests of their daughter, Mrs. 
Charles Bowman. 

Union 

Mrs. J. W. C -iswell, of Florence, 
spent Wednesd. jy of last week with 
Mrs. Edith Heofces. 

James HeadjjSnd wife entertain- 
ed A. M. Holtlworth and family, 
Saturday night and Sunday. 
Flickertown 

J. W. White and wife and Mrs. 
Clara Sebree, >'ined with J. H. 
Snyder and wif last Tuesday. 

\jtvon 

Mr. V. P. Ivljrquis left Monday 
marring on a ffbusiness trip to 
Owensboro, Ky. 

Idlewild 
Mrs. Ben S. Houston spent Mon- 
day night in Petersburg with her 
friend, Mrs. B. J'.. Berkshire. 
Gra t R. D. 
Misses Eva an J Marie Rector and 
Russell Loudejft are recovering 
from mumps. # 

Gunpowder 
Mrs. Shelly Tanner spent Friday 
afternoon with Mrs. B. A 4 Floyd. 
Hopeful 
Mrs. Carrie Efston, of Bullitts 
ville visited her tother, Mrs. Annie 
Beentton, Tuesday 

Belfijjview 
Mrs. J. J. Mauser visited her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Andy Cook near Peters- 
burg, last Wednesday. 
Burlington 
Mrs. Agnes Clore, Edward Rice 
and Jack Eddinf who have been 
quite, ill for son time are all im- 
proving. 



HILL TOP 

(Delayed) 

Guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. 
Tanner Sunday afternoon were Mr. 
and Mrs. Rowland from Price Hill, 
Cincinnati. 

Members of Elmer Cummins 
family are ill with intestinal flu. 

Mrs. W. D. Carder and daugh- 
ter Edith called on Mrs. Mike Dye, 
Thursday afternoon. 

Miss Martha Pfalzgraf, of Bul- 
littsville was the guest of Miss 
Helen Rogers for several days last 
week. 

Mrs. Edna Eggleston visited her 
friend, Mrs. Fred Lincke, of Lud- 
low from Wednesday until Satur- 
day. 

Mrs. Maggie Heist, of Constance 
visited Mrs. Barney Turner last 
Thursday. 

Mrs. Harold Schneider donated 
her fourth pint of blood last week 
at the Blood Bank in Newport. 

Fred Vahlsing, of Constance and 
Mrs. Mary C. Gross were the guests 
last Sunday evening of Mr. and 
Mrs. V. W. Heist and family of 
Constance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
Carol Ann spent the week-end with 
relatives at Mt. Olivet. 

Callers during the week of the 
Carder family were Mrs. Robert 
Jenkins of Ft. MitcheU, A. p. Kis- 
sick, of Owingsville, Mrs. Norman 
Herbstreit and little daughter 
Wanda, Mrs. A. D. Hunter, Mrs. H. 
S. Tanner and Mrs. Robert Moore 
and children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Walter and 
little daughter Nancy and Mrs. 
Minnie Clane, of Loveland, Ohio, 





NEGLECT YOUR PKOP&TY 
MAKE REPAIRS -Aw/ 



Sec Us About a New R< 
or Needed Reof Rei 



iirs 



You can't afford to let your home depreciate ior need of • 
dependable, weather-tight roof. We are roofing epooiaHeta, 
prepared to give you prompt eerv io e to use the I /geet-value 
roofinga money can buy— CAREY Asphalt Shingles. Your 



choice of beautiful, non-fading colore. We handlf^ll details. 
No red tape. Call, or come in and see us today. ~ 



•Buy WAR BONDS 
•nd STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumb# Co. 

I. 219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 



hFc-JLi 



M IL 



*3"J3i 



STANDARD FOR OVER < I YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



called on their relatives, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. D. Hunter, Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas vis- 
ited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Lucas of Walton several days last 
week. 

Mrs. Minnie Dolehi was the re- 
cent guest of Mrs. Charles Moore, 
Sr. < 1. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury and 
daughter Carol Ann entertained his 
mother, Mrs. Maude Asbury, of 
Florence and his nephew Kenton 
Hester of Mt. Olivet, Thursday 
night. 

Henry Vahlsing, or Cincinnati, 
spent Sunday with his sister, Mrs. 
Hannah Hetzel and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas and 
Mrs. Edna Eggleston were the Sun- 
day guests of Rev. and Mrs. Helton 
and son, of Hebron. 

Mrs! E. Kenton, of Covington 
spent Thursday with her "mother, 
Mrys. Mary Hays. 

Mrs. Mary C. Gross has been on 
the sick list. 



VERONA 4-H CLUB NEWS 

The Verona 4-H Club met and 
was organized January 31. The 
following officers were elected: 
President, Joyce Ryan; vice presi- 
dent, Delbert Messmer; secretary 
and treasurer, Wanda Brewster; 
club reporter, Marion Arch Waller; 
song and cheer leaders, Joe Cloyd 
Ryan and Sarah Chipman. 

The adult leaders were as' fol- 
lows: Community Club leader, Ed 
Chipman; assistant Community 
Club leader, Mrs. Fred Hamilton. 



Project leaders ^were: Garden, 
Norman Jean Enstn; tobacco, Del- 
belt Messmer. , • "W" 

Adult Leaders:^ Garden, Frejd 
Hamilton; tobacco, Gilbert Brew- 
ster; clothing, 1st jear, Mrs. King; 
second year, Mrs. 'Fred Hamilton; 
third year Mrs. Mel in Wasson. 

Twenty-three me il»ers were en- 
rolled. 

"i— 4- • 



RECIPE OF IE WEEK 

Lucky is the youjpester who at- 
tends a school whtfre the well- 
planned hot lunch is as regular a 
feature of the daily schedule as 
the noon hour itself.; For those not 
so fortunate, it is uft to the home- 
maker to see that a substantial, 
tempting meal is tarried from 
home. In many schools, teachers 
and parents togethejr have work- 
ed out some scheme for re-heating 
jars of soups, chocolate or other 
food brought from rrWe. Milk in 
some form should b 1 a "must" in 
every lunch menu. 

A good lunch giv 
satisfied feeling-, ke 
getting sleepy and 
enables him to do b 

A bulletin, "Lunc 
Children," No. 365; 



the child a 

s him from 

restless, and 

sr work. 

for School 

foods spec- 



Haak of the Kentucky College of 
Agriculture and Home Economics, 
gives menus and recipes for both 
individual and group lunches. 
Copies may be secured free from 
offices of county agricultural or 
home agents, or from the college. 

A packed school lunch menu: 
Fruit-nut bread and butter sand- 
wich, enriched bread and meat 
sandwich, carrot strips, milk (or 
cocoa for re-heating), canned fruit 
or apple, cookies. 

Fruit-Nut Bread: 2 c. white flour, 
2 c. wholewheat flour, y 2 c. brown 
sugar, 1 c. seedless raisins or 
chopped dried fruit; y 2 c. chopped 
nuts, 1 teaspoon salt, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder, 2 eggs, 2 c. milk, 
2 tablespoons melted fat. 

Mix together well the flour, 
sugar, raisins, nuts, salt and bak- 
ing powder. Add milk and melted 
fat to well beaten eggs. Combine 
the two mixtures and stir vigor- 
ously until all the flour is damp- 
ened. Pour into greased pans, al- 



ialists Florence Imlay^and Pearl J. 




Approved. Blood-tested, itarted hicks one, two and 
thrw n%> old. Price, right l>»°/teS&. < *i££i 
FREE CATALOG. Write: MM pitVMATCHKKY 

«r7y«8TropBTHgrmBtr. m jotoh. cpttpckt 



low to stand 15 to 20 minutes, then 
bake in a moderate oven, 350-375 
degrees, for 45 minutes. 



AT FIRST 
SIGN OF A 



GIVE HER . . . 

a permanent entitling her to 
lovely natural looking curls! 
Priced to fit any pocketbook, 
from moderate prices to the 
more luxurious, cold wave. 

Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
Open Evenings 



c 



mdm Cv IsT 



USE 
6** TABLETS. SALVE. NOSE DROPS 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES J] 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 




All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

CARDOSI 

Rear 24 East Fifth St; 
COVINGTON 

Phone Hemlock 8689 
Residence Phone Florence 386 




The 



. 









B WAR LOAN is vow opportunity 
to do something about it! 



If S Time to Take the Offensive. Your government has the men it needs to do 
front lines — great men all! But it doesn't have the money it needs, by a long way. Th! 
And the immediate task is the Fourth War Loan — Your chance to take die offensive not on| 
of the men who are fighting and dying for you and your loved ones, but also in support 
future! * 



job in the 

your job! 

in support 

your own 



What are you going to do about a wornout tractor, about repairing fences and buildings, about 
replacing depreciated machinery and equipment? Will you be ready with money in the bank when these 
things are needed? 

You will if you taJ^e the offensive now! Put every extra dollar into U. S 
form of financial reserve ever offered you. Thin^/ You are asked to make 
vestment — not a sacrifice! 



! 

War Bonds t- the best 
a sound and prudent in' 



, When Your Boy Comes Home 

Will your boy come back to a farm or ranch with no financial reserves, 
no future? Or will you greet him at the gate with a bundle of War 
Savings Bonds — for working capital, new machinery, better buildings? 
And if your children are going to college, why not be sure they get 
there by buying today the Bonds that will pay the cost.' | f . 

No need, really, to tell an up-todate farmer or rancher what he needs 
financial reserves for. You know more reasons than anyone else can 
enumerate for setting aside extra dollars to meet the future. Now is 
your chance to do it . . . and help fight the war, too! 

Go on the offensive! Buy all die Bonds you can — today! * 



WE BOUGHT EXTRA VWR BONDS 




You Never Get Less Than You Lendl And you get 

% more than you invest When held 10 years, War Bonds 
yield 2.9% interest compounded semi-annually. You get back 
$4 for every $3. 

Cash When You Need It. If an emergency comes 
along, your War Bonds are like money in the bank. Uncle 
Sam will redeem them in cash — at full purchase price — any 
time after you've held them 60 days. Don't cash them unless 
you have to. And don't hold back a single dollar unneces- 
sarily from the purchase of War Bonds. YOUR HELP IS 

NEEDED. 

- 

Facts About War Bonds (Series E) 

You can buy War Bends from your bank, postmaster, mall 
carrier er Production Credit Association. Don't wait. De 
it by mail if you can't get to town! 



You Lend Uncle Sam 
$18.75' 

37.53 . 

75.00 ] 
375.00 
750.00 

■or America's Future, 



Upon Maturity You Gut Back 
$25.00 

50.00 

100.00 

500.00 

1000.00 



. 



fo r Yea r Future, for Year Children's 
la EXTRA War Savings bends 



■ 






This window sticker identifies yoa es the purchaser of extra War 
Bonds during the Fourth War Lean. It is a badge of honor to be 
displayed with pride. Be the first in your neighborhoed te have 
one. Buy an extra War Bond today! 



This it m official O. S. Treasury advertisememt—prapared under ■ auspices. •] Treasury De per totem t ami War Advertising Cauncil 

&#M BACK THE ATTACK! 

; . j • M • v . ? ; ,' ; . .; 

i* This Advertisement Sponsored by 

Carrollton Tobacco Whse. Co. 



. 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



< 



. 











i : 



CONSTANCE 



• Howard G. Clayton, of Bromley, 
spent Friday night with grand- 
father, Fred Vahlsing. 

Mrs. Lee Cotton and son Billy, of 
Bromley, spent Sunday with Mr. 
"and Mrs. Geo. Loze. 

Sorry to report Mrs. Wm. Ken- 
nedy had the misfortune of injur- 
ing her arm. 

Verne Reeves U. S. N. is home 
from "boot" training, visiting his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Reeves. 

Carl Craven U. S. N. is visiting 
his mother, Mrs. Ray Craven, hav- 
ing completed his "boot" training. 

Pvt. Lloyd F. Hood from Camp 



■' 



Shelby is home visiting his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Luther Hood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer en- 
tertained Saturday with a six 
o'clock dinner in honor of his 
mother's birthday. Those present 
were Mrs. Chas. Hodges, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold Burton and daughter, 
of Latonia, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. 
Kottmyer and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Clayton and daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ollie Kottmyer and the 
host and hostess. 

Sorry . to report Mrs. Geo. Heist 

is seriously ill at her home. 

• Mr. and Mrs. John Helton had 

for their week*end guests, Mrs. 

Brummett and two sons from Cin- 



and 






SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Deliver — Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, .1 KENTUCKY 






.••••> 



■ • • • > 









FLAKE HOMINY ..... 

GRAIN HOMINY 

BISQUICK 

PILLSBURY PANCAKE FLOUR 

MINUTE TAPIOCA 

CLINTON CHOCOLATE PUDDING 
CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE 
APPLES, eating or cooking 

CABBAGE, 

CARROTS ...............•....'.- 

LEAF LETTUCE , . 

HEAD LETTUCE ...... 

KALE ...... 

KRAFT DINNER 1 brown point 

C ALLIES, smofked per lb., 2 brown points... 
BREAKFAST BACON, per lb., 4 brown points 
COUNTRY LARD, per lb., 3 brown points . . 
FRANKS, per lb. 5 brown points ........... 



'• 



, 






.per pound 8c 
.per pound 6c 
small size 20c 

12c 

13c 

package 7c 

per pound 32c 

. .per pound 10c 

per pound 6c 

.per bunch 12c 
per pound 15c 
. .per head 15c 
per pound 12c 

.......10c 

30c 

..35c 

19c 

.......32c 



.... 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiim 

I ANNOUNCEMENT! 1 

= We have opened a new department of Better Grade 
Non-Rationed Shoes for Women and Girls. 



N 



O RATION STAMP NEEDED 

AT ANY TIME 




and Save Here | 

OXFORDS, PUMPS 
STRAPS and WEDGES 

Red, Green, Black 
and Brown 

These shoes are stamp 
and money savers. 



cinnati and Bradley Helton 
family, of Point Pleasant. 

Carl Craven V. 8. N. and. Miss 
Louise Stone were Sunday dinner 
guests of Mr. smd Mrs. C. E. Kott- 
myer and family. 

Mrs. W. E. Zimmer and Mrs. 
Duncan Huey were shopping in 
Cincinnati, Friday. 

Lt. and Mrs. Manlius Goodridge 
spent Sunday with Mrs. Paul Crav- 
en and Irvin Hood. 

Mrs. Bertha Lane is home after 
spending a week with her brother 
in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Depoi, Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Depoi and son, of 
Cincinati called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Ollie Kottmyer, Sunday afternoon. 
At this writing Miss Nell Hemp- 
fling remains ill at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sel Vahlsing, of 
Bromley were Sunday dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs.' Chas. Lewis 
and son. 

Mrs. Chas. Hodges Jr., spent last 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Hodges, Sr., of Hebron. 

Sorry to report' Harry Prabel was 
on the sick list last week. 

Pfc. Jimmy Masters has return- 
ed to Fort Jackson, after spending 
several days with his parents. 

Mr. and Mrs; Wm. "Red" Lane 
spent Sunday with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Lane. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kenyon and 
son motored to Dayton Sunday to 
spend the day with Capt. and Mrs. 
Allen Kenyon. 

Mrs. Esther Easter and daugh- 
ter of Cincinnati, spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. E. Regenbogen. 
Charley Prabel and mother spent 
Sunday with 7 Mr. and Mrs. Stan-' 
ley Maegley, of Crescent Springs.* 
Miss Gertru.de Lane spent Mon- 
day evening in Cincinnati with her 
sister Bertha. 

Sgt. John Brockhoeft returned to 
camp in Tennessee after spending 
a 10-day furlough with Mrs. Min- 
nie Klasserner. Mrs. Brockhoeft 
remained at the home of her moth- 
er. 

Mrs. Emil Regenbogen spent one 
day last week with Mrs. Bertha 
Lane.fi 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burton and 
daughter, of Latonia, spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Kott- 
myer. 



PETERSBURG 



BELLE VIEW 



Priced $3.87 to $4.84 

1 ' 



Pay a little more and get a Whole lot more 

! QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES I 

| 627 MADISON AVE., COVINGTON CO. 1430 f 

5iimimimiiimiiiiiiiiiOPEN Saturday evenings immimmmiiiimmin 

— ■ ■ ■ "— [e *• " * * ' — t ' ~* i 

WINTER FARM NEEDS! 

Anchor White Enameled Cqal Range! $69.00 

Warm Morning Circulating '-Coal Heater... $97.50 
Athe ns 100 lb. size Magazine Heater. $50.00 

ANCHOR BRICK LINED HOT BLAST$^|* 00 
HEATERS in 3 sizes, $31.00, $39.00 and^** 



All sizes Oak Coal Heaters $13.00 up 

All Sizes Wood Drum Heaters $2.75 up 

Perfection Portable Kerosene Heaters $7.95 

Jamesway Electric Chick Hovers $36.00 

200-W. and 800-W ELECTRIC UNITS to Build 
Your Own Chick Brooders $AM and $f* 95 

for ^* W 



1, 3, 5 and 8-Gal. Poultry Fountains 

Poultry Feeders on legs .." $5.50 

10-Gal. Milk Cans 



5-GAL. KEROSENE CAN Full of 
Motor Oil -.... , 



National and Burpee Pressure Cookers 
Cold Pack Canners 



RED JACKET and DAYTON ELECTRIC 
WATER SYSTEMS 






Linoleum Rugs 6x9 to 9x15 

Window Shades 

Electric Wiring Material 

Galvanized Water Pipes and Fittings 

30-Gal. Range Boilers 

Complete Line of Harness 

9 Vi and 10-Ft Bale Ties 

1-4"x2"x12' Steel Sled Soles ( 

Hay Carriers, Track, Pulley and Forks 

Barb Wire and Poultry Netting 

Tobacco Seed and Fertilizer 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Remedies 

Conrad Hardware 



WALTON, 



KENTUCKY 



Cpl. Alpha Lee Rogers, of the 
Army Air Force who has been sta- 
tioned at Yuma, Ariz., is enjoying 
a furlough with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Rogers. 

6unday guests of Rev. and Mrs. 
W. C. Guth and children were Rev. 
and Mrs. Wm.' Smith. 

Mrs. Herman Smith, of Rising 
Sun, Ind., spent Sunday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Ryle. 

Miss Geneva Ashcraft spent the 
week-end with Miss Thelma Rog- 
ers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham and 
son were visiting Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Sherman Burcham and 
daughter Lucinda. 

Mrs. Mary Hankinson is ill this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers and 
daughter Evelyn Anne spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ash- 
craft and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lafe Miller and 
son entertained relatives, Sunday. 

The W. M. S. of the local Bap- 
tist Church held its regular month- 
ly meeting at the home of Mrs. 
Lou Maurer, last Wednesday. 

There will be a "box social" at 
the Belleview school Thursday 
evening, February 10th. Prizes will 
be given for the prettiest home- 
made Valentines. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rogerts left 
Thursday for a visit with Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmo Aylor and daughter 
Joyce Marie, of Chicago, 111. 

There will be a basketball game 
at the New Haven gym Friday 
evening February 11th. The Bur- 
lington team will play New Haven. 

Mrs. Ruth Ashcraft Is at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Louis 
Chilton and is helping to care for 
her little granddaughter, Phyllis 
Ruth, who is seriously ill. 

J. D. McNeely, of Waterloo spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. C* E. 
McNeely. , 



•■ 

Mr. and ftfrs. Perry Mahan spent 
the week-end with her relatives in 
Indiana. 

Mrs. Laura Crisler returned 
home after spending two months 
with her daughter, Mrs. Lloyd Mc- 
Glasson. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Berkshire re- 
turned home Friday after several 
weeks' visit with their son and 
family of Lawrenceburg, Mr. Berk- 
shire is confined to his room on 
account of illness. 

Mrs. Chas. Klopp and her sister 
Mrs. Melvin Pennock, of Lexington 
spent two days last week with their 
aunt, Mrs. Kate O'Brien at Mt. 
Healthy, Ohio. 

Mrs. Kate Cox is 7isiting her 
daughter in Aurora. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson White and 
sons, Mrs. Melvin Pennock and Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. Klopp attended the 
birthday dinner for Mrs. Leonard 
Ruth at Lawrenceburg, last Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Porter Huey spent the week 
end with her husband at Great 
Lakes, Training Station. 

Chas: Shinkle, Jr., has been quite 
ill the past week. <. 

Mrs. "Buster" Snelling spent one 
day last week at her home .here. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ryle* spent 
Friday evening with his sisters in 
Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lampkin and 
daughter visited their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Alloway over the 
week-end. 

The Missionary Society of the 
Christian Church met with Mrs. 
Mrs. John Klopp and ' daughter 
Gladys for an all-day meeting on 
Thursday. 

Mrs. E. P. Berkshire entertained 
with an anagram party on Friday 
afternoon. Guests were Mrs. H. G. 
Mathews, Mrs. Hubert Gaines, Mrs. 
J. M. Thompson, Mrs. B. H. Berk- 
shire, and Miss Elizabeth Walton. 
Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Berkshire 
were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Max Grldley oh Friday evening, the 
occasion being Mrs. Gridley's birtti- 
day. 

Mrs. Nellie Helms is suffering 
with neuritis in her wrist. 

Mrs. Perry Carver spent Friday 
in the City. 

Billy Hitzfield spent the week- 
end with his grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Aibert Hitzfield. 

Mrs. Chas. Klopp received word 
Saturday of the death of her aunt 
Mrs. Kate O'Brien at Mt. Healthy, 
Ohio. • We extend sympathy to. the 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Chambers 
were in Burlington on Wednesday 
afternoon. 



daughter and Mrs, Nan Stephens 
called on Mr. and J Irs. Nat Rogers 
one evening recenf v. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hu h Arnold ipent 
Sunday with Mrs. | jlizabeth Keim, 
of Petersburg. .* 

Alec Griffin spel^t several days 
last week with Mr^and Mrs. Wm. 
McDaniel and famljy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joljn Klopp and 
daughter spent Thursday evening 
with Mrs. Cordie Ojpx and son and 
her house guests thjjjj W. O. Rectors. 

Mrs. Wm. Rogers,sJr., and daugh- 
ter and Mrs. Laura Clore spent 
Thursday afternoojjr with Mrs. Nat 
Rogers. 

Mrs. Ott Rogers s«ent Friday aft- 
ernoon with Mrs. ^L^E. Arnold. 

Mr. and Mrs. .£mn Aylor and 
family spent Sundsfr with Mr. and 
Mrs. Scott Jones, of Covington. 

Mrs. Hugh Arnold spent Satur- 
day afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles White. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Arnold and 
H. E. Arnold were 1 ' shopping in 
Aurora, Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. John Klopp and daughter 
spent Thursday igternoon with 
Mrs. Charles White* 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Slayback were 
shopping in Idlewi^J, Saturday 
— rt . 

HILL r *OP 



FOR SALE— 12 shoats ranging from 
85 to 100 lbs. Amaul Hensley, 
Idlewild, Ky. it-p 



WANTED— Two-pound . fryers or 
broilers. Ful-O-Pep Feed Store, 
512 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 
HEmlock 9168. lt-c 



GUITARS— $9.95 up; Roy Acuff 
and other books. Strings and 
accessories. Hanser Jewelry and 
Music, 5i5y 2 Madison, Coving- 
ton, Ky. it-c. 

INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all legal 
damage claims, plus up to $500.00 
each to you and occupants, of 
your car for injuries and med- 
ical services. Save cash. Phone 
Walter Gaines, BurL 509; Joe 
Dringenbnrg, Flor. 860; Earl 
Aylor, Hebron, Ky.; Ryle Ewbank, 
Warsaw 231$. 32-5t-pd. 



FOR SALE— Eight 60-lb. shoats. 
Mrs. R. J. Akin, Burlington, Ken- 
tucky. 34-2t-pd 



WANTED— Man to work by day or 
month; do general farm work. 
Mrs. Pearl McGlasson & Son, 
Constance, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
388. 32-4t-pd 




little daugh- 
orman Herb- 



LUTHER LEAGUE TO MEET 



The- Luther League will meet 
February;. 16th at 8:00 p. m. at the 
Hebron- Lutheran Church. All 
members- .urged to be present. 



GASBURG 



Paul Nixon spent Sunday after- 
noon with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp. 

Mrs. Howard Huey was shopping 
in Ludlow, Saturday. 

Mrs. Charles White does not im- 
prove as rapidly as her friends 
would like. 

Ralph Montgomery took his 
physical for the army Saturday 
and soon will be inducted. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Snyder were 
business visitors in Idlewild, Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

Mrs. Efnbry Klopp and Mrs. Wil- 
son Leek were shopping in Aurora. 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Leek spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Embry 
Klopp and Mr. and {Mrs. Wilson 
Leek. Afternoon callers^were Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Cook. 

Mrs. Stella Kelly who has been 
the guest of her son Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Kelly, of Aurora, returned to 
the home of her niece, Mrs. Hugh 
Baker last Saturday. 

Mrs. Ralph Montgomery called 
on Mrs. Floyd Snyder, Sunday 
evening. 

B. C. Stephens is the proud own-* 
er of a new tractor. 

Miss Dona Jean Siekman has 
been suffering with the mumps. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son entertained one evening , last 
week in honor of Mr. Klopp's birth- 
day. Among those present were 
Mr. and Mrs. James Jarrell and son 
Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson 
Leek and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Rogers and 
Allen Rogers we're shopping in 
Aurora, Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ott Rogers have as 
their guest, Sol Winkle. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Stephens and 



^_< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 * _ 

I PUBLIC AUCTION I 

1 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12 | 



AT 2:00 P. M. 

LOCATED ON ROUTE 42 NEAR BEACON LIGHT, BEAVER, 

KENTUCKY 3 

On premises of Harold. Bacon known as Doud Farm. All farm- E 
ing tools as I have no use for same and well sell at absolute E 
auction, no strings tied to this sale. E 

Fordson tractor; Oliver tractor plow; disc harrow; drag har- E 
row; gravity mowing machine, 36-inch; 4- tier fatting battery; 

E 5- tier Tuxedo brooder; electric col. brooder; Oil Colony brooder; 

E oil incubator; Rollaway bed. pad; lot drinking fountains; 

E chickens; scythe; gas stove; iron pump (laid in kitchen); coal 
hod; 1 set saines; weed cutter; 1 rug; toilet, flush top; electric = 
plate, 2 burner; sack hog feed. E 

I HAROLD BACON, Owner 1 
I REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 1 

= 623 WASHINGTON STREET COVINGTON = 

HE. 5107 - IND. 5066 

^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii ill 1 1 tt 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 iii 1 1 ii ii 1 1 ii ii ii ti 1 1 ii i in i in it i in i in n iiiiim ■■ittm ■■■mi i iimi miT^ 



Glad to report f^ 
ter of Mr. and Mrs! 
streit much impro 

Mrs. Wm. Bock-hind Mrs. Mary 
Gross were dinnerfjguests of Mrs. 
Minnie Dolehi, last Wednesday. 

Wm. Brockman called on S. J. 
Riggs, Thursday afternoon. 

Sorry to lose Mr. and Mrs. Bob 
Martin from our community. Mr. 
Martin was called into the armed 
service. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Cain, of 
Northport, Mich., called on the 
Carder family, Friday afternoon. 
Mrs. Virginia Regenbogen and son, 
Irvin, of Elizabeth Creek, spent last 
Thursday evening there. 

Mrs. Edna Eggleston* spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Wills, 
of Cincinnati. • 

Mr. and Mrs. Tru .ran Lucas 
were among the guesfcp at a birth- 
day party Saturday evVning at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs£«Albert Avery 
of Erlanger for their"' little daugh- 
ter Barbara Jean's 'th birthday. 

Tuesday afternoon 'Mrs. Barney 
Anderson and Mrs. 7m. Buckler, 
of Hebron, A. D. Kissi *, of Owings- 
ville and Miss Edith >3arder visited 
the airport and called on Mr. and 
Mrs. H. P. Buckler, o&Pt. Pleasant. 

Mr. and Mrs. Refflaen Asbury 
and Carol Ann were£oinner guests 
Sunday evening of : ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Henry Sleet, of Beaver. 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Heist and 
daughter Marie Carol, son Charles 
Justin and Fred Vahlsing, of Con- 
stance were guests of Mrs. Mary C. 
Gross, Sunday evening at dinner. 

Little Carlton Anderson has the 
mumps. 



WANTED— Girl for office work; 
experience not necessary. Call 
Huey Motor Express. Phone Flor. 
1M- . 33-tf 

FOR SALE— White Rock roosters, 
good stock. Price $2.00 each. 
Roscoe Akin, Burlington, Ky. Tel. 
Burl. 170. 33tf 



WANTED— Gasoline washing ma- 
chine. Van Elliott, Erlanger, R. 
4. Tel. Flor. 924. 33-2t-c 



FOR SALE— Fresh milch cows. 
James Allen, 115 Garvey Ave., 
Erlanger, Ky., Tele. Erlanger 
6394-J. 34-3t-pd 



FOR SALE — Two dapple grey mares 
6 years old; 6-year-old Jersey 
cow with calf by side. Jack Fields 
Burlington, Ky. Telephone Burl. 
362. u-pd. 



FOR SALE— 35 head of good native 
stock ewes and one buck, started 
lambing Feb. 1st. Kreylich & 
White, Burlington, Ky. Phone 
175 or 177. it-pd 



FOR RENT— Several acres of land, 
either money rent or half. Apply 
any time after 6 p? m. or Sun- 
days. Mrs. W. E. Hentschel, Bur- 
lington, Ky. 34-2t-p 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS -« ; reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St. V tf 



FOR SAI3£-14 dairy/ cows, 6 with 
calves by side; all -good milkers. 
M. C. Fisher, 1%< miles from 
Florence on U. S. ^2. lt-ch 



jfr- 



PASTURE FOR REJfr— Preferably 
in Kenton Count I for ten to 
fifteen heifers. S J. Vogelsang, 
Covington, Ky. \i 34-3t-c 



FOR SALE— Abou* thirty-five 
Giant White hen«just starting 
to lay. $1.65 eacMflr Meadowview 
Farm, Richardson. Road, Devon, 
Ky. Tel. Indp. 6760. lt-p 



WANTED— Poland China or Hamp- 
shire bred sow, to farrow March 
or April. Hiland 3743. 15 Sun- 
nymede, So. Ft. Mitchell, Ky. lp 



FOR SALE— No. 13 left-hand Vul- 
can breaking plow; 1928 Chevro- 
let motor with battery and 10- 
inch pulley with four speeds. B. 
C. Stephens, Belleview and Pet- 
ersburg Pike, Petersburg, Ken- 
tucky, it-p 



FOR SALE— 4-Room house, water, 
electric, garage, 3 acres; y 2 -acre 
tobacco base. Now vacant. Known 
as Norman Bros. Service Station, 
Route 42, Florence, Ky. H. C. 
Norman, Admr. 34-2t-pd 



FOR SALE— Locust posts; 6 shoats; 
several yearling heifers; one 6- 
year-old grey horse, good work- 

• er. Wilford Dixon, Burlington, 
R. 2. Tel. Burl. 522. It-pd. 



FOR SALE— Abor press, new, 3- 
ton capacity. Wm. Hagedorn, 
856 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, 
Ky. lt-Ch. 

FOR SALE— Five-year-old work 
mare, weigh about 1400 lbs. H. 
Popham, Camp Ernst Road. 34-4p 



WANTED — Man to raise 2 acres to- 
bacco. See Elmer Kirkpatrick, 
Burlington, Ky. 34-2t-p 



BOONE COUNTY. FARMS 

12 ACRES, blacktop road, 18 miles 
from Covington. No buildings. 
Good land, good building site. 
$1000.00. JVill^finance. Five miles 
from Union. \ 

150 ACRES (more or less) 2 miles 
from Union, in corner of two 
blacktop roads; 3.1 acre tobacco 
base; level to rolling; some 
woods. Part of land needs 
cleaning up. Gas station on the 
corner; 2-room cabin; large 
barn. Good neighborhood. In 
one family for many years., Sell- 
ing to settle estate. Electric. $7- 
500.00. Will finance. 

115 ACRES, 4 miles from Union on 
blacktop road; 2.6 acres tobacco 
base. Sold over $1,500.00 worth 
of tobacco this year. Five-room 
cottage; 3-room tenant house, 
needing repair; large barn; meat 
house, poultry house, cellar; 
level to rolling land; some woods. 
$6000.00. Will finance. 

174 ACRES, 20 miles from Coving- 
-ton, 1 mile from blacktop road. 
A hill farm all in* bluegrass and 
clover; 3 acres tobacco base; 
large creek of never failing wat- 
er; old 5-room house in very bad 
repair; crib; no barn; cistern; 
on a creek road, one-fourth mile 
cannot be traveled by automo- 
bile without work being done on 
same. Will furnish 4-room 
house near farm rent free for 12 
months. $4500.00. $2000.00 cash, 
balance $250.00 per year, 5 per- 
cent interest. Come prepared to 
walk one-fourth mile. Mile from 
electric. Very cheap if you can 
use one like this. 

A." B. RENAKER 

34-tf Burlington, Ky. Tel. 12 or 55 



INCOME TAX— Save money by 
having your tax return properly 
filed. My system, no long wait- 
ing. Same guide that Internal 
Revenue men use. Evenings and 
week-ends. Rates reasonable. R. 
V. Lents, Constance, Ky. 32-4t-p 



FOR SALE — Coleman gasoline 
table top range, like new. Hi. 
6524. Mrs. Frank Wilson. Crest- 
wood Ave., Cold Springs, Ken- 
tucky. 33-3t-c 



FOR SALE— Seven 50-lb. shoats. 
F. G. Louden, Burlington, Ky., 
R. 2. 33-2t-p 



WANTED — Lawn mower, new or 
used. Phone Heb. 364-X. 33-2c 



FOR SALE— 245-acre farm; 9-room 
house and one 3-room house; 2 
barns, electric; school bus by 
door. J. E. Snyder, ?S/ Z miles N. 
of BuUittsvUle;. Tel. Hebron 
264- 33-2-pd. 



WANTED— Farm hand to work by 
month; married; reference re- 
quired. . Must be able to drive 
truck. J. E. Snyder, 2y 2 N. of 
BuUittsvUle. Tel. Heb. 264. 33-2p 



FOR SALE— New table model 
cream separator, used one month 
$15.00; 1 all-steel turning plow, 
price $10.00. W. E. Snyder, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 889. 33-2p 



FOR SALE — Fresh cow with sec- 
ond calf ;also coming 1 -year-old 
pony colt, saddle bred. Frank 
Kelly, Burlington, Ky. Tel. Burl. 
461. lt-c 



FAR 



WITH POSSESSION 1 IARCH 1 1944 

BOONE CO T *TY 

125 ACRES, 5-rooii 'house, barn, 
electric, dairy barttf good road;' 
3-4. tobacco land; 'foacre tobacco 
base. This is a real^farm; a nice 
location. $6800. If^ you want a 
farm don't be late./ 

KENTON COUNTY— 125 acres; 
house, barn, electric; lots of good 
new land; lot of timber $5500. 

BOONE COUNTY--#l acres, good 
road; electric- in all bldgs; 4-rm. 
cottage, newly painted; large 
barn; tenant house; iy 2 -acre to- 
bacco base. $5500. 

KENTON COUNTY— Near Devon, 
59 acres, elec. in all bldgs > on a 
good road; 6- room house; large 
barn; double corn crib; "sanitary 
milk house; new brick chicken 
house; hen house; brooder house 
9 acres alfalfa; 2 acres tobacco 
base; posession now; team tools 
extra). Price $5900. 

BOONE COUNTY'S richest section 
— 71 actes, nice 7-room modern 
house; large new barn; fenced 
and crossfenced; jhew woven 
wire; 3 A. tobacco bvse. This is 
a real farm. Price 510,500. 

NEAR BURLINGTOI r-54 acres, 
level, some woods ;< /State road; 
new 5-room shinglii bungalow, 
(English type) nothiig like it to- 
day. $8000. A 

REL C. WAYMAN 

Office: 623 Washington St. 

Covington. Phone HE. 5107 

Ind. 5064 






WANTED — Capable companion 
housekeeper for an alone aged, 
refined woman.. For further in- 
formation call Dixie 7408-W or 
personal interview at 35 Erlang- 
er Road, Erlanger, Ky. 34-2-c 



FOR SALE— Six-year-old grey 
horse; perfectly sound and a 
good worker. B. C. Griffith, Bur- 
lington-Belleview Road. lt-p 



WILL SELL OR TRADE for like 
property in Florence or Erlang- 
er my 7-room house at Front & 
Broadway, Petersburg, Ky. Ask 
Mrs. Ruth, next door. M. K. 
Blackburn, 940 Dixie Highway, 
Erlanger, Ky. 34-4t-p 



FOR SALE — Or trade, coal heating 
stove, wood or coal range with 
hot water tank; pole for two- 
horse spring wagon. John Han- 
auer, Box 187, Route 4, Erlanger, 
Ky. It-pd. 

WISCONSIN DAIRY COWS— Just 
received 50 head of heavy-pro- 
ducing Guernsey dairy cows. 
These are all record cows with 
plenty of quality; all T. B. and 
Bang's tested. Also 40 head of 
horses. All stock must be as 
represented or money refunded. 
Week's trial given. Easy pay- 
ments can be arranged. GENER- 
AL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 East 
Second St., Covington, Ky., Open 
Sunday. - : lt-c 



FOR SALE — Maytag gasoline en- 
gine. Wm. Hagedorn, 856 Dixie 
Highway, Erlanger. lt-c 

FOR SALE — White enamel range in 
good condition, with reservoir, 
double oven, clock and oven 
thermometer. Thad Ryle, Union, 



Ky., R. 1.1 



34-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Approximately . 100 
bushels of yellow soybeans. Must 
bring own sacks. Thad Ryle, 
Union, Ky., R. 1. 34-2p 



TOBACCO SEED— Warner's Gold- 
en Burley improved white bur- 
ley. Agents: L. A. Conner, Bur- 
lington; B. F. Elliott, Walton; 
Walter Renaker, Verona; or by 
mail. $1.50 oz., 75c Vz oz. Clay 
Bedford, Cynthiana, Ky. 31-6t-c 



FOR SALE— Upright piano, Fisher 
make; ebony case; good condi- 
tion. Price, cheap. Call Mrs. 
Grace Castleman, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. 39. 31-tf. 



FOR SALE— DeLavai magnetic 
electric milker; practically new. 
W. O. Rector, Petersburg, Ky., R. 
D. Tel. Burl. 372. 31-tf 



GET YOUR TOBACCO SEED AT 
CONNER'S LUNCH ROOM— I 
have Ky. 41A. This seed is the 
latest developed by the Experi- 
ment Station, highly resistant to 
root rot, quick grower, high yield- 
ing. Alsd No. 16 Root Rot Resist- 
ant. Both of these seeds are 
certified by the State. The old 
standby Warner's Golden Burley. 
Come in, get the seed to produce 
the kind of tobacco yoUr ground 
requires. L. A. Conner, Burling- 
ton, Ky. 30-tf 



LET HELM help increase your 
poultry profits; America's heavi- 
est laying strains; officially pull- 
orum tested; 20 years contest 
winners; official world's records; 
government approved; hatching 
year around. HELM'S HATCH- 
ERY, Paducah, Ky. oJuly31 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf. 



BE SAFE— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 
BEDROOM SUITES $49.00 op 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike St. Cov. Go. 175* 



/ 



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tsenvcAND 

County Recorder ^^ 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



■ 



VOLUME 68 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February 17, 1944 









M3 ot 



*>HT& 



* 






NUMBER 35 



RED CROSS GOAL 
SET AT $8,700.00 



IN BOONE COUNTY, ACCORDING 
TO IRVTN ROUSE, CHAIRMAN 
—QUOTA LAST YEAR WAS 

$4,300.00. 






Or 



Jn March 1 the largest Red 
Cross drive in history will be start- 
ed in this country, with a goal of 
two hundred million dollars. Boone 
County's quota has been set at $8,- 
700.00, and plans are now being 
made by the County Chairman, 
Irvin Rouse, to meet it. 

When it is considered that Boone 
County has about 950 boys in the 
Services, and that if ten dollars 
were collected for each boy, the 
quota would be more than obtain- 
ed, it seems it should be done. 
Surely Boone County would not 
want any one of its boys to feel 
there was not fen dollars worth of 
interest in him at home? 
" Last year Boone County's quota 
■was $4,300.00, but because of un- 
precedented responsibilities, due to 
the war, our quota is more than 
doubled. This means each indiv- 
idual subscription must be, doubled 
too. Start now to prepare to meet 
this obligation. 

' Among other services, ymt Red 
Cross helps service men with per- 
sonal problems, sends food parcels 
to war prisoners, aids service fam- 
ilies and disabled veterans, oper- 
ates service clubs overseas, fecruits 
Army and Navy nurses, handles 
emergency messages for service- 
men and families, collects life sav- 
ing blood, provides comforts, cheer 
and recreation in hospitals, makes 
surgical dressings, and helps when 
disaster strikes at home. 



Junior Class To Give 



Play At Burlington 



The Junior class of Burlington 
High School will' present Walter 
Blake's lates and most hilarious 
farce entitled, "The Nutt Family," 
on February 25th at the school 
auditorium. By special arrangement 
with Samuel French, international 
play publishers, permission has 
been secured to produce this fun- 
niest of plays. The cast has been 
picked and rehearsals are under 
way. 

Mr. Blake is noted for his 
pungent dialogue, and he has 
written the best play of his career 
in "The Nutt Family." with situ- 
ation that would make a graven 
imag? come to life and laugh, and 
the fun is all of the clean and 
wholesome type that sends audi- 
ences home laughing and longing 
for more of the same kind. 

The Junior class is to be com- 
mended for selecting this play, 
since the parts will give every 
member o f the large cast a chance 
to show his talent. 

Mr. and.Mrs. A. G. McMullen en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Reuben 
Kirtley and daughter Phyllis and 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie McMullen, last 
Thursday night, February 10th in 
honor of Cpl. Leslie McMullen, Jr. 



Leon (Shake) Ryle, of Florence 
was a pleasant caller at this office 
Tuesday afternoon. He is employ- 
ed by the Dixie Traction Co., of 
Erlanger. 



Rural Recreation, 
* Meeting Expected Te 

Attract Older Youth 



The rural recreation meeting to 
be held at Burlington school this 
evening (Thursday), February 17, 
at 7:45 p. m. is expected to at- 
tract substantial numbers of older 
youth from all sections of ' the 
county, according to H. R. Fork- 
ner, County Agent. Carl W. Jones, 
older youth specialist, is an expert 
in leading older youth games. 

M, he Utopia Club sponsoring the 
ev ait invited all older youth and 
yo ith leaders in the county to at- 
tend and to take part in the pro- 
gram. The purpose of the meeting 
will be to demonstrate methods 
and attempt to find better ways of 
community-sponsored older youth 
recreation on an organized basis. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 
Sunday, Feb. 20, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Wm. Meier, Supt. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
"World Day of Prayer" service will 
be conducted by the Missionary 
Society and the Brotherhood. All 
members and friends of the con- 
gregation are cordially invited to 
attend. 



FIRE MEETING 
SET TONIGHT 



FOR ALL PERSONS DESIRING TO 
WORK ON FIRE EQUIPMENT- 
WARNING SntEN TO BE IN- 
STALLED THIS WEEK. 



A work meeting has been called 
for Thursday night of this week at 
the firehouse in Burlington at 6:30 
p. m. for the purpose of complet- 
ing the fire truck and getting 
ready for the first test of the 
truck and fittings which must be 
done before the paint Job can be 
completed. 

*^ie outside warning siren is to 
be installed this week and will 
havfe to be tested thoroughly be- 
for' put into operation. Everyone 
is \ rged not to become alarmed 
when the siren is sounded as it will 
be only for testing purposes until 
everyone is notified otherwise. It 
will also be sounded to. notify 
everyone 'of a fire meeting at the 
firehouse. 

Much practice will be required 
for our men who are to handle trie 
fire equipment and everyone is 
urged to cooperate and not become 
alarmed until you are notified that 
the department is really in oper- 
atiojn. 

A fire department is no better 
than the organization behind it, 
and therefore it will take a lot of 
hafid^ training on the part of the 
fin men in order to have a good 
V|. inteer Fire Department. Please 
ren ember these men are giving of 
thej* time and money in order to 
train themselves' to protect our 
property from fire. With the co- 
operation of everyone we can have 
a good rural fire department. 



BURLEY GROWERS 
WILL HEAR HUNT 



SPECIALIST WDjL DISCUSS 
IMPROVED METHODS OF WEED 
. PRODUCTION FOR HIGHER 
QUALITY AND YIELD. 

M — • 

Boone County's 1943 million 
dollar tobacco crop will be discuss- 
ed in a meeting at Burlington Fri- 
day evening, February 25, at 7:45 
p. m., according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. Russell Hunt, to- 
bacco special from the College, Will 
advise with farmers attending the 
meeting, on ways and means of 
securing higher yields and higher 
quality leaf from the 1944 crop. 

The county, the past year, pro- 
duced more than two million 
pounds of. leaf from approximately 
2,350 acres. Growers following some 
of the new fertilizer and produc- 
tion recommendations the past 
year produced in excess of a ton 
of high quality leaf per acre. This 
is a goal planned by leading farm- 
ers cooperating in a number of 
production -demonstrations plan- 
ned for this year. 

The meeting on February 25th 
will be one of planning for im- 
proved practices. All tobacco 
growers are invited to attend. 



St. Henry Defeats L 
Local Team In 
Close Game Friday 

St. Henry's Crusaders traveled to 
Walton Friday night to hand the 
home team a 37-3$ defeat in a 
thriller. 

Walton held a 12-11 lead at the 
end of the first period. 9t. Henry 
took the lead in the second quarter 
22-17, and the third period was a 
nip-and-tuck affair with Walton 
rallying to lead 29-27. Ralph and 
Rich Flesch tdssed in goals in the 
final period to put St. Henry • in 
the lead 37-32. Wynn nearly pull- 
ed the game out of the fire for 
Walton with a pair of field goals. 

Fussinger led the winners scor- 
ing with 12 points, while Wynn top- 
ped the losers with 10. 

In a preliminary game, St. Henry 
downed the Waltons. second string 
men by a score of 21-20. 

New Haven downed the Burling- 
ton basketball team Tuesday night 
by a score of 32-21 on the New 
Haven floor. New Haven took an 
early lead and maintained a safe 
margin throughout the game. 

Presser led the attack of the Bur- 
lington boys with 12. points, while 
Wharton collected 14 for the win- 
ners. 

In a preliminary game, New 
Haven's reserve emerged on the 
long end of 23-13 count over Bur- 
lington reserves. 

_, ; 1 — L k- 

Herman Wingate, of Erlanger 
spent Tuesday afternoon in Bur- 
lington, greeting his many friends 
While in town he called at The 
Recorder office, having his sub- 
scription date moved up. 



PROMINENT MAN 
ANSWERS CALL 



WATERLOO FARMER DIES AT 
AGE OF 70— FUNERAL SER- 
VICES HELD SATURDAY AT 
BELLEVIEW. 

'_ 

William Gideon Kite, age 70 
years passed away at his home 
at Waterloo, late Wednesday of 
a heart attack. 

Mr. Kite had been a resident of 
Boone County his entire life: He 
was a director, of the American 
Jersey Cattle [Association, a di- 
rector of the Citizens Deposit Bank 
of Grant, and operated a jersey 
dairy farm with his son-ih-law, 
O. W. Purdy. 

Mr. Kite was well known thru- 
out the county and was active in 
civic and church affairs. He was 
an elder of the Belleview Christian 
Church. At one time he operated 
a general store in Waterloo. 

He is survived by a daughter, 
Jeanetta Lea Kite Purdy and four 
grandchildren, Jean Keyes, Nellie 
Joanna, Lesta Elizabeth and Byron 
David Purdy. 

Funeral services were held Sat- 
urday morning at 11:00 at the 
Belleview Christian Church with 
Sam Hamilton, pastor, officiating. 
Burial was in the family lot, Bur- 
lington Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs Walton 
funeral directors were in charge 
of arrangements. 



Mrs. Fannie Laird 



Funeral services were held at 
the Methodist Church, Camden, 
Ohio for Mrs. Fannie Laird, 77, 
who died Friday at the home of 
her daughter, Mrs. Carver A. Kuck, 
125 Commonwealth Ave., Erlanger. 
Burial was at Camden. 

Mrs. Laird, widow of the late 
Rev. John F. Laird, Methodist min- 
ister at Oxford, O., leaves besides 
the daughter, with whom, she was 
living, another daughter, Mrs. El- 
bert Snyder, Springdale, O.; three 
sons, Earl, San Francisco, Calif; 
Ralph, Kansas City, Mo., and Glov- 
er Laird, Covington; two sisters 
and 13 grandchildren. 

Philip Taliaferro, Erlanger fu- 
neral director was in charge of 
arrangements. 



FOUR-H PROJECTS 
ARE ORGANIZED 



CLOTHING CLASSES HAVE BEEN 
STARTED IN FOUR PRECINCTS 
ACCORDING TO MARY HOOD 
GILLASPIE. 



Organization of 4-H Home Econ- 
omics projects for 1944 is almost 
completed, according - to Mary 
Hood Gillaspie, Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent. Eleven 4-H clubs have 
groups of girls taking clothing, 
foods, canning and labor service 
projects. Girls in four clubs plan 
to take room improvement. 

Clothing classes have been start- 
ed in Grant, Verona, Hamilton and 
Petersburg. Adult leaders selected 
by the local club will meet weekly 
with project groups until the 
close of school. 

Any girl between the ages of 9 
and 21 may take one or more 4-H 
projects. The only requirements 
of membership are that members 
complete their project and turn in 
some type of simple written report 
at the end of the 4-H year. 

Following are clubs and leaders 
who have completed their organi- 
zation: Grant, True Blues, Mrs. 
Lillian Scott, Mrs. Hugh McArthur, 
Mrs. Martha Wolfe, Mrs. Laura 
Frances Rogers, Mrs. Edward Rog- 
ers and Mrs. Allen Rogers; Hamil- 
ton, Mrs. J. C. Acree; Petersburg, 
Mrs. Georgia Jarboe and Mrs. 
Hazel White; Verona, Mrs. Walter 
King, Mrs. Leila Wasson and Mrs. 
Elena Hamilton; Constance, Mrs. 
Thomas Kenyon. 



WELL KNOWN CITIZEN DIES 




William Hill Sells 
4544 Pounds Of torley 
For Average U $56.59 



William Gideon Kite 



BROTHERHOOD WILL 

SPONSOR SUPPER FEB. 23 

The Bullittsvill* Christian Church 
Brotherhood will sponsor a supper 
at the church Wednesday evening, 
February 23, beginning at 7 p. m. 
Bring your lunch and enjoy the 
evening. 



FEED SHORTAGE 
IS PREDICTED 









BY L. A. VENNES, UNLESS GOOD 
CROPS ARE PRODUCED THIS 
YEAR IN TALK TO BOONE CO. 
FARMERS WEDNESDAY. 





• 

L. A. Vennes, market specialist 
from the College of Agriculture, 
advised livestock producers in a 
meeting in Burlington Wednesday, 
February 9, to expect less feed per 
head of livestock in 1944 and 1945 
unless good crops are produced 
this year. Livestock numbers are 
at record highs and the surplus 
feed supplies of former years are 
practically exhausted. 

Boone County farmers normally 
import feed and should make 
every effort this year to produce 
the maximum amount of. feed 
needed for their livestock. This 
may mean considerable adjustment 
in livestock numbers on some 
farms. 

Danny Welch, sheep salesman 
and Mr. Whistler of the Producers 
Cpoperative Livestock Association 
outlined livestock marketing prob* 
lems of the Cincinnati -.LivestocK 
Market in recent months. A special 
livestock committee was appointed 
to represent the county at the Co- 
operative Livestock Marketing 
meeting in Cincinnati on February 
17th. 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 
• Rev. H. M. Hauter, Pastor 



Sunday, Feb. 20, Bible School at 
10:00 a. m. Mr. Woodford Crigler, 
Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

The Women's Missionary Socle 
ty will hold their monthly devo- 
tional and business meeting at the 
church Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 2:00 
p. m. Mrs. L. H. Rouse will lead 
the devotions. 

The Helpers' Circle will meet at 
the church for their monthly de- 
votional and business meeting, 
Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 8:00 p. m. 
Mrs. John W. Dolwick, Jr., will lead 
the devotions. 

- 

LIGHT TOBACCO 
SALES REPORTED 



TOTAL OF 6,855,332 POUNDS 
SELLS FOR AVERAGE OF $43.77 
—COVINGTON, CARROLLTON 
HAVE GOOD AVERAGE. * 



Banks Will Observe 
Washington's Birthday 
Tuesday, Feb. 22nd 



All ' banks throughout Boone 
County will be closed on Tuesday, 
February 22nd in observance of 
Washington's birthday. 

All county offices will be closed 
on this holiday it was announced 
this week by Judge C. L. Cropper. 
Persons are urged* to take notice 
of the above announcement and 
make arrangements accordingly. 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Williamson 
and children soent Saturday night 
with Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Craig. 



Sales of burley tobacco were light 
in Kentucky during the past week, 
the total reported by the Kentucky 
State Department of Agriculture 
being 6,855,332 pounds. 

The week's average of $43.77 a 
hundredweight was only 4 cents 
below that of the previous week. 
Last week's total amount paid was 
$3,013,854.97. 

With warehouses and growers 
reporting that there remains much 
tobacco in the barns awaiting a 
season to get the tobacco down, the 
closing date for the market remains 
indefinite with the probable date 
now February 25. 

During the past week Carrollton 
sold 596,118 pounds of burley for 
an average of $45.02 a hundred- 
weight. 

The Covington market showed a 
good average by selling 182,326 
pounds for an average of $47.36 a 
hundredweight. 



William Hill sold 454^ ^pounds of 
tobacco last week for an average 
of $56.59 per hundredweight. The 
three high baskets brought $60 
each, ' 

Eugene Doolin, a member of New 
Haven 4-H club, sold 1264 pounds 
of, burley for an average t>f $53 per 
hundred pounds. George Bullock 
of the Hebron 4-H Clvi sold 160 
pounds of burley for k a average 
of $50 per hundred. 

These tobacco profc cts were 
carried in addition to cither farm.1 
work and projects earned by the 
bbys. • tf 



Reimer-Melvin 



Lt. Lorraine Reimer, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reimer of 
Hebron became the bride of Cpl. 
Walter Melvin, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Melvin of Boston, 
Mass., in a ceremony solemnized 
at the home of the bride February 
8th at 7:30 p. m. with Rev. Noble 
Lucas officiating. • 

The bride wore dark navy blue 
uniform with corsage of American 
red roses and carried white iBible. 
Tie matron of hon >r, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Graves, sister « ' the bride 
wore soldier blue si 
roses. 

Cpl. Melvin's best 
liam Graves, husban 
ron of honor. 

Russell Hodge a 
Miss Mabel Ritter sang, "Ah, Sweet 
Mystery of Life," and "Because." 
During the Wedding March the 
bride walked alone to an altar dec- 
orated with gjadiolus, clusters of 
wedding bells and candles. As the 
couples reached the altar, Miss 
Gladys Reimer sang "I. Love You. 
Truly." 

Following the ceremony refresh- 
ments were served to the as- 
sembled guests. 

Lt. Reimer is now stationed with 
the Army Nursing Corps at Camp 
Lee, Virginia. Cpl. Melvin is with 
the medical corps at Camp 
Dorn, Miss. 



with white 

Ian was Wil- 
• of the mat- 

impanied by 



Van 



SOLDIERS WILL 
RECE'VE PAY 



WHEN DISCHARGE FROM U. S. 
ARMY— SUMS tiFV$100 TO $300 
WILL BE GIVE N SJfrL DnSRS DE- 
PENDING ON SE^CE. 

# 

Boone Post No. 4 of the Ameri- 
can Legion of Kentucky has re- 
ceived a sur)ply of forms to be 
used by World War II veterans in 
making application for their must- 
er-out pay, it has been announced 
by C. G. Kelly, post adjutant. 

Honorably discharged World War 
n veterans desiring to make appli 
cation for muster-out pay may 
procure a copy of the form, togeth 
er with information as to where it 
is to be mailed, by calling upon 
Adjutant C. G. Kelly at Burling- 
ton, Ky. • 

All service men and women 
under the rank of captain are 
eligible to receive muster-out pay 
except those over 38 years who 
asked to be discharged to take a 
civilian *job; those dishonorably 
discharged and students in the 
Army's education training pro 
gram. 

The muster-out pay bill as en 
(acted by the Congress provides 
$100 to veterans with less than 60 
days of domestic service; $200 to 
veterans with more than 60 days 
of domestic service, and $300 for 
those with service overseas or in 
Alaska. 

Procurement and distribution of 
these forms by the local Legion 
Post, according to Adjutant Kelly, 
is just another example of the or- 
ganization's willingness and de- 
sire to be of service to the men and. 
women honorably discharged from 
World War H. i 



Mrs. Florence E. Riggs 

Funeral services* for Florence E. 
Riggs, 22 Locust Street, Erlanger, 
were held at the Taliaferro funer- 
al home, Saturday afternoon at 
two o'clock. Burial was in the 
Florence Cemetery. 

Mrs. Riggs had be i a resident 
of Erlanger for . mo ; than 53 
years. She was thehwidow of E. 
H. Riggs. . :S 

She is survived by«three daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Findlay $ishback and 
Mrs. John J. McCoUum, both of 
Erlanger, and Mrs. E. E. Parsley, 
Stanford, Ky.; a son, Harry L. 
Riggs; a brother, M. J. Mitchell 
and three grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were in 
charge of Philip Ts'iaferro, Er- 
langer funeral direc >r. 



Bond Quota Exceeded 
By $100,000 ,ls Report 



Two More Boone 

County Farms 

Reported Sold 



Mr: and Mrs. Virgil O. Vater, 
of Newport purchased 115 acres, 
known as the Lon Utz farm, in the 
Big Bone Baptist Church neighbor- 
hood, from the Garrison heirs. The 
purchasers expect to move to this 
farm March 1st. 

Roy C. Lutes, rural mail carrier, 
of Florence, purchased 150 acres 
two miles west of Union, at Huey's 
corner, from the Garrison heirs, on 
which tract of land the filling sta- 
tion is located. Possession will be 
given March 1st. 

Both of these sales were made 
the past week through A. B. Ren- 
aker. These farms have been in 
the Garrison families for almost a 
century and were sold to settle the 
Garrison estate. 



COVINGTON FIRMS ALLOCATED 
OVER $50,000.00 TO BOONE 
COUNTY — MANY PRECINCTS 
OVERSUBSCRIBED. 



VALUE STRESSED 
OF YOUTH RALLY 



SCHEDULED AT FLORENCE 
SCHOOL MARCH 25— CONTENT-J 
ED RURAL LIFE FOR YOUTH IS 
AIM. 

This is the second of a series of 
articles leading up to the Rural 
Youth Conference which is to be 
held at the Florence school March 
25th. 

The greatest value that we re- 
ceive from getting together is the 
inspiration that comes to us when 
we meet and mingle with each 
other. There are no "self-made 
men." While many have had to 
strive to overcome difficulties in 
order to attain a certain goal, 
someone, sometime in that person's 
life gave him the inspiration to 
fight for that goal. 

"There is a time we know not 
when, 

A place- we know not where 

That marks the destiny of man, 

To glory, or despair." 

As a group of young people are 
brought together, one life may 
touch another in such a way that 
the ultimate destiny of one is' 
changed. 

If we are to be a happy and 
wholesome individual there are 
numerous phases of our nature 
that must be developed. We recog 
nize as the most important of the 
following: The physical, mental, 
social and the mcral or spiritual 
Each of these ma3 .be divided into 
other characte ist fs that should 
be developed. Wv cannot be the 
person we shouldjjfbe and neglect 
any of the above &arts of human 
nature. A persorf may be- a 
physical giant, but if he is not de- 
veloped mentally he is an undesir 
able. He may be strong mentally 
and not developed socially or spir 
itually and therefore be an unde 
sirable. 

The Youth Rally takes into con 
sideration the complete individual 
and will strive to weave all of this 
into one central idea— a ' happy 
contended rural life. 



Paulson-Deck 






Miss Arvilda I Paulson, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Bernice Paulson, of 
Black River Falls, and Pfc. Harold 
D. Deck, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
C. Deck, of Petersburg, -were united 
in marraige Saturday, January 8, 
1944. Rev. Harry 4 M. Perry per- 
formed the ceremony. 

The bride wore a sky blue two- 
piece dress with a corsage of roses. 

The attendants were Robert 
Grabe, friend of the bridegroom 
and Miss Kathryn Paulson, sister 
of the bride. She too, wore a sky 
blue two-piece suit. 

A wedding supper was served at 
the home of Mrs. Bernice Paulson, 
mother of the bride. Mrs. Harold 
Deck will join her husband in 
Tomah. He is serving at the Tom- 
an Radio School. 

The many friends of the groom 
join in extending good wishes for 
happiness to Mr. and Mrs. Deck. 



FLORENCE HOMEMAKERS 

The February meeting of the 
Florence Homemakers will be held 
at the Town Hall Friday, February 
18, 10:30 a. m. "The Eradication 
of Household Pests" is the subject 
of the lesson. 

Mabel' G. Sayre, Reporter. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Craig and 
Mrs. Bessie Clore attended the sale 
of Mrs. Sadie Tanner, Saturday. 



I 

§ 



At the close of business last Fri- 
day/light, Saturday being a bank 
holiday,, total subscriptions to the 
Fourth War Loan Drive amounted 
to $364,06655 which was approx- 
imately $136,000.00 short of Boone 
County's quota of $500,000.00, with 
Beaver, Belleview, Burlington, Pet- 
ersburg and Hebron-Bullittsville 
announcing "over the top." * 

All day long Monday and Tues- 
day of this week the telephone 
wires were kept busy urging the 

precinct chairmen and their work- 
kers to make extra effort to raise 
this shortage. Walton, Florence 
and Constance announced Tuesday 
that their quotas had been raised, 
and with some oversubscriptions in 
many precincts it can be stated 
that all precincts are '"over the 
top" and Boone County has again 
met the call of our country. 

When the news went out Monday 
morning that Boone County was 
short $136,000:00 on its quota, sev- 
eral business firms of Covington 
who are interested in Boone Coun- 
ty and who receive business from 
this section, allocated over $50,- 
000.00 of their subscriptions to this 
county, just in case we needed it. 
The county chairman also received 
a wire from Louisville stating that 
they h^d allocated $15,000.00 to us 
and were prepared to give us more 
if we needed it in raising our 
quota. 

While it developed that we would 
not have needed this help, but it 
was a magnanimous jesture On the 
part of these men who feel an in- 
terest in Boone County and its 
people, and by these outside allo- 
cations it is now predicted that our 
county quota will be exceeded by 
close to $100,000.00. A more de- 
tailed report will appear in this 
paper next week. i { 

Wm. Theodore Webster 

■ 

Funeral services for William 
Theodore Webster were conducted 
from the Chambers & Grubbs fu- 
neral home Sunday at 2 p. m:, with 
burial in Walton Cemetery. 

Mr. Webster died at the home of 
his sister, Mrs. Claudia Schould- 
ers, Walton, early Friday morn- 
ing. . 

He is survived by his mother, 
Mrs. Fannie Webster, Independ- 
ence; 4 sisters, Mrs. Martha Read- 
nour, Mrs. Lula Sturgeon, both of 
Covington; Mrs, May Hogan, of 
Hartford, Conn.; and Mrs. Claudia 
Schoulders, Walton; three brothers, 
Harvey Webster, Crittenden, Ky.; 
Foster Webster, Independence, and 
Arney Webster, 'Suman, Ind. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of arrangements. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ellison Rector re- 
ceived a letter from their son Jack 
stating that he has left North 
Africa and is now located some- 
where in England. His address is 
Pvt. Jack D. Rector 35680707, Co. B 
237 Eng. (C) Bn., APO 230, care 
Postmaster, New York, N. Y. ; \ 



PROTEIN FEED 



DUE TOJIRRIVE 



THIS WEEK, ACCORDING TO 
H. R. FORKNER— CAR WILL 
CONTAIN APPROXIMATELY 3* 
TONS OF COTTONSEED MEALj 



Boone County farmers are sche- 
duled to receive their first cooper- 
atively ordered, carload of cotton- 
seed meal this week, according to 
H, R. Forkner, County Agent. The 
carload of approximately thirty 
tons of cottonseed has been order- 
ed by. forty farmers, and marks Jthe 
first carload of protein feeds avail- 
able to local farmers since the 
start of the winter feeding period. 
A part of a carload was received 
about two months ago. 

Protein feeds in the form of 
soybean . meal, cottonseed meal and 
tankage have not been available 
oh local markets for many months. 
The present delivery was ordered 
thru the County AAA Committee 
from allotments made by the War 
Food Administration. Farmers who 
may need additional protein con- 
centrates should file their orders 
with the county AAA Committee. 



^««*1 



:■ 



( 



- 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



; ' 




. 














J 











anflHE COUNTY RECORDER 



A. E. STEPHENS, Editor and Owner 
RAYMOND COMBS, Asso. Editor 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mail Matter 

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KENTUCKY PRESJ 
'ASSOCIATION, 

ilCAlUtb )AKUAkt.U»t 



GASBURG 



Messrs John Klopp, Lloyd Siek- 
man, Charlie White and H. W. 
Baker were business visitors in 
Burlington Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Montgomery 
and family have as their guests, 
Mr. Montgomery's mother r> and 
sister from Illinois. 

This community was saddened 
twice last week when news reached 
here Monday of the death of J. B. 
Berkshire of Petersburg and later 
when news reached here of 
the sudden death of G. W. Kite, of 
Waterloo. Both of these gentle- 
man will be misse"d in their respec- 
tive communities. Deepest sym- 
pathy is extended to their families. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Arnold were 
business visitors in Burlington one 
day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
family spent Monday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilson Leek and their 
families. 

Robert White and sisters, Misses 
Jean and Irene attended the party 
at John Edwin Carvers, Saturday 
night. 

Misses Norma and Betty Jarboe 
spent Wednesday night with Miss 
Mary Bess and Miss Shirley Burns. 

Sherman Burcham, of Belleview, 
spent Thursday afternoon with 



Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham. 
Master Ronnie accompanied him 
home to spend the night. 

Mrs. H. E. Arnold called on Mrs. 
Ott Rogers, Monday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Pope and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. W. O. 
Rector and daughter called on the 
Klopp-Leek families, Tuesday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham at- 
tended the box supper at Belleview, 
Thursday night. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Aylor had 
as their guest Saturday night, 
Miss Nancy Huey, of Dayton, O. 

Miss Jane Aylor and Mrs. Ann 
Townsend spent the week-end with 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Aylor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Montgomery 
and family and their house guests, 
Mr. Montgomery's mother and sis- 
ter of Illinois were entertained at 
dinner Thursday evening at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Grant, 
of near Idlewild. 

Mrs. Allen Burcham called on 
Mrs. Wm. Burns one afternoon last 
week. 

Howard Huey called on H. W. 
Baker, -Thursday evening. 

Mrs. and Mrs. John Klopp, E. E. 
Klopp and W lson Leek spent last 
Thursday wit! the Courtney Popes 
and shreddec" fodder. 

Miss Nancy^Huey of Dayton, O., 
spent from Saturday until -Tues- 
day with relatives here. 

Mrs. John Aylor* spent Thurs- 
day with Mrs.-Howard Huey. 

Mr. and M«s. Nat Rogers were 
business visitors in Cincinnati one 
day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. ; Klopp and son 
attended thef Tanner sale, Satur- 
day. t» 

George Abdon is on the sick list 

Mr. Koolman, of Latonia called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Siekman, 
Sunday. 

W. O. Rectc , of Petersburg call- 
ed on the Kl< ,p-Leek families and 
the A. H. Co^ks, Sunday after- 



noon. % 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son called on Mr. and Mrs. John 
Klopp, Sunday evening. 

Allen Burcham was a business 
visitor in Aurora, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers and 
daughter and Mrs. John Rogers 
attended the funeral of W. G. Kite, 
Saturday. 

Miss Cleta May Neace spent Fri- 
day night with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
McDaniel. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
daughter spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Courtney Jarrell, of Pet- 
ersburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey have 
started to move to their new home 
in Petersburg. They hope to fin- 
ish moving this week. 

Mrs. Wallace Aylor is suffering 
with a severe cold. 

Wallace Aylor was a business vis- 
itor in Covington, Friday. 



CONSTANCE HOMEMAKERS 

The Constance Homemakers met 
at the home of Mrs. Grace Dolwick 
February 2nd. There were 16 mem- 
bers and four visitors present. 

Our president gave a very good 
report on the Advisory Council 
meeting held in Burlington, Jan. 
11. A paper drive will be sponsor- 
ed and paper will be delivered to 
the school not later than Feb. 10. 

Our lesson on "Household Pests" 
was given by Mrs. M. Prabel and 
Mrs. Ida Herbstreit, and they dis- 
tributed leaflets among the club 
members. 

Two from our club donated blood 
to the Blood Bank last month. 
There are eleven or twelve mem- 
bers planning to give their blood 
to the Blood Bank in Cincinnati on 
Feb. 23. If there is anyone in the 
community who wishes to donate 
their blood, they are welcome to 
join the group on the ten o'clock 
Constance bus. 

Our door prize was donated by 
Mrs. Dora Dolwick and won by Mrs. 
James Dye. 

Our next meeting will be held 
at Mrs. Emil Regenbogen's, March 
1st. Roll call is to be answered 
with some event that happens in 
March. 4f 



Go To Church 



BELLEVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. '"■• Guth, Pastor 

Sunda" School at 10:00 a. m. C. 
W. T. W. B. i.-tgera, Supt. 

Morning worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. Y. P. U. at 7:00. Evening ser- 
p. m. C. W. T. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8:00 
p. m. 

Everyone Is cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



EAST BEND METHODIST 

CHUDCH 
Rev. S. B. Godby, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday evening at 7 p. m.; also 
every fifth Sunday morning and 
evening. 

Everyone cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Boot. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Henry Beach, Pastor 

Sunday School 11 a. m. E. W. T. 

Church 12:0$ E W. T. 

Evening services 8 p. m. E. W- T. 



7*" 
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I PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. I 
l 

COVINGTON, KENTUCLV 



Deposits Insured Under the Federa 
| Deposit Insurance Corpora^ n . 

TilllllllllllHlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH^- 

'JIMKIIII'lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillHll^ 

F. W. Kassebaum & Sc ki Inc. 






— Secretary. 




Our boys must keep on 
ing — we must keep on bay- 
ing WAR BONDS until vic- 
tory is won. Keep on BACK- 
ING THE ATTACK. 



1 Authorized Dealers % 
'Rock of Ages" Barre Granite 

MONUMENTS 

! 

Aurora, Indiana 

inn 






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CATHERMAN FUNERAL HOME 



Ambulance Service 



| LUDLOW, 



•• . " . 






KENTUCKY = 



. 



Phone COlonial 2580 » 



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I 



5 THE TEST OF TIME .. . 



Alter more than 37 years of successful operation we believe 
we can safely say that our organization has stood this stern- 
est and most exacting of all trials. 



i Chambers & Grubbs i 

= FUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 352 = 

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L 



HOW ARE YOUR EYES? 

Practically every "vital" field 
of work helpful to National 
Defense demands correct 
vision! Industry, Military, Civil 
Service ... all pass or reject 
according to your eyesight. 
Let u$ examine your sight, 
today. 

DR. J. 0. TYSON 

OFFICES WITH 

T C H 

Opticians— Jewelers 

613-15 Madison Ave., Covington 
SINCE 1807 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Harold Wainscott, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Joseph 
C. Rouse, Supt. 
■ Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m. 
Prayer- Service Wednesday even- 
ing 8 p. m. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an * work with us. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 




UNIFORM 

SUND 
CHOO 

By HAROLD L. LtrnDQUfft'. D. D. 

Of The Moody Bible Institutes Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspjnyr Union. 



Lesson for Fc 



Srua£y 20 



Lesson subjects and :ripture texts se- 
lected and copyright! by international 
Council of Religious » ucatien; used by 
permission. 




JESUS TEA CpE S TRUE 
GREATNESS 

LESSON TEXT— Mark 8:33-39; lfr:13-l«. 
42-49. 

GOLDEN TEXT— The Son of man cam* 
not to be ministered unto, but to minister, 
and to give bis life a ransom for many.— 
Mark 10:45. 



at is not wrong 
a proper con- 

and seeks it 
ery one of us 

best, not for 

r God's glory. 

e earnest and 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. Harry 
Jarbo, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Sam Hogan, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Harry 

Rouse, Supt. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m . (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. (CWT) 

Evening Worship 7:45 (CWT.i 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas. Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 



Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 



UNION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pas tor 

Sunday School 10:0 0a. m. ( CWT) 
Morning Services 11 a. m. (CWT ) 
Evening Services 7 p. m. (CWT). 
Worship services every second 
and fourth Sunday. 



BULU TTSBU RG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 
Rev. Roy Evans, Pastor 
Sunday School at 10:30 C. W. T. 
G. B. Yates, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:30 C. W. T. 
First and Third Sundays. 
Evening Worship at 6:30 C. W. T. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. EST. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. for Juniors 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



CONSTANC E CH URCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaugh, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday* at 7:30. 
You need your church. 



BURLING TON METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. CWT. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. CWT. 

Youth Fellowship 6:30 p. m. CWT 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30 CWT. 

Services held eacn Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



CONSTAN CE C HRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Arthur T. Tipton, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays 
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. 

Bible School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. Paul Craven, Supt. 

FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 

WALTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. C. J. Alrord, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:15 a. m. Wm. 
Taylor, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11:15 a. m. 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 

Evening Worship 8:36 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 8:30. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. , 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. E. M. Helton, Pasto r 

Sunday School at 11 a. m. EWT. 
John C. Whitaker, Supt. r 

Morning Worship 12 a. m. EW T. 
Evening Worship 8 p. m. EWT. 

Prayer meeting Saturday at 8 p. 
m. EWT. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. . 



BULLITTSBURO BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. G. B. 
Yates, Supt. , 

Preaching first and third Sun- 
days at 11 a. m. by pastor. 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend these services. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. T.) Ed Shinkle, Supt 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. 

Evening Service at 7:30 (O.W.T.) 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
at 8:00 p. m. 



Ambition to be g 
—provided one hs 
ception of greatm 
in a right way. 
should be our v 
selfish reasons, bu< 

The disciples wl 
eager to have a place of honor with 
the Lord in glory, but even in that 
holy purpose they became selfish and 
argumentative. Jesus gives several 
marks of a truly great man. 

Greatness Means Being— 

I. Not First, but Last (9:33-35). 

, The way of the world is to seek 
the place of "No. > man"— to be 
looked up to, honored, and served 
by all. True greatness takes the last 
place, the place of a servant; and lo, 
God regards that as the first place. 
It is not a question of timid dif- 
fidence, or self-effacement, but • 
willingness to take the humble place 
in order to serve all.' 

II. Not Proud, but Humble (9:36, 
37). 

"Great" people of is world have 
no time for children ;Let them be 
cared for by servants teachers, any- 
one at all, but not bjitheir "distin- 
guished" parents. A 

But Jesus said thjfll the one .who 
set aside human pride and received 
a child with humility. of heart and 
mind— and in His name — received 
the Lord who gave mem life — spir- 
itual as well as physical— and is in- 
terested in them; in ' act, He is with 
them and hence wl ?n we receive 
them in His name, I j is there! 

HI. Not Exclusive but Co-opera- 
tive (9:38, 39). * 

John, quick to appfthend spiritual 
truth, saw in the tejening of Christ 
concerning the littt^ 'child the con- 
demnation of something he had 
done. 

The man who casts out demons, 
or who gives the disciple of Jesus a 
cup of water, in His name — that is, 
with true faith in Christ, and in His 
power, and for His glory^must be a 
believer. He may not belong to our 
group or circle, he may not speak 
our language, he may not use our 
methods, but if he is serving Christ 
we should not forbid him or speak 
evil of him. You and I rrlay not 
like one another's appearance, or 
voice, or methods, but let us love 
and co-operate with one another for 
Christ's sake! 

IV. Not Important, bat Approach- 
able (10:13-16). 

Some who think . they jre great, 
pride themselves on beii j hard to 
reach — protected from ; je rabble 
and their problems by ecretaries 
and servants. 'V 

The disciples had built rip such an 
idea of the importance oL Christ in 
their own minds. He had^never giv- 
en them any ground fox it. either 
by word or deed, \ 

So the man who is truly great fol- 
lows in the Master's footsteps. He 
is approachable, kind, hsf% time for 
simple, folk and little children. If 
that isn't true of a man < he is not 
great— no matter what he may think 
of himself or what others may say 
about him. 

V. Not a Supervisor, buf a Servant 
(10:42-44). 

Christianity is not organized after 
the manner of secular government 
(v. 42). Much of the mijehief that 
has come to pass in the church is 
the result of "running the church" 
as an organization, when it should 
be allowed to develop as a living 
organism. 

The way up is down. That is al- 
ways true in the spiritual realm. 
The Son of man came not to be 
ministered unto but to minister, yea, 
to give His very life (v. 45). Shall 
not those who bear His game walk 
the same path of humble self-denial? 

Anyone who observes with even a 
little care knows mat the- church of 
Jesus Christ is hindered most seri- 
ously by the presence of pride and 
selfish ambition. Some people will 
not work unless they can rule. 

Are there then no Christians who 
humbly serve the Lord? Yes, praise 
His name, there are many, and 
wherever they are found they are 
the salt of the earth. t 

VI. Not Unselfish, but Sacrificial 
(10:45). \ * 

The world is full of l sople who 
want to be served. Thef little per- 
sonalities swell with •-, ride and 
pleasure if someone else cringes and 
bows, and serves. ~* 

There is nothing commendable 

about being served. Thflgreat and 

good thing is to serve. 

j The Son of man — Himstjif the Lord 

of glory, the One who might have 

.called legions of angels to do His 

"will — came "not to be ministered 

unto but to minister." That service 

meant going about doing good even 

when He was exhausted and worn. 

But it meant far more than that, for 

it took Him to the cross where He 

gave "his life a ransom" for us. 

Are we ready to learn of Him? 



BULLTTTSVILLE CHRISTIAN 
CHUBTE 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and ith Sundays 
at 11 tf. m. and 8:00- 1 m. 

Church School <w Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kotton 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 



ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 17, 1904 



Belleview 

William Wingate and family, of 
Rabbit Hash, will move back to 
their home below Middle Creek. 

Rev. James^A. Kirtley has many 
friends here who mourn his death. 
Plattsburg 

Frank Voshell was visiting his 
parents in Aurora, last Wednesday. 

Robert Patterson and a Miss 
Goodpastor, of Aurora, were mar- 
ried on the 30th. 

Richwood 

Mrs. Jane Conner is still in Cin- 
cinnati, having her eyes treated. 

Wm. Glacken and family were 
guests at Gaines Robinson's, Sun- 
day. «| 

Gunpowder 

Mrs. Lizzie Bartell and Cora 
Blankenbeker, of Florence, are 
visiting friends in this neighbor- 
hood. 

Henry Tanner and wife, of Flor- 
ence, spent last Friday with his 
brother, M. R. Tanner. 
Landing 

Misses Carrie and Anna Huff, of 
Hamilton, were guests of Miss 
Eliza Feldhaus, Sunday afternon. 

Elvin Markesbery made a busi- 
ness trip to the city, one day last 
week. 

Hathaway 

Mrs. Florence Smith and daugh- 
ter spent last Tuesday with Mrs. 
Cynthia White. 

Robert Sullivan has recently 
moved to his place known as E. R. 
Smith's old homestead, on Gun- 
powder. 

Commissary 

Miss Grace Slayback and Stella 
Garland, who have been visiting 
Mrs. Slayback, returned to Erlang- 
er last Sunday. 

Mrs. Josie Grant, Miss Maud 
Scott, and Stella Ryle, went to 
Aurora, shopping, Thursday. 
Walton 

Mrs. Politt and Mrs. Rotherwell, 
who have been very ill, are report- 
ed some better. 

Bruce Dudgeon has pneumonia. 
Union 

Chester Hogan Rice and sister, 
Bessie Lee, were guests of their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hogan, last week. 

Miss Stella Taylor, of Richwood, 



was the guest of her sister, Mrs. ' 
James Kennedy, Monday. 
Idlewild 

Mr. and Mrs. William Clore will 
make their home at their daugh- 
ter's, Mrs. C. S. Balsly. 

Edwin M. Gaines is visiting his 
granddaughter, Mrs. V. W. Gaines, . 
of Rising Sun. , 

Taylorsport 

Mrs. Ida Sederberg and daugh- 
ter, Arminta, were visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. Moore at Beaver, Saturday 
and Sunday. 

J. H. Eddins is laid up with a 
very sore leg. 

Pt. Pleasant 

Miss Eva Dolwick has been stay- 
ing with her sister, Mrs. Frank Mc- 
Glasson near here. 

u Verona 

Mrs. Maggie "Powers and daugh- 
ter and Mrs. Lulu Roberts, were 
the pleasant guests of Mrs. Maud 
Johnson, last Saturday. 
Petersburg 

Mrs. B. J. Crisler is visiting her 
son W. H. Crisler in Cincinnati. 

Miss Leila Gardner, of Maysville 
is the guest of Lola Mathews. 
Florence 

Miss Nell Crigler attended the 
Leap Year dance at Erlanger, last 
Friday night. 

Malcolm Dulaney and family 
spent Sunday with his father, Dr. 
B. A. Dulaney. » "* 

Constance 

Shelby England will move back 
to his old home in the near future. 
Limaburg 

Mrs. Myrtle Crutcher, of Hebron 
spent Sunday afternoon with her 
sister, Mrs. Ezra Aylor. , v . 

Rabbit Hash 

J. Colin Kelly and wife were vis- 
iting Mrs. Kelly's mother, Mrs. 
Sutton, of Aurora, last week. 




0T WILL DO y 
YOU h\0 

Good ukil-ess 
vou us^ 

IT 

/ 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
* hope yon will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES now? Reference: Ask 

the first man you meet. 




|lilllllllllllllinilllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llil!!l!l!ll!i!!l!i!lllllllll!l!lll!llll| 

| FULL CREDIT 

given on 
M ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES [g 

| TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME § 

I Phone ERL. 87 Ambulance Service \ * 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



. A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 
\ V 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable "and sympathetic service 

THARP & STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EVES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZCER 



OPTOMETRIST - 

631 Madison Ave* 



— OPTICIAN 
r C o vin q ton . H\ 



,1'^ 




'. ■ 




FLORENCE 



We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Geneva Souther is on the sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Oarnett spent 
Monday evening in Ludlow with 
their son Carl Garnett and family. 

Mrs. Lloyd Rouse and son call- 
ed on Mrs. J. T. Stephenson on 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. Victor Johnson has return- 
ed to her home at Grand Rapids, 
Mich., after spending a few weeks 
with her mother and sister, Mrs. 
William Cook. 

Mrs. Linnie Easton is spending a 
few days in Covington with her 
daughter, Mrs. Fred Prather and 
children. 

Elby Dringenberg who under- 
went an operation for ruptured 
appendix at Booth Hospital, is re- 
ported to be doing nicely. His 
many friends wish him a speedy 
recovery. 

Quite a number from here at- 
tended the Sadie Tanner sale on 
Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles (Bud) Sul- 
livan are rejoicing over the arriv- 
al of a baby boy, born Thursday, 
Feb. 3rd at Booth Hospital. 

George Hartman and wife, of 
Erlanger Road called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Dick Garnett, Tuesday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. Minnie Clore attended the 
funeral of J. N. Berkshire at Pet- 
ersburg Wednesday afternoon. 

James Edward Baxter and wife 
of Portland, Ind., were dinner 
guests Friday evening of his aunt, 
this scribe and Chas. Beall and 
Mrs. John M. Connley and sons. He 



also called on his brother Wilford 
Baxter and. family, of Erlanger 

Road. • I •' " 

Walter Arnold has returned home 
after spending a few days in De- 
troit, Mich., with his daughter, 

Fred Prather was removed to 
Booth Hospital one night last week 
for an appendix operation. 

Friends in this community were 
sorry to ha*r of the sudden death 
of Mrs. Florence Riggs, of Erlang- 
er. We extend our sympathy to 
her loved ones. 

Rev. Bruce Easterday and wife 
and his mother of Price Hill spent 
Saturday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Tanner. 

Mrs. Bud Sullivan and little son 
returned from Booth Hospital on 
Saturday to the home of Mr. Sul- 
livan's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Sullivan. 

Mrs. Harry Tanner visited Mrs. 
Lawrence Thompson, Mrs. Louis 
Sullivan' and Mrs. Charles Sullivan 
and little son, Sunday. 

William L. Lee, Pharm. 1-c of 
Great Lakes, 111., and Miss Jeanne 
Napier, of Hazard, spent the week- 
end with his aunt and uncle, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. R.' Miller. A family 
dinner was given in their honor 
on Sunday. Many of his friends 
were present. 

The Florence Boy Scouts will 
sponsor a bakery sale February 26 
at Dinn's Restaurant. 

1 1r. and Mrs. Louis Houston and 
soi spent Sunday in Ludlow with 
relatives. 

Pvt. Tommy Owens, who is sta- 
tioned in Tennessee, arrived here 
Saturday for a few days with his 
mother, Mrs. Hattie Owens. 



PETERSBURG 



To Taxpayers of Boone County 

THE LAST DAY TO PAY YOUR 1943 TAXES 
BEFORE THE PENALTY IS ADDED IS 



FEBRUARY 29, 1944 



J. T. WILLIAMS, Sheriff 

' OF BOONE COUNTY 



The community was saddened on 
Monday, Feb. 7, when the news 
reached us of the death of one of 
our oldest citizens, John Bellf ield 
Berkshire. We extend sympathy to 
the family. 

Mrs. D. J. Roseboom and Bern- 
ard Berkshire, of Frantfort, Ohio, 
and Stewart Berkshire, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, -were called here to 
attend the funeral of their broth- 
er and uncle. 

Mrs. Chas. Klopp attended the 
funeral of her aunt, Mrs. Katie 
O'Brien at Mt. Healthy, Ohio, on 
Monday. 

Mrs. William Crisler is ill with 
the flu. 

Mrs. Art Rosebaum and baby 
returned from the hospital last 
week to the home of her sister, 
Mrs. Chas. Akin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry Mahan en- 
tertained a number of their rela- 
tives Sunday. The occasion was 
J in honor of Mr. Mahan's sixty- 
second birthday, 

Mrs. Porter Huey spent^he week 
end with her husband in Chicago. 

Ed Lampkin and family and Mr. 
Lampkin's Sunday School class 
from the Delhi, O., Church attend- 
ed Sunday School at the Chris- 
tian Church here Sunday morning. 
The boys were in charge of the 
music and devotional which was 
enjoyed by all present. They were 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Alloway. 

The Geisler sale was postponed 
until a later date on account of 
inclement weather. 

Perry Carver has been ill this 
week the result of a leg injury 
which he received at his work. 
• Mrs. T. E. Randall called on Mrs. 
J. B. Berkshire on Saturday after- 
j noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perry Carver en- 
tertained with a party Saturday 
night in honor of their son John 
Edwin's birthday. 

Claude Edwards Jr., is spending 
his furlough with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Claude Edwards. 

Glad to report that Mrs. Lyman 
Christy is able to be out after be- 
ing confined to her home so long, 
due to illness. 



GAYETV 
THEATRE 1 

ERLANGER, ELSMERE. KY . 
FREE PARKING LOT 



SHOW TIME 

Mon. thru Fri. 7:00 and 8:45 p. m. 
Sat. 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 p. m. 

i 

Sunday 3 Shows 6:00, 7:45, 9:30 
Sunday Matinee 2:36 p. m. 



PANNELS BOTTOM 



TONIGHT and FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 24 AND 25TH 




Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Goodridge 
were visiting their daughter, Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert- Dolwick, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Dye spent 
last Thursday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Sprague. Mr. 
Sprague has been confined to his 
home with a severe attack of 
lumbago. 

Little El va Ann, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert Dolwick is oh the 
sick list at this writing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl McGIasson 
entertained with a birthday party 
last Wednesday evening in honor 
of their daughter, Virginia Earl's 
15th birthday. 

A few citizens of this community 
attended the Wm. Wahl sale, last 
Saturday afternoon. 
: Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith and 
children of Taylorsport, spent Sat- 
urday evening with ttteir aunt and 
uncle, Mr. and Mrs. J*ames Dye. 

Anyone having neva for this 
column please call H &ron 385. It 
will be greatly appre* ated. 
. Mrs. Grace Dolwick^ and Mrs. 



John L. Hankins attended a party 
at the home of Mrs. Flora Roda- 
mer, Thursday. Mrs. Rodamer has 
been an invalid for sometime. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Sprague, Sr., 
of Taylorsport is leaving this 
week to be with their son Sgt. 
Ralph S. Sprague, who is stationed 
at Blackstone, Va. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Aylor and 
Mrs. Wm. E. Aylor have returned 
from Camp Blanding, Fla., after 
visiting Pvt. Wm. E. Aylor, who is 
stationed there at this time. 



that of Mrs. Charlie Sleet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Webster have 
moved to J. W. Conley's farm. Mr. 
aod Mrs. Marvin Kite have moved 
to Mrs. J. E. McCabe's and Edward 
Hamilton to the Allen place 



BEAVER LICK 



Pfc. Charles Howe Cleek, of Camp 
Breckinridge spent the week-end 
with home folks, here. 

William Huey Green, a member 
of the U. S. Air Force, is here for a 
fifteen-day stay with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Green. 

Rev. and Mrs. Q. M. Simmerman 
of Maysville, were here Tuesday 
and Friday of this week. On Tues- 
day Rev. Simmerman conducted 
the funeral of Mrs. William Brown 
at Hughes Chapel and on Friday 



A special dish may be made 
from left-over' vegetables. Com- 
bine them with canned or cooked 
tomato and bring to a boil. Then 
pour into a making dish and cover 
with biscuits. Bake until the bis- 
cuits are brown. 



Your 






10% of all headaches are due 
to eye trouble. Correct glasses 
usually give relief by reliev- 
ing eyestrain. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 




mat wawmmmmmm 

Also Cartoon and News 



SATURDAY 

FEBRUARY 26TH 



GRANT 4-H CLUB NEWS 

We had our first meeting of the 
new year, February 1, 1944 and 
plected the following officers: 
President, Betty Jane Pendry; vice 
president, John Carroll Rogers; 
secretary, Loretta Pendry; club re- 
porter, Virginia Stevens; Sgt.-at- 
Arms, Lafe Miller; cheer leader, 
Wilbur O. Ryle; community leader, 
Mrs. Martha Wolfe; assistant, Miss 
Rachel Pottinger; clothing captain, 
Virginia Stevens. We have twenty- 
six members this year. 

Virginia Stevens, Club Reptr. 




:\ 



autriat 



CHISTIR 

M0RRI 
•"-KELLY 

* Bil HMf) • 6wb Keayoi 
Joe Sawyer « Varie McDoaaJd 

» niAUMiT rwTNi 
Also Batman No. 14 and Cartoon 




SUNDAY and MONDAY 

FEBRUARY 27 AND 28TH 



FOOT HURTP 

READ THIS 

No matter how long you have had foot trouble or how 
many Arch Support Shoes you have tried without relief— 

SURGICAL SHOES 

will straighten up yours, and restore foot and body 

balance. 

Investigate Surgical Shoes, Prescription 

Shoes and Health Spot Shoes 

FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

FREE FOOT ANALYSIS 

DON'T SUFFER NEEDLESSLY 

Three Foot Comfort Specialist Will 

give you a Freei 

Analysis, Show ' 

you how Feet | 

can be relieved. 

See For Yourself 



The inside of Surgical and Prescription shoes 
are shaped to fit every curve of Your Feet. 

They support the Health Spot at the inner curve of your 
heels and vital Arch under the center line of your body 
weight. Because of this natural shape and snug heel fit, 
heels cannot roll in or out, weak feet are 'straightened to 
natural position, assuring foot comfort. 

PEOPLES SHOE STORE 

L| "Where Foot Comfort Begins" 

I 814-816 Madison Ave. Covington, Ky. 

Three Foot Comfort Specialists In Daily Attendance 






;i* 



,u& 



§** 



OUVIA 

deH AVI HAND 



i 

THIS week America honors the memory of electricity as a producer of materials for 
of the man whose genius led to the destruction. He visualized it as a servant of 
development of an industry that has proven mankin d that would ease man's labors, make 
to be one of the nation's greatest assets in 8°°ds more plentiful and cheaper, and un- 
its hour of greatest peril. P rove f***"* standards beyond any previous 

conception in history. 
If Edison were alive today he would be 

profoundly thrilled by electricity's contribu- Edison liy ed to see his dream come true, i 

tJon to America's gigantic war production And ^ h ^ this war is won, electricity will 

program-by the endless flow of arms made ?£^T 2 ""T S ""f* ° f progreSS ' 

l~,o.-ki« u *a_ -~» lh j i j bringing new comforts and conveniences, 

possible by America s unchallenged leader- new ^netts to mankind. 

ship in the field of power production. 

But back in 1879 when he perfected the 
incandescent lamp and later in 1882 when 
he gave the world the first practical central 
istation electric system, he was not thinking 




mm. 

.*CHARl£SCOBURN 
iJ/MK CARSON -JANE WMAN m4»m 
\ffitm tpWCMAN mm a m 8. muis ppok 

Also Cartoon and News 



TUES. and WEDNESDAY 

* FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 1 
FEATURES 






ASH SAVI 



OFFERED 






Poultrymen 



mtfUS 

OUT OF THE 

HEADLINES. 




FILL IN THI CREDIT CHECK NOW AND SAVE UP TO 15 PER CENT. 
CHICKS Willi BE BOUGHT EARLY AGAIN THIS YEAR, AND WE AD- 
VISE YOU T0 RESERVE YOUR CHICKS FOR YOUR FAVORITE SHIP- 
PING DATE 10 THAT YOU WILL NOT ME DISAPPOINTED. 

Montfy Saved Is Money Earned 

Good on any tweeds shown on price list, but not good when less than 100 
chicks are ordered. * 



NON-SEXED 
BLOODTESTED STOCK 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 

BARRED PLYMOITH ROCKS 

S. C. RHODE ISLi VD REDS 

R. C. WHITE WY PJDOTTES 

NEW HAMPSHIRE-REDS 

S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 

JIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllilHIIIII 

B Good only whc^F returned to Fnll-O-Pep Feed 



PER 

100 



For America, birthplace of the electrical 
industry, has the power to win the war . . . 
and the power to take the lead in building 
toward that better world that is sure to come 
when peace returns. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Buy More and More War Bonds 



ALSO 



"TAHITI 
HONEY 

News and Cartoon 



For your convenience this 
Theater sells WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS— Stop at the 
box office. 



= Store, 512 Pike St., Covington. (Send your own 

■ check or money order for difference covering full 

■ amount of ordej ) ' 

PRINT *AME AND ADDRESS 

= PAY TO THE • 
E ORDER OF 



Good on or before 
March 1, 1944 



$1.00 



Credit for each 100 E* 
chicks ordered. E 



= ADDRESS 



E Fill in total 
E ordered here 
E number chicks 



FULL-O-PEP FEED STORE 

By HUGO LANG 



E ( |||iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll:llllilllllllllllllllllr 

We Sell DR. SALSBURY'S Poultry Remedies 
Poultry Feeders. Water Founts,, Etc. 

FUL-O-PEP FEED STORE 



512 PIKE ST. 
COVINGTON, KY. 






HEmlock 9168 
Open Sundays Till Noon 



»:■ 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1944 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi 

WITH OUR BOYS IN 
THE SERVICE 

iliiiiiiiiiiiimiuiiiiiimiiiiimiiiimiimiii 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Thomas J. Stew- 
art: 

"Except for the dire dearth of 
time I would have made my "de- 
but" in the good old Recorder, long 
ago. 

"It is the fightinest combat en- 
gineers I am now assigned with, 
and after my training is completed 
I will be associated with ah Army 
Society who have the perogatives 
and distinction -of being "First in 
battle and last to leave." That is 
the spirit and tradition of the 
whole Army Engineer Corps. 

/'Our training routine is decided- 
ly strenuous and comparable in 
some respects to varied branches of 
the army moulded into one. We 
learn the basic tactics of the In- 
fantry and then go onto master 
the military arts allied with engin- 
eering such as building bridges, 
roads, laying and removal of mine 
fields, tank traps, demolitions, etc. 

"Although I should like to, mind- 
ful of news space conservation, I 
am reluctant to give you a resume 
covering our various activities here 
at the post in one 24-hour day. But 
sometime again in the future I 
might? consolidate some of the 



highlights briefly. Here I have 
seen the evidence and have drawn 
my conclusions as to why we are 
"second to none." 

"I have had the slight misfor- 
tune of having had an injury to 
my ankle while training. Temp- 
orarily -I am recuperating amid an 
atmosphere of charming and effi- 
cient army nurses of our Post Hos- 
pital, which fortunately also al- 
lowed me the pleasure of some 
added correspondence. 

"Thank you kindly for The Re- 
corder which I have enjoyed im- 
mensely. (Give my regards to all 

my friends." 

• • m 

| Pfc. Wm. B. Shotwell, 2nd Sig. 
Co. 2nd Inf. D., APO 2 care Post- 
master, New York, N. Y., writes: 

"Just a few lines to give you my 
change of address. I'm now in 
North Ireland after traveling all 
over these British Isles. The news 
I can write home is very little so 
this won't be much more than a 
note. 

"I have met a few boys from 
Kentucky, but not any from Boone 
County. As yet I haven't been out 
of camp much, so there is still a 
chance of finding someone. 

"I have been assigned to the 2nd 
Division, a very good outfit,,, known 
from the last war, when France 
hdnored them for their work. It is 
mostly an outfit made up of fel- 
loe s from Texas. That is about all 
I can say about my outfit. How- 
ever, I can say I really miss getting 



jmiiiiiiuimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iii»»n ,,l,,,,,,,,,n,,l = 

J SERVICE for 25 YEARS | 

Our REPUTATION is | 

1 your PROTECTION j 

I R. MICHELS WELDING COMPANY | 

1 722 Washington St. Covington COlonial 0670 | 
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? 



The Recorder. I haven't received 
it since I left the states, and this 
is the first chance I have had to 
get 'my new address to you. 

"This is supposed to be the land 
of roses, where Johnny Doughboy 
found his rose. Well, frankly, I 
wouldn't trade my little girl in 
Boone County for all the so-called 
roses of Ireland. 

"Well do get the address changed 
and I want to thank you for the 
many copies I received back in the 

states." * 

* • * 

Pvt. Kenyon Clore. 35675375, Hq. 
and Hq. Co., 7th Army, APO 758, 
care Postmaster, New York, N- Y., 
writes: 

*T just received two issues of The 
Recorder and after reading /'With 
Our Boys In Service'' I felt rather 
guilty for not writing sooner to 
show my appreciation. Nevertheless 
I've been receiving it regularly 
and certainly enjoy it a lot. Keeps 
a person up on the goings-on of 
the boys in service and finds out 
their location. 

"I cannot say where I am but 
I'm in good health and working 
every day. Haven't been fortunate 
enough to run across any of the 
boys from Boone County. 

"Must say the Boone County Re- 
corder is strictly on the ball and 
gives a G. I. many, minutes of 
pleasure. Thanking you again — 

you're doing a swell job." 

• • • 

Three relatives of Mrs. J. W. Con- 
ley of near Beaver Lick are serv- 
ing in tire U. S. armed forces. They 
are Lt. Giles Riley, Bombardier in 
Italy, Sgt. William P. Riley station- 
ed in India and Seaman 2/c Emma 
Jean Riley, located at the Naval 
Training School,, Women's Reserve 
Bronx, N. Y. 

The above mentioned two broth- 
ers and sisters are all of Owen 
County. They are the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Riley of Sparta. 

Lt. Giles Riley was commissioned 
a Lieutenant March 27, receiving 



his silver wings of a bombardier. 

Miss Riley joined the WAVES on 
October 20th, and received her 
first honors a month later, gradu- 
ating from boot training and being 
classified as a second class seaman. 

Sgt. William Riley entered the 
service in September 1942. He re- 
ceived special training in engineer- 
ing and operations with the Air 
Force, graduating with honors in 
February. He was sent overseas in 
May, arriving in the western part 
of India in July. Three months 
later he was moved across country 
to the eastern coast, near China. 
Sgt. Riley refused a commission 
which was offered when he enter- 
ed service, as he wanted to make 
his rating through service and 
work. 



yj 



MIIK PRODUCERS WANTED 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID 

CALL COLONIAL 0694 
Or CaU at 

HAHNEKEN DAIRY COMPANY^ 

624 SCOTT BLVD. COVINGTON, KY. 



m 



Buy Garden 
Seed NOW! 

I I DON'T WAIT TILL ITS 

ALL SOLD OUT! 

BUY AT 

GOODE'S 



CONSTANCE 4-H CLUB 

The club met and was organized 
February 3, 1944. Mr. Perkinson 
and Miss Gillaspie gave talks on 
the projects that should be taken 
up in the coming year. 

The following officers were 
elected for the year: President, 
Alberta Fugate; vice president, 
Helen Snelling; secretary and re- 
porter, Eleanor Washmuth; cheer 
leader, Ruby Sprague; sergeant-at 
arms, Harold Austin. 

We had fourteen members en- 
rolled. 

Eleanor Washmuth, Reporter. 



Long lib 
And Your Feet 




» t 






i 



'■:. 



*ff 



■ 




inside of the shoe should resemble 
the normal foot print in soft turf 
or sand. 

Such a ihoe* with sound con- 
struction and foot shaped base 
planes is found in an especially 
built surgical shoe. — Adv. 



RABBIT HASH 



Russell Stephens and family 
were visiting his sister, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Ryle, Sunday. 

Mrs. Dora Delph has been stay- 
ing with her daughter, while Al- 
bert Feldhaus has been in the hos- 
pital. 

We are sorry to hear that Ivan 
Walston suffered a broken collar 
bone and other injuries when his 
truck overturned near Georgetown. 

Mrs. Gene Wingate is staying 
with her brother J. E. Hodges this 
week, while her niece ,is in the 
hospital. 



PUBLIC 



I have sold my farm through Rel C. Wayman 
Real Estate, Covington, Ky., and I will sell at 
auction, all my stock and tools on old Banklick 
road, east of Florence, 



SAT.. FEB 






i n 



At 12:00 Noon 



! 



23 PIKE STREET 



COVINGTON, KY. 



WANTED 

MEN 

and 

200 WOMEN 

t Good working conditions and pay. Apply at 
Personnel Office between 8 a. m. and 4 p. m. 
Applicants must comply with 
W. M. C. regulations 

Schenley Distilleriesjnc. 



- 



OLD QUAKER DIVISION 

Foot of Brown Street 
LAWRENCEBURG, -:- INDIANA 



LIVESTOCK— 7 good milch cows, 2 with calves 
by their side, others to be fresh in Spring; team 
of good work horses. 

FARMING TOOLS— Good cream separator; 1 
sled; 1 road wagon; set double harness; pair of 
check lines and leather collars; set of single work 
harness; disc harrow; mowing machine; hay 
rake; double shovel plow; new Rastus plow; one- 
horse jumper; 2-horse jumper; hillside plow with 
extra points; fence stretcher; hoes and forks; 
post digger; corn planter; 1000 tobacco sticks. 

MISCELLANEOUS— Wood stove; oil drum; iron 
barrels; ladder; 2 horse blankets; 2 cream cans; 
3-gallon can; lot of other articles too numerous 
to mention. 

FEED— 5 to 6 tons hay in barn. 
TERMS— CASH 

W. K. THOMAS 

OWNER 

Lute Bradford, Auctioneer 

REL C. WAYMAN 

623 Washington St. HEm. 5107 INd. 5064 









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USED CAR BARGAINS 

1937 FORD COACH $325 

1937 STUDEBAKER SEDAN $375 

1937 DODGE COACH $350 

1937 STUDEBAKER COUPE $350 

1936 LINCOLN ZEPHYR ...>..„ $295 

1936 PACKARD SEDAN $275 

1938 WILLYS SEDAN $325 

1939 BUICK CLUB COUPE $850 

1939 HUDSON SEDAN , ; .........$695 

1936 CADILLAC ..$325 

1936 CHEVROLET COUPE $275 

1936 CHEVROLET SEDAN $245 

65 MORE FROM $60 UP 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madis< n, Covington 



Long illness or-- long convalesc- 
ence often may tag the cause of 
painful muscle spSm ift t the lower 
limb and foot. In eit.'«r circum- 
stance long periods o: inactivity, 
lack of exercise, cc pled with 
the weakened condit m of the 
body cause the musjtfes to lose 
tone and become wea%and flabby. 

The foot, while l5»ig> as in 
bed, cannot and is no" held^'in a 
normal position in relation to 
the limbs and rest of the body. 
The foot is held in an extended 
position, which allows a shortening 
of the large muscles in the back 
Of the limb, and allows the weaker 
muscles in the front of the limb 
to stretch. 

When partial strength, to the 
patient, is restored and he finally 
is allowed to walk, it is impera- 
tive that the bones of the foot are 
properly supported in shoes de- 
signed to distribute body ^eignt 
evenly over the whole bottom sur- 
face of the foot, and to relieve 
further, the strain on the muscles, 
ligaments and tendons, until norm- 
al strength and muscle tone return. 

An ordinary "strong looking" 
shoe is not the solution to this 
problem. Ordinary shoes with so- 
called arch supports and flat base 
planes, can only allow the foot 
condition to degress further. 

At this time special attention 
should be paid' to the inner con- 
struction of Qie shoe. The base 
construction and inner foundation 
of the shoe should be shaped to 
the NORMAL CONTOUR of the 
bottom of a NORMAL FOOT. The 



May we extend our sympathy to 
Mrs. Vernon Stephens in the loss 
of her mother Gladys (Ryle) Hub- 
bard, who was killed in a motor- 
cycle accident in California last 
week. 

This communtiy was shocked to 
learn of the sudden death of W. 
G. Kite who passed away Wednes- 
day evening at his home, Water- 
loo. Mr. Kite was a prosperous 
farmer and stockman and was 
loved by all who knew him. His 
wife Nannie (Pope) Kite preceded 
him to the grave several years ago. 

W. J. Craig received an honor- 
able discharge from the Navy last 
week and is home with his wife 
and family. 

Mrs. Mayme Dolph, of Belleview, 
was helping her mother of this 
place, Friday. 

Johnnie Woods and Cliff Step- 
hens are working in Cincinnati, at 
the Crosley plant. 

Robt. Wilson and Martin Wil- 
liamson moved last week. 

Paul Aylor and wife called on 
her sister, Mrs. Lutie Aylor, of Flor- 
ence, last Wednesday. 

Mrs. Bernard Hodges was remov- 
ed to Good Samaritan Hospital 
where she underwent an operation 



last Monday. We wish for her a 
speedy recovery. 

Ivan Ryle and wife made a busi- 
ness trip to Newport one day last 
week. 

W. J. Newhall will leave next 
week for North Carolina, where his 
son will be commissioned as an 
officer. 

We are glad to report that J. E. 
Hodges has improved somewhat 
during the past week. 



GUITARS 

$9.95 up 

FIDDLE OUTFIT 
$12.00 Up 

ROY ACUFF, GENE AUTRY, 
BRADLEY KINCAID AND 
OTHER GUITAR, CORD AND 
INSTRUCTION BOOKS. GIB- 
SON AND BLACK DIAMOND 
STRINGS FOR ALL INSTRU- 
MENTS. 

COMPLETE MUSICAL 

WATCH AND CLOCK 

REPAIR 

HANSER JEWERY & 
MUSIC COMPANY 

515' ••_» Madison Ave. 
Covington, -:- Kentucky 



NOTICi! 

DEALERS AND ROOM] G HOUSE 
, OWNERS HJ,'* 
20,000 PIECEsJpfr' 
CHINAWARE AND qg^SSWARE 

AS LOW AS 2 1 r 5c 

Enamelware, pots ank pans. 
Sold below factory o^st. 

SAVINGS UP TO 50 % 
PAT'S CHINA STORE 

736 MADISON CQlflNGTON 



PUBLIC SALE 

BEN BILZ is selling out.— Dudley Pike near Beacon Light 

SAT., FEB. 19 - AT 10 A. M. 

10 MILCH COWS-^5 fresh, 4 with calf by their 
side and 5 heavy with calf; 9 heifers, some com- 
ing fresh soon; 1 young bull; 3 good work horses; 
2 brood sows; lmale hog; 50 chickens; 10 ducks; 
set work harness. 

FARMING TOOLS — Mowing machine, John Deere; hay rake, 
John Deere; farm wagon, John Deere with hay bed; 2 disc 
harrows; one 10-disc, one 12 -disc John Deere; 2 corn drills, 
one 1-horse. one 2-horse; manure spreader; one 60-tooth sec- 
tion harrow; doubletree and singletrees; 1 drag harrow; two 
2-horse sleds; one 1-horse sled; one 14-inch John Deere turn- 
ing plow; one hillside plow; 1 double shovel plow; three 7- 
shovel cultivators 1 shovel plow; 20 tomato boxes; 10 dozen 
bushel baskets; 1 wheelbarrow; axes and grubbing hoe; forks, 
shovels and hoes; 1 cider press; .1 anvil; .1 potato digger; 
crosscut saws; sledge hammer; crowbars; 1 Bizzard silage 
cutter; four 10-gal. milk cans; milk buckets; 1 DeLaval elec- 
tric separator; new hot bed sash and hot bed boards; some 
household furniture. Truck, Chevrolet, H-ton, '33 model, 
panel job. Oliver turning plow. 

REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 

(23 Washington St. Covington HE. 5107' Ind 5066 

LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



Quick Dry Enamel .'jl.98 Gal 

Guaranteed House Paint 4!jL69 Gal 
Red Roof Paint ....... M.49 Gal. 

Aluminum Paint i .95 Gal. 

Black "Roof Coating £ 49c Gal. 

In 5-Gallon Kifc 
Kemtone 2.98 Gal 



GORDON SUPPW4CO. 



736 MADISON 



[NGTON 



WHEN IN TOWN B¥Y AT J. A. BAUMGARTNER 
LOWEST PRICES ON 



RUGS, MATTRESSES and FURNITURE 



COME IN AND SEE 



50-Lb. 

All Cotton 

MATTRESS 

37.95 

50-Lh, 

All Felt 

MATTRESS 

$10.98 



9xJ2 Felt Base Rugs $3.50 

12x12 Armstrong Rugs . . $8.95 

£xl2 32 Oz. Waffle 

Rug Pad __. : $5.95 

HEAVY WEIGHT 

GOLD SEAL yd. 49c 



MAPLE BABY CRIB $13.98 



Felt 

Day Bed 

MATTRESS 

I 

$8.95 

• 
Baby Crib 

MATTRESS 

$3.98 



Bedroom, Living room, studio couches, chairs, 
rockersj occasional pieces and many odd pieces. 

Don't Forget The Address 
1046 MADISON AT 11TH, COVINGTON, KY. 



CHICKS 



FROM BLOODTESTED STOCK 

WHITE PLYMOUTH KOCKS V 

BARRED PLYMOU1 I ROCKS 

WHITE WYANDOTI «S 

R. I. REDS \- 

BUFF PLYMOUTH I 9CKS 

ENGLISH WHITE t GHORNS 

AUSTRA- WHITES \ V 

AND OTHER BREEDS 

>J Custom Hatching 2 54 c Per Egg. 
Hatches each M» n day and Thursday Chicks Ready Tuesday and Friday 
DEARBORN FJ EDS UBIKO FEEDS 

J |pR. SALISBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES 

CONNER'S HATCHERY 

Phone Hejiron 133 HEBRON, KY. 

3 Post Office, Burlington, Ky., R. 1. 




THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



t > i ■ i n i n n i n i 

plllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 

I Seen And Heurd Around I 
1 I The County Seat 

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1944 



Mr v and Mrs. W. D. Atwood, of 
Cincinnati, were guests Sunday of 
Mr. arid Mrs. Lloyd Weaver and 
son and Mr. and Mrs. ; W<.P.:Bee~ 
mon. 

i/Liss Lucile Cotton ~ spen*--, the 

iweek-encL with her parents, Mr. 

arid Mrs. W. B. Cotton, of Latdnia. 

"Mrs. Frank Maurer, Mrs. Arthur 
Maurer and Mrs. Robert Maurer, 
spent Friday with Mrs. Ralph 
Maurer what is convalescing from a 
recent operation a* the home of 
Mrs. Josie Maurer. 

Miss Mary Belle Smith, who is 
attending school at Georgetown, 
spent several days this week with 
her parents, Rev. and Mrs. Wm. 
Smith. 

Miss Dorothy Gaines, of Cincin- 
nati, spent the week-end with Miss 
Carolyn Cropper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirtley Cropper and 
family and Rev. R. A. Johnson 
were dinner guests Sunday of Miss 
Mary Bess Cropper and W. L. Crop- 
per. 

• Mrs. C. L. Cropper, Mrs. George 
Porter and Mrs. John Conner, of 
Hebron, were entertained last 
Thursday afternoon with bridge 
and luncheon at the home of Mrs. 
D. R. Blythe. 

Mrs. Minnie Carpenter is spend- 
ing several weeks with her sister, 
Mrs. Cecil Gaines, of Walton. 

Coxswaia. William Sullivan, of 
the Merchant Marine is spending 



NOW . . . 

The nearest things to 

naturally ourley hair 

COLD WAVE PERMANENT 

Senational No-Heat Method 

of Permanent v 4 ^^• 00 

Waving X \J 

Other Permanents $4.00 up 

I AROSE 

JLl BEAUTY SALON |b 

400 Dixie H'way, Erlanger, Ky. 

• [ Phone Erl. 6252 
Edith Amburgey, Prop. 



a thirty-day furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. arid Mrs. Cad Sullivan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sullivan and 
daughter, Miss Jean Sinninger, of 
Florence and William Sullivan were 
Saturday evening guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roscoe Akin and daugh- 
ter. 

D. H. Norris was ill over the 
week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ryle, of 
Louisville were Sunday guests . of 
Mr. and Mrs, Manley Ryle. 

Cpl. Marvin Rouse Porter, Don- 
ald Kirkpatrick, Mrs. Charles Ben- 
son, Mr, and Mrs. C. D. Benson 
and family and Mr. Smith visited 
Pfc. Charles Benson, who is ill at 
the hospital in Ft. Thomas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cason moved 
last week to their home in McViJle, 
which they recently purchased 
from Leon Ryle. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Griffith mov- 
ed temporarily last week into the 
house owned by Furnish Pope. 

Cpl. Harvey Wynn Furnish spent 
Thursday night and Friday with 
his mother, Mrs. Byrd Furnish. 

Cpl. Alpha Lee Rogers, who is 
spending a furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rogers, 
of Belleview, attended church here 
Sunday night. 

Mrs. Manley Ryle fell last week 
in her home, breaking two fibs. 

Mrs. Arthur Gerbig, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry May, has been 
spending several days with her 
father, here. 

Miss Frances B. Deck has accept- 
ed a nice position in Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Nellie Hamilton, of Verona 
was the guest Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday of her brother Lawrence 
Scott, and Mrs. Wilfred Scott, of 
Burlington. 

Mr. Tom Carr, of Verona, was a 
visitor in Burlington, Tuesday, j - 

Charles Clore, of Hebron, who 
underwent an operation at Good 
Samaritan Hospital last week is 
improving, much to the delight of 
his friends. 

O. K. Dudgeon, of Walton has re- 
turned home from St. Elizabeth 



tfXHXHXHXHSHZMXHZHXHXHXHXHZHXHXHSHXHXNXHXHKHXHZHXNXHXS 

i Congratulations ! 



Hospital, Covington, after an oper- 
ation for appendicitis and is im- 
proving at this writing. 

Wm. C. Walton received a war- 
time appointment as railway mail 
clerk, last week. 

A card from J. G. Smith and wife 
who are spending, a few weeks in 
Miami, Fla., states that J. G. is 
having a splendid time. He writes 
"You haven't fished until you cast 
to the waters of Florida. Having 
time of my life. Fishing every day 
and catching many kinds." Don't 
let the big one get away, J. G. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Bodie call-, 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Stephens;" 
Saturday night. -. 

Mrs. Bertie Clore, who has been 
to Booth Hospital, expects " to re- 
turn home this week. 

Mrs. W.. J. Craig entertained for 
Sunday dinner in honor of her hus- 
band W. J. Craig who has Just re- 
turned a 'fcjoat Camp Perry', Via. 
Those present were W. J. Newhall, 
W. S. Ryle, Herman Ryle and 
daughter, Mrs. Minnette Stephens, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Williamson 
and children Lonnie, Toby and 
Robert Jennings, Mr. and Mrs. Cliff 
Stephens and children, Ronald Far- 
rell and Patsy Lee, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
W. Craig and the host and hostess. 



BELLEVIEW 



Protect Home Cured 

Meat Against Pests 



An ounce of prevention will save 
all th£ pounds of cured meat, ac- 
cording to the report given at 
Homemakers' Clubs this month. 
Infested meat causes a great loss 
to money and ration points to own- 
ers of home cured meat. Every 
pound of meat ruined by insects is 
the same as giving a pound to the 
enemy. 

Eliminate breeding" places of 
meat-house pests. Brush and 
scrub thoroughly all places where 
meat has been stored. Keep in- 
sects out of meat storerooms as 
they can fly and carry mits. 

All home cured meat should be 
cured and wrapped before Spring. 
Wrap each piece separately and 
securely in heavy greaseproof pap- 
er. All folds of paper should be 
sealed with paste or gummed tape. 
Wrapped ham should be placed to 
a closely woven cloth sack and 
J hung in the meat house so that 
pieces do not touch each other. 
The exposed side of cut hams and 
shoulder should be covered with 
melted paraffin to prevent" mold. 

A bulletin on "Protect Home 
Cured Meat from Insects" may be 
obtained from the Home Agents' 
office in Burlington. 



Boone County has again "Gone Over The Top" in 
subscribing its quota of $500,000.00 in the Fourth 
War Loan Drice. 



H 

X 
H 
X 
H 

X 

a 

x 

H 

X 
H 
X 
N 
X 
H 
S 

a 



Many felt that it could not be done this time, but 
the citizens of this county will not "back down" ,g 
when our country calls. 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



The community was saddened 
to learn of the. death of W. G. Kite 
at his home to Waterloo. Words 
of condolence are extended the 
family. 

Mrs. Mary Hankinson left Sun- 
day to visit relatives near Rising 
Sun, Ind. ■ 

Rev. W. C. Guth spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Willard Ryle. 

Lafe Miller, Sr., is ill at this 
writing. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs 
C. E. McNeely were J. D. McNeely, 
Al Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Rogers and sons, Cpl. Alpha Lee 
and John Carol Rogers. 

Mrs. Margaret Feldhaus is visit- 
ing with Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Kite 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown 
and daughter. 

Master Billy Sebree, of ; Burling- 
ton, spent several days Jast week 
visiting his grandparents,/ Mr. and 
Mrs. Willard Ryle. .) 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. B. Rogers, Jr., and daughter 
were Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Cason, 
Betty and Ivan, Mr. and Mrs. Lil- 
lard Scott and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Greisser and daughter, 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Walton and 
daughter. 

• Miss Cortone Walton spent the 
week-end with her grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Huey. 

Seaman Howard Shinkle, who 
has been stationed at Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire is visiting his sis- 
ter, Mrs. Mildred Rogers and fam- 
ily. 

Miss Mary Jean Hensley, of Bur- 
lington, spent Monday night with, 
Miss Charlotte Ashcraf t. 

Misses Mary Josie and Lillian, 
Stephens spent Monday night 
with their aunt, Mrs. Christena 
Kirtley. 

On Friday night the Burlington 
basketball team will travel to He- 
bron to play the Hebron team. On 
Saturday night the New Haven 
five will come to Burlington to en- 
counter the home team. The lat- 
ter will be the last game of the 
season before the annual tourna- 
ment. ' 

The box social given at the local 
sc